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Creek | Choctaw
Language(s): English
Date: 1798-1810
Type:Text
Extent: 285 pages
Description: Original in possession of Independence National Historical Park. Letter book kept by Hawkins at the Creek Agency relating to Indian affairs, including outgoing letters, memoranda, and speeches to and from the Creeks and Choctaws. Topics include an attempt to survey the St. Mary's River and Spanish-U.S. relations. Includes a "sketch" of the Indians at the Creek Agency discussing political organization, agriculture, manufacture, public establishments, and justice. Materials written variously at Fort Wilkinson, Tukabatchee, and Coweta.
Collection: Benjamin Hawkins letterbook, 1798-1810 (Mss.Film.680)

Caddo | Creek | Natchez | Biloxi | Adai
Language(s): English | French
Date: 1821-1822
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 3 items
Description: Notes concerning Indian nations given to Peter S. Du Ponceau by Mr. Darby, giving locations of Caddo, Inies [?], Natchitoches, Apalachicolas, and Biloxi; a letter from Du Ponceau to John Sibley seeking Caddo and Natchez vocabularies of 150 words each and giving classes (from Jefferson word list?); and a letter from Du Ponceau to Friedrich von Adelung transmitting two of Sibley's manuscript vocabularies, Caddo and Adayes [Adai], and noting that his brother, Le Chevalier Du Ponceau, has prepared a translation of Heckewelder (1819).
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Cayuga | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: Undated
Type:Text
Extent: 1 page
Description: Memorandum of conversation with Judge Peters [probably Judge Richard Peters of Pennsylvania] to the effect that Thomas Jefferson was unjustly charged with fabricating Logan's speech [presumably the well-known and controversial speech often called "Logan's Lament."]. Peters claimed he had seen it printed as part of a treaty long before.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Cherokee
Language(s): English | Cherokee
Date: 1818-1899
Type:Text
Extent: 8 items
Description: Items relating to Cherokee materials at the American Philosophical Society. Topics include a memorandum and letters written by Peter Stephen du Ponceau regarding Native languages, especially Cherokee; Du Ponceau, Abbe Correia da Serra, and John Vaughan's visit with two Cherokee boys being sent to school in Connecticut. One (Leonard Hicks) referred du Ponceau to Butrick's Cherokee grammar; D. S. Butrick's plan to prepare a Cherokee grammar modeled on Zeisberger's Delaware grammar, and other information on Cherokee language that he sent to du Ponceau upon the latter's request; Butrick's hope that these studies will aid the Cherokees, and his plea for attention to Cherokees seeking Christ; Frank Cushing's inquiries about a William Bartram manuscript once in possession of Samuel G. Morton according to notes of Ephraim G. Squier, and about a John H. Payne manuscript on Cherokees; and James Mooney's request about the location of John Howard Payne's manuscript on the Cherokee which was cited in Ephraim G. Squier's Serpent Symbol (1851). Other individuals mentioned include Colonel Return Jonathan Meigs, John Gambold, Isaac Minis Hays, and Rev. Samuel Worcester.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Lenape | Onondaga | Munsee | Haudenosaunee | Arawak | Natchez | Yuchi | Ojibwe | Mahican
Alternate forms: Lenape, Iroquois, Six Nations
Language(s): English | Delaware | Onondaga | Munsee
Date: 1800-1893
Type:Text
Extent: 21 items
Description: Items relating to Delaware materials at the American Philosophical Society. Topics include requests for materials (a loan of a map of the "Indian Walk," or Walking Purchase, 1737; the Society of the United Brethren for Propagating the Gospel Among the Heathens wants the return of documents deposited by the Brethren for Heckewelder as listed in the Transactions of the Historical and Literary Committee of the American Philosophical Society 1); requests for information (on David Zeisberger as a missionary to the Indians); of materials (Zeisberger's Delaware grammar; John G. E. Heckewelder's paper on Personal names; Heckewelder's edits in case of a second edition of his Account of the Indian nations (1819)); donated materials (Roth's "Life of Christ" in Delaware, #1176; a French translation of Heckewelder's account done by Chevalier John Du Ponceau; materials from Heckwelder himself; documents relating to the Paxton boys from Samuel Fisher; authentic extracts of official Swedish papers relative to their settlements in America as well as translations of extracts of Acrelius (1759)); Heckewelder's Delaware grammar and work in general; a list of botanical names with equivalents in Delaware, Onondaga, and occasionally Munsee; Matthew S. Henry's work on a dictionary of Place names (#1164) and his comparison of Heckwelder and Rev. Jesse Vogler; and Peter S. du Ponceau's own work on Native languages (mentions Delaware, Arawak, Natchez, Yuchi, Ojibwe, and Mahican) and his work for the APS. Other individuals mentioned include Robert M. Patterson, Zaccheus Collins, Mathew Carey, Daniel G. Brinton, Sir William Johnson, Severin Lorich, Charles Pickering, Samuel S. Haldeman, Rev. der Schweinitz, Usher Parsons, and John Vaughan.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Lenape | Haudenosaunee | Cayuga | Miami | Shawnee | Nanticoke | Mohawk | Seneca | Susquehannock | Piscataway
Alternate forms: Conestoga, Lenape, Iroquois, Conoy
Language(s): English
Date: 1725-1759
Type:Text
Extent: 27 items
Description: Correspondence and other materials relating to Indian affairs. Topics include land claims; treaties and diplomatic conferences; Indian complaints of dispossession and mistreatment; "Minguay" expense of Indian diplomacy; illness and death of Allumapis; Conrad Weiser's activities in the service of the colony; Delawares and other Indians in Ohio; hanging of Indian in New Jersey; efforts to make Six Nations "overlords" of Pennsylvania's nearer Native neighbors; the Walking Purchase; Shawnees making trouble; fears of Indians going over to the French. Individuals mentioned include Allumapis, Christopher Pyrlaeus, Conrad Weiser, Shickellamy, Teedyuscung, Christopher Stump, Hugh Jones, Mannakahickan, Broken Thigh, Captain Newcastle, James Logan, Governor Ogle; Nutimus.
Collection: Selections from the correspondence of the Honourable James Logan, 1699-1750 (Mss.B.L82)

Natchez | Choctaw | Chickasaw | Yuchi | Lenape | Cherokee | Creek | Osage
Language(s): English | French
Date: 1792-1897
Extent: 28 items
Description: Items relating to materials about the Native peoples of Eastern North America. Topics include papers and articles, particularly those considered for publication (on the relation of pentagonal dodecahedron found near Marietta, Ohio, to shamanism; memoir on aboriginal monuments; memoir of Dr. Charles D. Meigs on bones and burial customs; multiple items regarding a letter from S. P. Hullihen to Dr. Richard Harlan regarding inscription on a stone found at Grave Creek near Wheeling, and Thomas Townsend's claim to prior publication rights to Grave Creek inscription; Caleb Forshey's paper describing a great mound in Adams County, Mississippi; Cushing's publication on exploration of ancient key dwellers' remains on the Gulf Coast of Florida; a response to Henry Phillips' article on supposed runic inscriptions at Yarmouth, Nova Scotia); requests for information or materials (Samuel Miller's request for copies of designated Indian vocabularies of Delaware, Cherokee, Creek, Chickasaw, Choctaw, and Osage, for training missionaries of United Foreign Missionary Society); donations to APS ("curiosities" taken from Indian grave near Cincinnati; relics and fossil shells found in Huntingdon County, West Virginia;"western productions"); Peter S. du Ponceau's work on Southern Indian languages and customs (including Creek, Natchez, Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Yuchi), Indian vocabularies, and for APS; information from Judge William C. Frazer (Wisconsin Territory, Superior County), concerning discovery of burned bricks in Aztalan Mound, Jefferson County, Wisconsin; Cutler's estimation of age of Ohio mounds referred to in Barton (1787) using tree-ring dating; sketch of the plan of an ancient work three miles southeast of Lexington (Kentucky); American Antiquarian Society's plans to publish a volume on mounds based on Caleb Atwater's data; and comparative vocabularies of British Columbia tribes. Other individuals mentioned include Murray, Duralde, Colonel Smith, Benjamin Hawkins, Robley Dunglison, Isaac Lea, Benjamin W. Richards, George M. Wharton, Nathaniel Ware, General Wayne, Dr. Tolmie, George M. Dawson, and Abelard Tomlinson.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Haudenosaunee | Oneida | Onondaga | Seneca | Mohawk | Tuscarora | Nottoway
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Onkwehón:we
Language(s): English
Date: 1816-1820
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 6 items
Description: Items relating to Haudenosaunee materials, mostly the correspondence of Peter S. du Ponceau as he sought to obtain linguistic materials. This includes an exchange with Jason Chamberlain, who was referred to du Ponceau by Thomas Jefferson, mentioning an "Indian spelling book" [Gaiatonsera (1813)] and Eleazer Williams; a letter to Williams listing Iroquois works at the American Philosophical Society and requesting "more data"; a letter to Joseph P. Norris asking for records pertaining to the conference between Scaroyady of the Six Nations and some members of the Society of Friends [for reply, see also Norris to Du Ponceau, June 19, 1818]; a letter to Jefferson forwarding comparative Iroquoian vocabularies (Oneida, Onondaga, Seneca, Mohawk, Tuscarora with Nottoway); and a memorandum by du Ponceau concerning H. G. Spofford's (of Albany) directions to contact Eleazer Williams (Oneida Castle, Oneida New York) for Indian vocabularies.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Haudenosaunee | Tuscarora | Seneca | Cayuga | Mohawk | Oneida | Onondaga
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1668-1990, bulk circa 1936-1974
Description: The Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers are a vast collection of materials relating to Wallace's work at the intersection of anthropology, psychology, and history, among other interests. Haudenosaunee materials include items relating to Wallace's particular interests in the Tuscarora and the Seneca, and can be difficult to disentangle from items organized by subject, such as personality, religion, and cultural revitalization. Researchers should therefore also see the Wallace Papers entries for the Tuscarora and Seneca, and consult the finding aid for a detailed discussion of Wallace's career and for an itemized list of the collection's contents. Materials explicitly linked to the Haudenosaunee can be found throughout Series I. Correspondence, especially in the correspondence with William N. Fenton, Merle H. Deardorff, Francis Jennings, Mina Brayley Smith, and Wallace's father, historian Paul A. W. Wallace. Other relevant correspondence files include those for Aren Akweks (Ray Fadden), the American Philosophical Society, Michael Ames, Edmund Snow Carpenter, Dwight Lewis, Chamberlain, Malcolm Collier, Charles Congdon, Jesse Cornplanter, Robert T. Coulter, Myrtle Crouse, Norma Cuthbert, Hazel Dean-John, Vine Deloria, Michael K. Foster, John F. Freeman, Joseph Chamberlain Furnas, Bob Gabor, Charles Garrad, C. Marshall Gorman, Randy Gorske, Barbara Graymont, Jeannette Henry, N. Perry Jemison, Francis Jennings, Randy Alan John, Gertrude Kurath, Weston La Barre, David Landry, Gardiner Lindzey, Floyd G. Lounsbury, Franklin O. Loveland, Charles Lucy, Nancy Lurie, Benjamin Malzberg, Henry Manley, Jane Ann McGettrick, Ernest Miller, Stephen Murray, Oscar Nephew, New York State Library, Niagara County Historical Society, Arthur Caswell Parker, Arthur Piepkorn, Richard Pilant, Susan Postal, V. R. Potmis, Frederic Pryor, Martha Randle, Paul G. Reilly, Egon Renner, Alex and Catherine H. Ricciardelli, Cara Richards, Sally M. Rogow, Anne Marie Shimony, John Sikes, Florence Smith, Mrs. Douglas Snook, Patricia Snyder-Freeman, Frank Speck, George Dearborn Spindler, William Sturtevant, Elizabeth Tooker, Eula Tottingham, Allen W. Trelease, University of Pennsylvania Press, Shirley Vanatta, A. Jeanne Weissinger, C. A. Weslager, and Susan Williams. There is also a great deal on Haudenosaunee peoples in Series II. Research Notes and Drafts, particularly relating to Wallace's monographs on the Tuscarora and Seneca. Subseries A. Indian Research primarily contains Haudenosaunee-related materials, including notes and field notes from research trips to Iroquoia and to archives, copies of and extracts from primary and secondary sources, notes on what Wallace called his "Iroquois Research Project," field notes and materials compiled by Paul A. W. Wallace, etc. There is also some Haudenosaunee material in Subseries B. Revitalization and Culture, mostly in form of secondary sources, including "History of the St. Regis Reservation and several Iroquois pamphlets and drawings" by Mohawk Aren Akweks (aka). Series III. Notecards contains index cards with notes on primary and secondary sources on a range of topics, including Wallace's research interests in revitalization, culture and personality, and his work on Indian land claims, all of which touch on the Haudenosaunee. Several drafts of Wallace's work on the Haudenosaunee and other indigenous peoples can be found in Series IV. Works by Wallace A. Professional, along with fictional works in B. Creative Writing and C. Juvenilia of the same series. Series VI. Consulting and Committee Work A. American Anthropological Association contains two folders labeled "Iroquois Wampum," which contain materials relating to Onondaga demands for the return of wampum belts held by the New York State Museum. Wallace publicly supported the Haudenosaunee, in direct opposition to many scholars, including his friend William Fenton, who argued that the NYSM had saved and maintained the belts and should continue in that role. Correspondence, drafts of Wallace's statement, and other items reveal many factors at play: Vine Deloria, Jr.'s involvement; Haudenosaunee youth involved in the red power movement; inter-tribal divisions about the fate of the belts; scholarly disagreement about how best to serve both Native and non-Native members of the public; ideas about the roles of museums in preserving and protecting cultural materials; anxieties about the implications of Wallace's stance for ethnological museum collections in general; the legal dimensions of deaccessioning bequests; and more. [See Wallace's correspondence with Fenton and others in Series I. Correspondence for more on this issue.] Subseries C. Other Committees of the same series includes files on the Iroquois Conference 1946-1961. Series IX. Indian Claims contains over 50 folders of research materials, dockets, trial memoranda, etc., relating to Wallace's work as an expert witness for Haudenosaunee land claims. Series XI. Maps also contains materials pertaining to Haudenosaunee land claims, as well as to Wallace's personal research. Finally, Series XII. Graphics includes watercolor paintings by Ray Fadden's (Mohawk, aka Aren Akweks) son John (Mohawk, aka Ka-Hon-Hes), original drawings by Seneca Jesse Cornplanter and Tuscarora Nellie Gansworth, and photographs associated with Paul A.W. Wallace's fieldwork among the Indians of Pennsylvania, New York State, and Ontario as well as Anthony F.C. Wallace's research (1947-1985) on American Indians including several photographs of Tuscaroras, Senecas, a cradleboard, and pictographs. Additional material may be found in other places in the collections.
Collection: Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.64a)

Haudenosaunee | Nanticoke | Shawnee | Lenape | Wyandot | Miami | Seneca
Alternate forms: Iroquois: Lenape
Language(s): English
Date: 1790-1976
Type:Text
Extent: 4 reels
Description: These papers include letters, reports, minutes, memoranda, and addresses to Indian chiefs, selected from the Pickering papers from the Massachusetts Historical Society and from the Essex Institute. Includes letters and documents pertaining to Pickering, Henry Knox, John Sergeant, Jasper Parrish and Samuel Kirkland; relates to New York and Western Indian affairs, principally Iroquois, but also Nanticoke, Shawano [Shawnee], Delaware, Wyandot, Miami, Seneca. Originals at the Massachusetts Historical Society (3 reels) and Essex Institute, Salem, Massachusetts (1 reel). See also Fenton (1953).
Collection: Papers, 1790-1796, on Indian affairs (Mss.Film.638 & 645)