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Seminole
Language(s): English
Date: 1818
Contributor: Young, Hugh, -1822
Type:Text
Extent: 125 pages
Description: Hugh Young was an army officer and topographical engineer accompanying General Andrew Jackson's army in its operations against the Seminoles. This memoir includes sections on East Florida's boundaries, physical characteristics, navigation, Native customs, Spanish settlements, African Americans, agricultural products, and climate. Also included are itineraries for East and West Florida. One chapter is devoted to the Seminole and other aboriginal inhabitants of Florida, and includes names, numbers, settlements, war and treaties, councils, marriage, trade, amusement, etc. (pages 48-73). Printed, Boyd (1934). Original document owned by Francis W. Rawle, Albany, circa 1954. Also found on this reel is Benjamin Hawkins' Journal of occurrences in the Creek agency from January to the conclusion of the conference and treaty at Fort Williamson, 1802 (Film 692a).
Collection: A topographic memoir on East and West Florida, 1818 (Mss.Film.692b)

Abenaki | Innu | Penobscot | Maliseet | Haudenosaunee | Wabanaki
Alternate forms: Abnaki
Date: 1914-1930
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: The Abenaki materials in the Hallowell Papers are mostly located in Series V, Research Files, in folders labled "Abenaki" and Series VI, Photographs, Subseries E "St. Francis Abenaki Album." These include linguistic, ethnographic, ethnobotanical, ceremonial knowledge, information on political organization, and historical materials. Of particular interest are a sketch of Abenaki history from 1600-1930 accompanied by detailed notes from secondary sources on 17th century Abenaki history. The linguistic materials include an analysis of how the language changed after contact with Catholic missionaries, Abenaki vocabulary related to body parts, Abenaki phonetics, and religious, medical, and kinship terminology. The ethnobotanical materials include a manuscript labled "Identity of animals and plants," and information concerning herbal medicine and its practitioners. There is a wealth of ethnographic materials that include drawings of pipes, descriptions of games, baketry and birch bark maks. There is descriptions of Abenaki music and diagrams of dances, as well as detailed descriptions of hunting techniques. Some of the genealogical materials contains lists of community members names and descriptions of marriage. Interspered throughout the folders labled "Abenaki" in the Research Files are interlinear translations of stories such as "Man who could Find Lost Objects," "Woman and Bear Lover" and numerous other stories. The materials on hunting include topics such as the use of snow shoes, preparation of moose hide,and techniques and drawings of trapping. The collections contain important information designation hunting territories and family names. Four folders contain detailed informaiton on kinship terms. Two folders on Measurements and Genealogical data contain lists of names. The folders labled "Linguistics" in Series V contain scattered information about Abenaki grammar. In Series VI, of 160 photographs taken at St. Francis, Odanak in the Centre-du-Québec region. The Abenaki people in the photographs are identified, in most cases, and also include depictions of traditional dress, buildings, clothing, baskets, and a wide variety of material culture. The corresondence, in Series I, includes letters from Gordon Day describing his collection of stories, regecordings, Vocabularies, and hunting territories. Henry Lorne Masta, one of Hallowell's Abenaki consultants, writes about culture and language.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Akimel O'odham
Alternate forms: Pima
Language(s): Tohono O'odham | English
Date: 1991
Contributor: Shaul, David
Type:Text
Extent: 1 folder
Description: Jane Rosenthal's only O'odham item is a draft of David Shaul's paper “A Piman Voice” on agriculture, religion and language in colonial New Spain (Series 2 Subseries 3).
Collection: Jane M. Rosenthal Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.129)

Creek | Choctaw
Language(s): English
Date: 1798-1810
Type:Text
Extent: 285 pages
Description: Original in possession of Independence National Historical Park. Letter book kept by Hawkins at the Creek Agency relating to Indian affairs, including outgoing letters, memoranda, and speeches to and from the Creeks and Choctaws. Topics include an attempt to survey the St. Mary's River and Spanish-U.S. relations. Includes a "sketch" of the Indians at the Creek Agency discussing political organization, agriculture, manufacture, public establishments, and justice. Materials written variously at Fort Wilkinson, Tukabatchee, and Coweta.
Collection: Benjamin Hawkins letterbook, 1798-1810 (Mss.Film.680)

Cherokee | Choctaw | Chickasaw
Language(s): English
Date: 1803
Contributor: Wilson, Patrick
Type:Text
Extent: 2 pages
Description: "Observations while passing thro' the Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Cherokee nations." No. 3 in Explorations in the Louisiana Country. Reverend Patrick Wilson describes his observations while traveling on a road built between Choctaw and Chickasaw country, including the state of Native-white relations and the growing white population in the area. At Muscle Shoals, he stays with Cherokee chiefs Doublehead and Skiowska. Notes that many Native peoples have good farms, good furnishings, good fences, and good stock, and that one Native man runs an inn.
Collection: Mémoire sur le district du Ouachita dans la province de la Louisianne, [1803] (Mss.917.6.Ex7)

Haudenosaunee | Delaware | Catawba | Cherokee | Houma | Nanticoke | Abenaki | Cayuga | Tutelo | Onondaga | Mohawk | Tuscarora
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Lenape
Language(s): English
Date: 1777-1950, bulk 1914-1950
Type:Text
Extent: 23 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Haudenosaunee history, language, and culture. Includes correspondence with Haudenosaunee consultants like John L. Buck, Seth Newhouse, Josiah Hill, David S. Hill, etc., on topics ranging from the seizure of wampum by the Canadian government, Newhouse's request that Speck secure wampum for him, Newhouse's offer to sell Speck his history manuscript, which he has been working on since 1885 [#1650], Haudenosaunee burial customs, religion, etc.; an essay by Jesse Moses titled "The Long-House man, a Six Nations Indian of Canada speaks his mind," about the relationship of Christianity and the long-house religion; Speck's correspondence with William N. Fenton, principally concerning field work among the Catawba, Cherokee, and Houma but also touching on Fenton's Seneca field work, Speck's various studies of the Haudenosaunee, and the Second Conference on Iroquois Research; correspondence with other anthropologists about various aspects of Haudenosaunee history and culture such as material culture specimens, archaeology, historical sources, agriculture, education, warfare, religion, population statistics, etc.; a draft of Speck's "Reflections on Iroquois religion" and related correspondence; an undated document describing a meeting of Delaware, Nanticoke, and Canadian Iroquois in the presence of Speck and recounting the injustices suffered by Indians in United States and Canada; a copy of a 1777 treaty made by Peter F. Timothy, a Moravian Delaware, in August 1888, and transmitted to Speck by Jesse Moses; and Speck's research notes and other miscellaneous correspondence on topics such as masks, art, museum specimens, hunting territory, chiefships, words, warfare with the Abenaki, the Delaware-as-women theme, academic publications and conferences, etc.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Six Nations
Language(s): English
Date: 1890
Type:Text
Extent: 1 volume (251 pages)
Description: Notes taken for the eleventh Census of the U.S., 22nd Division. It lists chiefs, crops, population, diseases, houses, other property and values of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) in New York.
Collection: Notes on the Six Nations (New York), 1890, successors to the Five Nations which once constituted the League or Confederacy of the "Iriquois" [sic].... (Mss.970.4.C23)

Oneida | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Six Nations
Language(s): English
Date: August 9, 1770; October 28, 1787; July 1798;
Type:Text
Extent: 3 items
Description: Materials can be found in the finding aid under the specific dates listed. Late 18th century items relating to missionary efforts among Oneidas. Topics include Indians' hope to hear Whitefield preach (thwarted when he went on to Boston because no congress was to be held at Sir William Johnson's); Rev. Samuel Kirkland; Minto's belief that Oneida share a common origin with Europeans because they identify Great and Small Bear by the same image; and Quaker missionaries' offer to set up a blacksmith shop to train Indians, to find iron, and to apprentice Indians as farmers.
Collection: Miscellaneous Manuscripts Collection (Mss.Ms.Coll.200)

Blackfoot | Dakota | Walla Walla | Nez Perce | Mandan | Shoshone | Hidatsa | Arikara | Crow | Chinook | Wishram | Assiniboine | Sahaptin | Pawnee | Osage | Kickapoo | Omaha | Lakota | Cheyenne | Arapaho | Kiowa | Ojibwe | Cree | A'aninin | Salish | Meskwaki
Alternate forms: Atsina, Gros Ventre, Sioux, Flathead, Sauk-and-Fox
Language(s): English
Date: 1804-1806
Type:Text
Extent: 6 red morocco book; 80 pages; 3 notebooks; 1 volume;
Description: The Plains materials in the Lewis and Clark journals includes observations on the Arikaras, Assiniboines, Blackfoot, Mandan, Minnetaree, Shoshoni, Blackfoot, Flathead-Tushepaw, Dakota Sioux, Mandan, and Minnetaree, Otos, Sauks, Iowa, Kansas, Kickapoo, Missouri, Omaha, Osage, Pawnees, Ponca, Sioux, Cheyenne (Arapaho), Arikara, Blackfoot, Crow, Kansas, Kiowa, Sioux, Yankton, Memacarjo, Teton, Waupatone, Cascarba, Sisseton, Waupacootar, Hoindeborto, Tecarton, Newastarton, Micacuopsiba, and Siouan, Minnetaree (Gros Ventre), Shoshoni, Assiniboine, Teton Sioux, Mandan, Hidatsa, Showhoni, Arikara, Castahan, Crow, Flathead (Tushepaw), Ootlashoot. The correspondence includes Two letters of Lewis to Jefferson at conclusion of expedition. Replies to questions 6, 7, and 8 concerning Place names and measurement of time and distance; Indian songs. Probably an enclosure in Clark to Biddle, December 7, 1810, printed in Jackson (1962m): 562-564. For Biddle queries see Jackson (1962): 550-554. Mentions Snake, Shoshoni, Castahana, Nemison, Crow or Arpsarrozah, Maw or Pashapalorah. Refers to Indians of Missouri River only: Kanzes, Oto, Missouri, Ponca, Panias (Loups, Republicans), Mahars, Ricares, Mandan, Minetares, Maharha, Ayhawies, Saukes and Reynards, Assiniboine, Christinoes, Cheyenne, Cannarwesh. Mentions Snake Indians. 24 tribes are listed with population, trade, language, and character information included in parallel columns: Osage, Kansas, Otto, Panias, Mahas, Poncaro, Ricaras, Mandans, Ahwahhawa, Minnetaree, Iowa, Saukie; Sioux (Wahparton, Mindawarcarton, Wahpacta, Sissatoni, Yankton, Yankton ah nah, Teton, Teton O Kandandas, Teton Minzarkine, Teton sah one.) Indian tribes mentioned: Cataka, Castahana, Anauawa, Mahar, Sharah-Cheyenne, Ricares, Panias (Loups, Republicans), Padoucas, Cayauwas, Wetapato, Cannavich, Stateton. Mentions Arikara, Gros Ventres, Mandan, Marhaha, Minnetaree, Sioux, and Teton in diary.Arikara (Beuffles de Medecine lodge), Aunahhow or Aunerhoo, Nootarwau, Toowarsar, Tohpahcass, Weheskeu, Wetersoon, (Hidatsa), Arapaho, Assiniboine, Cheyenne, Chippewa, Cree, Crow, Fox, Paduca, Pawnee, Sioux (Sisseton, Teton), Mandan, Minnetaree (Gros Ventre), Shoshoni. Includes list of nations who trade with Arikaras: Aunerhoo, Nootarwau, Toowarsar, Tohpahcass, Weheeskeu-chien, Kunnanarwesh (Arapaho), Tochewahcoo (Fox), Cattarkah (Paducar), Kiewah, Sharhachien. Discusses Arikara, Cheyenne, Comanche, Crow, Kansas, Kickapoo, Mandan, Minnetaree, Omaha, Osage, Dakota, and Teton and Yankton Sioux. Includes list of Crow bands: Shiptahcha, Apsharookee (Absaroka). Also Ecupscuppeah (Tushepaw band) together with locations. Draft list of Western Indians and their locations in Summary of Rivers (Codex N:128-142): Chillatehokle, Potoash, Queets (Quaitson), Pailish, Chiltz, Clamoitomicks, Quinechart, Kilamox. Tribes noted: Ahaharopinopah (Crow band), Alabama, Atacapa, Biloxi, Blood, Cadoquies, Cahokia, Castapanas, Cataka (Haka, Catteka), Cattanahaw, Cherokee, Choctaw, Choketartowomb, Conchates, Creek, Dotames (Dotama, a Paduca group), Ehartsar (Crow band), Esahatenketarpar (Teton Sioux), Hahahartone (Yankton Sioux), Honetaparteen (Yankton, also Honetaparteenwas), Kaskaskia, Keenkesah (Mindawarcarton Sioux), Lalplay (group of Alitan-Snake), Mahtahton (Sioux), Manetopar (Assiniboine-Band lar Gru), Menesharne (Teton Sioux), Miahkeejocksah (Wahpocoota Sioux), Nacota Mahtopanarto (Assiniboine) and Nacota Oseegah, Natchez (Chitemacha), Nemousin (see also Kiowa, Staeton), Noota (Crow band), Otaharton (Wahpatone Sioux), Ozash (Teton Sioux), Pareescar (Crow), Peoria Sahonehontaparpar (Teton Sioux), Sahown (Teton Sioux), Sheo (Teton Sioux), Sosobubar and Sosona (Shoshoni tribe), Tackchandessechar (Sioux-Teton), Tarcoimboto (Yankton Sioux), Tarcoehparh (Teton), Tintahton (Mindawarcarton Sioux), Touincas, Wauneewackataonelar (Teton), Warchinktarhe (Teton), Wetapahatoes and Kiowa (branch of Padouca?), Zaartar (Yankton).Ethnographic materials include a list of natural history specimens sent on November 16, 1805, to the American Philosophical Society by Captain Lewis. 2 pages, copy of Lewis to Jefferson, March 5, 1805, Fort Mandan. Answers written at Fort Mandan to queries concerning Indian land ownership, trade, cultivation, mode of life, mode of taking game, mode of warfare, origins, burial customs, houses, superstitions, modes of punishment, trade, treatment of whites. Data arranged in tabular form with diary observations arranged in one column, 28 pages. Ledger entries comment on plants, giving Kickapoo and Chippewa plant names; 10 pages dated 1800. Ancient fortification on BonHomme Island, the original draft of which is to be found on reverse of Clark's estimate of the western Indians. Mentions Salteaux, Sioux, Mandan, Assiniboine, Oto, Maha, Ponca, Shivitans, Crows, Caneenawees, Shayehn. Printed, Quaife (1916a). See also Jackson (1962): 155-156 for further data. A list of the names of the different nations and tribes of Indians...expressive of the names, languages, numbers, trade, water courses. A large chart listing 72 tribes with parallel columns giving various data. On reverse side only tribes 1-52 are considered, as remainder are Louisiana tribes rather than Missouri and Rocky Mountain Indians. A draft of the "Statistical Estimate..." printed as part of Thomas Jefferson, Message of the President...(February 17, 1806): 9-47. Geographic materials include An account of location of tributaries of the Missouri above Fort Mandan prepared in 1805. This draft appears to antedate the fuller statement in Codex O: 117-128, and supplements the "Summary Statement of the Rivers and Creeks." A lengthy description and list of distances of tributaries of the Missouri from St. Charles to Fort Mandan; an earlier version of the formal statement in Codex O: 69-116 by Lewis. Early draft of Summary Statement of Rivers..."A Summary View of the Rivers and Creeks," pages 69-128; mentions old villages of Missouri and Kansas; recommends trading posts for Oto, Missouri, Poncaras, Panies (Proper, Republican, and Loups), Mahas, Yankton Ahnahs. Mentions Yankton, Sisseton, and Teton Sioux as well as Minnetarees, Mandans, and Ahwahharwas. Pages 116-128 based on Indian information; mentions Flatheads. Probably composed at Fort Mandan, 1804-1805. A translation extracted from journal of James MacKay describing trade route through Lake Superior to the Grand Portage; recording stay with Mandans, Manitouris, and Wattassons in 1797. Includes extract of journal of John Evans, 1796, who visited the Arikaras. Notes by John Hay and his "Description of the route from Mackinac to the Grand Portage," etc., taken by him in 1794.
Collection: Lewis and Clark Journals (Mss.917.3.L58)

Purepecha
Alternate forms: Tarascan, Tarasco
Language(s): Purepecha | Spanish | English
Date: 1939-1940
Type:Text
Extent: 5 notebooks, 26 loose pages, 1000 slips
Description: The Tarascan materials in the ACLS collection consists of items found in the "Tarascan" section of the finding aid. "Tarascan ethnologic and linguistic notes" contains linguistic forms, terms for parents, vocabulary of 600 items, list of names of natural and cultural obiects, and interviews and material on land division and agriculture. There is also a Purépecha-Spanish lexical file of over 1000 word slips, plus brief additional writings, including a handbook for writing the language. In the “Mexico” section of the finding aid, see “Comparative vocabularies of various Indian languages of Mexico,” which includes Purépecha vocabulary.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)