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A'aninin
Alternate forms: Gros Ventre
Language(s): English
Date: September 9-10, 1805
Type:Text
Genre: Journals
Extent: 4 pages
Description: Minnetaree, Flathead (Tushepaw), Snake.
Collection: Lewis and Clark Journals (Mss.917.3.L58)

Otomi | Chitimacha | Atakapa | Cherokee | Osage | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Nottoway | Kaw | Omaha | Dakota | Pawnee | Nanticoke | A'aninin | Miami | Mi'kmaq | Seminole | Quapaw | Yuchi | Delaware | Ojibwe | Shawnee | Seneca | Mohawk | Onondaga | Cayuga | Oneida | Tuscarora | Natchez | Wyandot | Creek | Mohican | Mohegan
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Ojibwa, Huron-Wyandot, Atsina, Gros Ventre, Micmac, Lenape
Date: 1798-1821
Type:Text
Extent: 219 pages
Description: This volume contains extracts of Benjamin Smith Barton's "New Views of the Origin of the Tribes and Nations of America" (Philadelphia, 1797), with additions by Peter S. Du Ponceau. The bulk of the volume is comprised of word list of 54 words with equivalents listed in a range of 50-70 languages. While Barton listed no authority, Du Ponceau cited sources. Languages with words listed include Chitimacha, Atakapa, Cherokee, Osage, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Nottoway, Kansa, Omaha, Dakota, Pawnee, Nanticoke, Gros Ventres, Miami, Mi'kmaq, Seminole, Quapaw, Yuchi, Delaware, Ojibwe, Shawnee, Seneca, Mohawk, Onondaga, Cayuga, Oneida, Tuscarora, Natches, Wyandot, Creek, Mahican, Mohegan, and many others. The word list includes the terms for God, heaven, and sky, as well as various terms relating to kinship, parts of the body, weather, and more. The volume also includes notes on sounds of the Otomi (Othomi) observations on declension; observations about the Omaha, Kansa, Oto, Arkansas, and Missouri languages; and notes on symbol and sound. Also includes a newspaper clipping of a review (in German) of Barton's "New Views" that appeared in "Göttingische Anzeigen von gelehrten Sachen," June 17, 1799.
Collection: A comparative vocabulary of Indian languages (Mss.497.B28)

Choctaw
Language(s): English
Date: 1769
Contributor: Gauld, George
Subject: Geography | Trade
Type:Text
Genre: Essays
Extent: 1 volume
Description: Admiralty surveyor. Mentions southern tribes and Indian trade.
Collection: A general description of the sea-coasts, harbours, lakes, rivers, etc. of the province of West Florida (Mss.917.59.G23)

Oneida | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1926
Type:Text
Extent: 1 reel
Description: Read before the Northampton Historical Society on January 28, 1926, this typescript essay presents the life of a man who was raised by Oneida Indians, missionary and interpreter James Dean (1748-1823) of Westmoreland, New York. It contains a version of the Oneida creation myth. Original in possession of Benjamin D. Meritt, Princeton, N.J.
Collection: A New England pioneer among the Oneida Indians, 1926 (Mss.Film.1101)

Seminole
Language(s): English
Date: 1818
Contributor: Young, Hugh, -1822
Type:Text
Extent: 125 pages
Description: Hugh Young was an army officer and topographical engineer accompanying General Andrew Jackson's army in its operations against the Seminoles. This memoir includes sections on East Florida's boundaries, physical characteristics, navigation, Native customs, Spanish settlements, African Americans, agricultural products, and climate. Also included are itineraries for East and West Florida. One chapter is devoted to the Seminole and other aboriginal inhabitants of Florida, and includes names, numbers, settlements, war and treaties, councils, marriage, trade, amusement, etc. (pages 48-73). Printed, Boyd (1934). Original document owned by Francis W. Rawle, Albany, circa 1954. Also found on this reel is Benjamin Hawkins' Journal of occurrences in the Creek agency from January to the conclusion of the conference and treaty at Fort Williamson, 1802 (Film 692a).
Collection: A topographic memoir on East and West Florida, 1818 (Mss.Film.692b)

Mingo | Susquehannock | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Conestoga, Iroquois
Language(s): English | Tuscarora | Mohawk
Date: 1757-1771
Contributor: Sack, William
Type:Text
Extent: 1 vol., 10 p.
Description: Notebook with memorandum book, Fort Augusta, 1757-1771. Reference is made to Edward Shippen, Jr.; includes Tuscarora and Mohawk numerals; all copied in Indian vocabularies (Mss.497.In2). Memorandum book carries list of obligations, November 1764 - May 4, 1771. The vocabulary was taken from Will Sack, a Conestoga Indian, in January 1757 at Fort Augusta in the midst of the Seven Years' War. Sack would later become a controversial figure in Pennsylvania history. The Paxton Boys claimed he was a murderer and used his presence in the Conestoga's camp as pretext for their assault on the Conestoga Indians. The memorandum book contains the financial transactions of an unknown individual during the 1760s, although some evidence suggests that Edward Burd kept this memorandum book and vocabulary.
Collection: A vocabulary in the Mingo tongue taken from the mouth of William Sack, a Canistogo Indian. . . and memorandum book (Mss.497.3.V852m)

Meskwaki | Sauk
Alternate forms: Fox, Sac
Language(s): English | Meskwaki
Date: Undated
Contributor: Unknown
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 27 pages
Description: This volume contains Sac [Sauk] and Fox words with their English equivalents. It likely dates to the nineteenth century. One of the more notable features of this collection is that it includes words for relatively recent inventions, such as the steam boat. A note inside the back cover states "C.S.F. to Mrs. S.," asking her to excuse the "erroz in Spelling They are not mind (sic.). written on the night of my return from a memorable Expedition."
Collection: A vocabulary of the most common words in use among the Sac & Fox Indians, n.d. (Mss.497.F11)

Cherokee | Cheyenne | Ojibwe | Choctaw | Dakota | Osage | Pawnee | Ponca | Potawatomi | Meskwaki | Seminole | Ute
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Ojibway, Sioux, Fox
Language(s): English
Date: 1852-1869
Extent: 0.5 linear feet, 96 photographs
Description: Artist Antonio Zeno Shindler worked at the Smithsonian Institution from after the Civil War until the turn of the 20th century, specializing in ethnographic subjects. He was responsible for printing or taking a large number of photographs of American Indians exhibited there in 1869. The 95 studio portraits in the Shindler Collection were part of a suite of 301 images that comprised the first photographic exhibition at the Smithsonian, and that are documented in the catalogue Photographic Portraits of North American Indians in the Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution (1867). The individuals depicted were members of delegations sent to Washington during the years 1852, 1857-1858, and 1867-1869 from the following nations: Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chippewa (Ojibwe), Choctaw, Dakota Sioux (Brule, Miniconjou, Sans Arc, Santee, Sisseton, Two-Kettle, Yankton), Osage, Pawnee, Ponca, Potawatomi, Sac and Fox, Seminole, and Ute. Shindler printed the earlier photographs (mostly taken by the McClees Gallery) and was photographer for the later delegations. See the finding aid for more information. All of the photographs in this collection have been digitized and are in the APS Digital Library.
Collection: A. Zeno Shindler American Indian Photograph Collection (Mss.970.1.Sh6)

Maya | Mixtec
Language(s): French
Date: 1859-1882
Extent: 2.0 linear feet, 123 photographs
Description: A traveler, archaeologist, and photographer, Désiré Charnay (1828-1915) was one of the most important early expeditionary photographers. During his tours of Yucatan, Oaxaca, and Chiapas in 1858-1860 and 1880-1886, Charnay became one of the first to use photography in documenting the great Meso-American archaeological sites and to make ethnographic photographs of indigenous Mexicans. This collection of photographs is representative of the range of images he took of Meso-American archaeological sites during three tours of Mexico in 1858-1860 and 1880-1886. Although some of the images have suffered an unfortunate degree of fading, they convey the power and fascination that these sites held for Charnay and his contemporaries, and include some of the best early examples of the use of photography in the documentation of Mexican archaeology. The collection includes images of the sites at Tula, Teotihuacan, Iztaccihuatl, Chichen Itza, Comalcalco, and Palenque; of archaeological specimens held at the Museum of Mexico; of landscape and villages in Yucatan, Chiapas, and Oaxaca; and of a series of Lacandon, Mayan, Mixtec, and Yucatec "racial types." The collection was apparently assembled by the scientist Griffith Evans Abbot (1850-1927), who presented them to the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. The 15 cartes de visite included in the collection, mostly portraits taken in Peru, Chile, and Madeira, bear an uncertain relationship to the Charnay images, and are probably present simply because they were also once owned by Abbot. All images have been digitized and are available through the APS Digital Library.
Collection: Abbot-Charnay Photograph Collection (Mss.913.72.Ab23)

Abenaki | Wabanaki
Alternate forms: Abnaki
Language(s): Abenaki, Western | English
Date: 1911
Type:Text
Extent: 1 notebook
Description: The Abenaki materials in the ACLS collection are found in the "Algonkian" section of the finding aid among Sapir's "Iroquois, Algonquian and Siouan field notes," which contain vocabulary and text recorded in Pierreville (or Odanak), Quebec.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)