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Abenaki | Wabanaki
Alternate forms: Abnaki
Language(s): Abenaki, Western | English
Date: 1911
Type:Text
Extent: 1 notebook
Description: The Abenaki materials in the ACLS collection are found in the "Algonkian" section of the finding aid among Sapir's "Iroquois, Algonquian and Siouan field notes," which contain vocabulary and text recorded in Pierreville (or Odanak), Quebec.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Achumawi | Atsugewi
Language(s): Achumawi | Atsugewi | English
Date: 1907, 1931-1935
Type:Text
Extent: 615 pages
Description: The Achumawi materials in the ACLS collection include a word list from the Pit River area; autobiographies of Willard Carmony, an Achumawi speaker, whose stories refers to being sent to Fort Bidwell Indian Boarding School; linguistic analysis of Achumawi's relationship to the Hokan lanugage family; conversational texts in the Achumawi language; free English translations; and grammars. Also included are notes on dialectical differences between Atwamdzini, Hammawi, Adzumawi. Tales, myths, and song texts, with interlinear and free translations. Materials located primarily in the "Achumawi" section of the finding aid. See also the "Atsugewi" section.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Achumawi
Alternate forms: Pit River
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1910s-1930s
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Description: This collection contains the bulk of correspondence between Franz Boas and his professional colleagues, though there are also other Boas collections in the library. The correspondents listed above contain some correspondence related to the culture or language listed in this entry. In the finding aid listings for some of these correspondents, the individual letters pertaining to this culture or language will be identified by a subject heading, though for some correspondents this indexing has not yet been completed. Some letters may contain only brief mentions of work being conducted in relation to the topic. Some additional correspondences in this collection that have not yet been indexed may also contain additional material.
Collection: Franz Boas Papers (Mss.B.B61)

Naskapi | Yurok
Language(s): English
Date: 1918-1945 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 10 items
Description: A variety of materials relating to Speck's study of diverse Algonquian peoples, cultures, and languages. Includes his "Remnants of the Eastern Indian Tribes," a brief discussion of location of New England Algonquians; his favorable review of John M. Cooper, "Snares, Deadfalls, and other Traps of Northern Algonquians and Northern Athapascans" [Printed, Speck (1939).]; a "Table of Double Curve Motif," charting techniques and variations of motifs of various Northwestern, Iroquoian, and central Algonquian peoples; a manuscript draft and additions of "Terms of relationship and the family territorial band among the Northeastern Algonquins," [Printed, Speck (1918).]; letters from Alanson Skinner challenging Speck's ethnic position of the Southeastern Algonquian on meaning of Eskimo-type artifacts found in Algonquian site in New York (State); materials from Eva L. Butler, including two pamphlets containing transcriptions of historical letters, principally from the Connecticut State Library--"Colonial Letters of our Ancestors" and "Letters of the Indians"--and "Botany and ethnozoology of the New England Indians," a bibliography of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century sources for ethnobotantical and ethnozoological references; letters from Edward Sapir concerning Speck (1918a), particularly Yurok comparisons, his excitement about reduction of language stocks, and possible typographical errors; and letters from Carl F. Voegelen concerning the usefulness of Speck's Naskapi material for comparative study of Algonquian languages and seeking an article on process by which Algonquian languages become extinct.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Algonquin
Language(s): English | Algonquin
Date: 1935 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 2 folders
Description: Two items relating to the Algonquin language have been identified in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. Both are in Subcollection II. Edward Sapir briefly mentions "Algonkin" in the context of his work on Blackfoot in Series I. Correspondence; and there is a copy of Leonard Bloomfield's 128-page "Algonquin" located in Series IV. Works by Others.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Alsea
Language(s): Alsea | English
Date: 1900, 1918
Type:Text
Extent: 428 pages
Description: The Alsea materials in the ACLS collection are located in the "Alsea" section of the finding aid. They consist of 2 items, the largest of which is Frachtenberg's "Yakonan (Alsea) grammar" intended for publication in Handbook of American Indian Languages, but never printed. Based on field work of J. Owen Dorsey (1884-Siletz, Oregon: vocabularies), Livingston Farrand (1900-Siletz reservation) and the author (1910). Table of contents, grammar, and texts with interlinear and free translations and grammatical notes. The collection also includes 6 pages of linguistic notes recorded by Edward Sapir in 1900.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Arapaho
Alternate forms: Arapahoe
Language(s): Arapaho | English
Date: 1939, 1950
Type:Text
Extent: 106 pages
Description: The Arapaho materials in the ACLS collection consist of two items found in the "Arapaho" section of the finding aid. The larger of the two is "Arapaho texts" recorded by Salzmann, including a sample of field notes with linguistic notes and texts collected at the Wind River Reservation, Wyoming, some of which were printed in 1958. There is also a brief manuscript, "Sapir on Arapaho," listing linguistic correspondences.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Beothuk
Date: 1915
Type:Text
Extent: 5 pages
Description: The Beothuk materials in the ACLS collection consist of one item in the "Algonkian" section of the finding aid, entitled "Beothuk-Algonkian comparisons." This document was prepared for Sapir, copied from Rev. John Leigh's transcription of John Peyton's vocabulary. It compares 45 Beothuk items with Montagnais and Penobscot as well as isolated Micmac, Ojibwe, and Abenaki equivalents.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Blackfoot | Ktunaxa | Kalispel | Salish | Séliš-Ql̓ispé
Alternate forms: Blackfeet, Flathead, Kootenai, Kootenay, Kutenai, Niitsitapi, Pend d'Oreille
Date: 1916
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 1 page
Description: The Blackfoot materials in the ACLS collection consists of 1 item in the "Blackfoot" section of the finding aid. This item is a 1-page word list recorded by Edward Sapir, comparing Blackfoot terms for the numerals 1-10 with the corresponding terms in Kutenai and Flathead Salish.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Blackfoot
Alternate forms: Siksika
Language(s): English | Blackfoot
Date: circa 1930s-1960s
Type:Text
Extent: 13 folders, 2 boxes
Description: The C. F. Voegelin Papers contain correspondence, card files, notes, notebooks, Vocabularies, and other linguistic and ethnographic materials relating to Blackfoot language and culture. These are located in both Subcollection I and Subcollection II of the Voegelin Papers. Materials in Subcollection I include 2 boxes of card files (mostly vocabulary) and 2 folders of document files in Series II. Card Files. Of particular interest in Folder #1 might be some notes on vocabulary and eight pages of an incomplete letter, apparently to Erminie Wheeler-Voegelin, from someone based at the Blackfoot agency doing fieldwork under the auspices of Clark Wissler and working with Mr. Calfchild. The writer mentions societies, exogamy, kinship, reciprocity, bands, etc. Folder #2 contains child-focused material including typed texts (mostly sporadic comments) obtained from children, fragments of typed observations about children's interactions and language use, and a two-page list of 24 Blackfoot children, with their full names, ages, and sometimes notes about their fluency or references to texts and other works for which these individuals were apparently consulted. There is also a bundle of texts, mostly about Blackfoot societies and their origins, labeled "Old Bull (Shultz's Informant)" [Possibly a reference to James Willard Schultz (1859-1947)]. Continuing with Subcollection I, there is also 1 folder of undated linguistic notes in Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-A: Language Notes; a folder containing the typed transcript of a dialogue (between children at play) between Velma Bear Hat and Margaret Water Chief in Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-B: Text; and 3 undated folders in Series VI. Notebooks (which were described in detail by Richard A. Rhodes, Department of Linguistics at the University of California-Berkeley, in 1988, and include vocabulary, stories, work on paradigms, vowel clusters, suffixes, numerals, kinship terms, and some ethnographic information in #3). Blackfoot materials in Subcollection II include correspondence with Oscar Lewis (regarding Blackfoot culture and linguistic classfication, particularly in relation to Kutenai, and including a paper Lewis sent and Voegelin's response) and Edward Sapir (mentioning work on Blackfoot, Algonquin and Wiyot) in Series I. Correspondence; and several folders in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries III. Macro-Algonquian. The latter contain Blackfoot grammatical notes, Blackfoot prefixes, sketches of Blackfoot designs, and 8 notebooks. Blackfoot notebooks 1-7 contain stories (Blackfoot with interlinear English), Vocabularies, and names of speakers, and a separate unnumbered Blackfoot notebook contains ethnographic notes in English, though some Blackfoot terms and phrases are included.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)