Current Filters
Click filter to remove
Displaying 1 - 10 of 36
Otomi | Chitimacha | Atakapa | Cherokee | Osage | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Nottoway | Kaw | Omaha | Dakota | Pawnee | Nanticoke | A'aninin | Miami | Mi'kmaq | Seminole | Quapaw | Yuchi | Lenape | Ojibwe | Shawnee | Seneca | Mohawk | Onondaga | Cayuga | Oneida | Tuscarora | Natchez | Wyandot | Creek | Mohican | Mohegan
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Ojibwa, Huron-Wyandot, Atsina, Gros Ventre, Micmac, Lenape
Date: 1798-1821
Type:Text
Extent: 219 pages
Description: This volume contains extracts of Benjamin Smith Barton's "New Views of the Origin of the Tribes and Nations of America" (Philadelphia, 1797), with additions by Peter S. Du Ponceau. The bulk of the volume is comprised of word list of 54 words with equivalents listed in a range of 50-70 languages. While Barton listed no authority, Du Ponceau cited sources. Languages with words listed include Chitimacha, Atakapa, Cherokee, Osage, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Nottoway, Kansa, Omaha, Dakota, Pawnee, Nanticoke, Gros Ventres, Miami, Mi'kmaq, Seminole, Quapaw, Yuchi, Delaware, Ojibwe, Shawnee, Seneca, Mohawk, Onondaga, Cayuga, Oneida, Tuscarora, Natches, Wyandot, Creek, Mahican, Mohegan, and many others. The word list includes the terms for God, heaven, and sky, as well as various terms relating to kinship, parts of the body, weather, and more. The volume also includes notes on sounds of the Otomi (Othomi) observations on declension; observations about the Omaha, Kansa, Oto, Arkansas, and Missouri languages; and notes on symbol and sound. Also includes a newspaper clipping of a review (in German) of Barton's "New Views" that appeared in "Göttingische Anzeigen von gelehrten Sachen," June 17, 1799.
Collection: A comparative vocabulary of Indian languages (Mss.497.B28)

Alabama | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Creek | Seminole | Apalachee | Koasati
Alternate forms: Alibamu, Coushatta
Date: 1934-1982
Type:Text
Extent: 0.5 linear feet
Description: Mary Haas worked for a short period to document Alabama with several speakers on in the 1930s. The field notebook is in Series 2 Subseries ‘Multiple Languages' and includes comparisons with Koasati and Choctaw. Around 585 lexical items were obtained from this fieldwork, from which lexical slip files (Series 9) are derived. Haas also utilized John R. Swanton's dictionary of Alabama, and Alabama forms part of extensive Muskogean language comparisons, mostly in Series 2. There is also brief correspondence.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Cayuga | Cherokee | Chickasaw | Lenape | Wyandot | Mandan | Ojibwe | Seneca | Susquehannock
Alternate forms: Conestoga, Iroquois, Huron, Wendat
Language(s): Cayuga | English
Date: 1785-1806
Type:Text
Extent: 0.5 Linear feet, 2 boxes; 2 volumes
Description: A manuscript compiled from originals in the Historical Society of Pennsylvania by William L. McAtee. Concerns murder of John Armstrong by Indians; mentions Canestogae tribe, Cayahoga path, Cheerake, Chickasaw, Colonel Cresap; tuberculosis among Indians; Delawares; eloquence; Indian barrows, fortifications, and graves; Kash kask kunck; Mandan; Seneca, Six Nations (Haudenosaunee), and Captain White Eyes. Also Crave Creek mound; Wyandot, Indian sugar camp; war customs and war party; treaty of December 1784 at Fort McIntosh with Chippewa and Wyandots; Indian burning; Indian diseases. Teedyuscung; Penn's treaty with the Delaware (1682 and 1702); meaning of "Geneseo"; Seneca battle with Koghquangians (Caughnawaga); Chickasaw; specimen of a Cayuga vocabulary with same list as that used in Barton (1797).
Collection: Benjamin Smith Barton journals; notebooks (Mss.B.B284.1)

A'aninin | Anishinaabe | Apache | Apache, Plains | Apache, Western | Arapaho | Arikara | Assiniboine | Blackfoot | Caddo | Catawba | Cayuga | Cherokee | Cheyenne | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Comanche | Creek | Crow | Lenape | Flathead | Haudenosaunee | Ho-Chunk | Hopi | Houma | Iñupiat | Iowa | Isleta | Kaw | Kickapoo | Laguna | Lakota | Mandan | Menominee | Meskwaki | Munsee | Nez Perce | Ojibwe | Omaha | Oneida | Otoe | Odawa | Penobscot | Pawnee | Ponca | Potawatomi | Quapaw | Seminole | Seneca | Shawnee | Shoshone | Stockbridge-Munsee | Tsimshian | Wabanaki | Wichita | Wyandot
Alternate forms: Arapahoe, Chippewa, Eskimo, Gros Ventre, Iroquois, Kansa, Lenape, Muscogee, Niimíipu, Odawa, Ojibwa, Ojibway, Salish, Sioux, Sac-and-Fox, Sauk-and-Fox, Winnebago, Wyandotte
Language(s): English
Date: 1939-1943
Extent: 0.25 linear feet
Description: There are a few items in the Frank G. Speck Papers currently identified as relating to Indian boarding schools.In the collection guide, under Subcollection 1, Series 1, in Section IV, "Southeast," see item IV(15H3), "Yuchi miscellaneous notes," which contains a letter from Ann Rolland (Haskell Institute), to Speck, April 6, 1941, as well as items under "C. Houma (Louisiana)" that relate to mission schools. In Section XIII, "Miscellaneous," see item XIII(22H), "Haskell Institute Roster," which lists of Native students and the Haskell Institute boarding school in 1939-1940, giving name, age, address, and tribe. (The tribes of the students included are listed above in this entry.) In Subcollection I, Series II, Biographical Material, see letters (listed alphabetically by author) from Leona E. Giger and Ann Rolland, both students at Haskell in the early 1940s. Also see letter from "Redge" and Gladys Laulin regarding Chippewa boy returning home for dances. In Series III, Photographs, there is an undated photograph [#10-14(a)] from the Shingwauk Indian Residential School. See also school-related photos in folders "Creek #3," "Eskimo [Inuit] (Labrador) #4," "Houma #1," #2, #7, and #8, "Pamunkey #6," and "Penobscot: People #2." In Series IV, Lantern Slides, there are slides of Native and Black students at the Hampton Institute. More boarding school-related material may be identified in the collection with further research.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Caddo | Lenape | Choctaw | Chickasaw | Osage | Pascagoula | Natchez
Language(s): English
Date: 1804
Type:Text
Extent: 107 pages
Description: "Journal up the Red and Washita rivers, with William Dunbar, by order of the U.S. with list of common names of some of the trees and vegetables from the River Washita." No. 2 of Explorations in the Louisiana Country. Describes mounds near Natchez and on the Ouachita. Mentions Caddo trace; Captain Jacobs, a Delaware Indian; Chickasaws, Choctaws, Osages (Little Osages and Grand Osages) and Pascagoulas; warfare and raids; and the singing of a Choctaw woman mourning a child. Printed (abstract only) as Jefferson (1806). [See also Hunter journals #473, volumes 2, 3, 4, May 27, 1804-March 29, 1805.]
Collection: Mémoire sur le district du Ouachita dans la province de la Louisianne, [1803] (Mss.917.6.Ex7)

Catawba | Yuchi | Chickasaw | Lenape | Choctaw | Cherokee | Tuscarora
Language(s): English | Catawba
Date: 1941 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 9 folders, 2 boxes
Description: Materials relating to James M. Crawford's interest in and study of the Catawba language. Items include card-sized paper slips, Catawba-English and English-Catawba, with pencilled notes in Series V. Card Files. There are also nine Catawba folders in Series IV-D. Research Notes and Notebooks--Other. One stand-alone undated folder contains mostly handwritten notes, including a comparison of Catawba to Yuchi, notes on references to Catawbas in Barton (1798), bibliographic sources on Catawba language and lingustics, and English-Catawba Vocabularies. Other indigenous languages and groups mentioned include Chickasaw, Delaware, Choctaw, Cherokee, and Tuscarora. The other eight folders each contain one of Raven Ioor McDavid's Catawba research notebooks, recorded in 1941 and given to Crawford in 1970 (see letter in McDavid correspondence in Series I. Correspondence). The notebooks in Folders 1-5 and 7 seem to be fairly straightforward linguistic material, focusing on narrative and interrogative statements and related vocabulary, verb tenses, pronouns, stems, etc. The notebook in Folder 6 is similar, but also contains notes on loose-page pages, including about 20 pages of Catawba geneaological information over multiple generations. The most prominent family names include Blue, Harris, Cantey, Brown, George, Sanders, and Ayers; other family names mentioned include Beck, Starnes, Cobb, Mush, Scott, Lee, White, Wheelock, Garci, Allen, Helam, Wiley, Gordon, Crawford, Gaudy, Blankenship, Millins, Watts, and Johnson. The notebook in Folder 8 focuses on stories--many about old women, animals, and interactions between female and animal characters--given first in English and then in Catawba with interlineal translation.
Collection: James M. Crawford Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.66)

Cherokee | Choctaw | Chickasaw
Language(s): English
Date: 1803
Contributor: Wilson, Patrick
Type:Text
Extent: 2 pages
Description: "Observations while passing thro' the Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Cherokee nations." No. 3 in Explorations in the Louisiana Country. Reverend Patrick Wilson describes his observations while traveling on a road built between Choctaw and Chickasaw country, including the state of Native-white relations and the growing white population in the area. At Muscle Shoals, he stays with Cherokee chiefs Doublehead and Skiowska. Notes that many Native peoples have good farms, good furnishings, good fences, and good stock, and that one Native man runs an inn.
Collection: Mémoire sur le district du Ouachita dans la province de la Louisianne, [1803] (Mss.917.6.Ex7)

Chickasaw
Language(s): Chickasaw | English
Date: 1800
Type:Text
Extent: 17 pages
Description: The Chicasaw materials in this collection consist of manuscripts listed in the finding aid as items 5 and 8: Benjamin Hawkins' "A comparative vocabulary of the Muskoges, or Creek, Chickasaw, Chocktaw, and Cherokee languages," and Daniel Smith's "Vocabulary of the Chickasaw Indians, Tennessee."
Collection: American Philosophical Society Historical and Literary Committee, American Indian Vocabulary Collection    (Mss.497.V85)

Chickasaw | Creek | Choctaw
Language(s): English
Date: 1787; 1777
Subject: Warfare | Diplomacy | Trade | Wampum
Type:Text
Extent: 2 items
Description: Letter from John Sevier regarding Creek raids and a murder in Chickasaw territory. Second item titled "Talk from Indians to George Golphin, one of the commissioners of Indian affairs" in which the King of Talesy (probably the Creek town of Tálisi) speaks of trade with Pensacola; relations with Chickasaws and Choctaws. In a second speech the King of the Ocksuskeys (probably the Creek town of Okfuski) speaks of Cupitaws (possibly either the Creek town Kasíhta or Kawíta) and Ockjoys (probably Creek town Oktcháyi); describes a belt of wampum.
Collection: Benjamin Franklin Papers (Mss.B.F85)

Chickasaw
Language(s): Chickasaw | English
Date: 1968
Subject: Linguistics
Extent: 1 sound tape reel (33 min.) : DIGITIZED
Description: The Chickasaw material in James Crawford's "Recordings of Native American languages" collection consist of a set of recorded Vocabularies in "Series 4: Chickasaw." (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: James Crawford Recordings of Native American languages (Mss.Rec.184)