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Otomi | Chitimacha | Atakapa | Cherokee | Osage | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Nottoway | Kaw | Omaha | Dakota | Pawnee | Nanticoke | A'aninin | Miami | Mi'kmaq | Seminole | Quapaw | Yuchi | Delaware | Ojibwe | Shawnee | Seneca | Mohawk | Onondaga | Cayuga | Oneida | Tuscarora | Natchez | Wyandot | Creek | Mohican | Mohegan
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Ojibwa, Huron-Wyandot, Atsina, Gros Ventre, Micmac, Lenape
Date: 1798-1821
Type:Text
Extent: 219 pages
Description: This volume contains extracts of Benjamin Smith Barton's "New Views of the Origin of the Tribes and Nations of America" (Philadelphia, 1797), with additions by Peter S. Du Ponceau. The bulk of the volume is comprised of word list of 54 words with equivalents listed in a range of 50-70 languages. While Barton listed no authority, Du Ponceau cited sources. Languages with words listed include Chitimacha, Atakapa, Cherokee, Osage, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Nottoway, Kansa, Omaha, Dakota, Pawnee, Nanticoke, Gros Ventres, Miami, Mi'kmaq, Seminole, Quapaw, Yuchi, Delaware, Ojibwe, Shawnee, Seneca, Mohawk, Onondaga, Cayuga, Oneida, Tuscarora, Natches, Wyandot, Creek, Mahican, Mohegan, and many others. The word list includes the terms for God, heaven, and sky, as well as various terms relating to kinship, parts of the body, weather, and more. The volume also includes notes on sounds of the Otomi (Othomi) observations on declension; observations about the Omaha, Kansa, Oto, Arkansas, and Missouri languages; and notes on symbol and sound. Also includes a newspaper clipping of a review (in German) of Barton's "New Views" that appeared in "Göttingische Anzeigen von gelehrten Sachen," June 17, 1799.
Collection: A comparative vocabulary of Indian languages (Mss.497.B28)

Dane-Zaa
Alternate forms: Tsattine
Date: 2002
Subject: Linguistics
Extent: 5 compact discs (1 hr., 15 min.) : DIGITIZED
Description: Recordings of 5 speakers of Tsattine (Beaver) reading a word list to test for tone and dialect differences. Recorded in Doig River and Blueberry River, British Columbia, in July 2002. (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: A Survey of the Beaver Dialects With Respect to Tone Marking (Mss.Rec.284)

Mingo | Susquehannock | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Conestoga, Iroquois
Language(s): English | Tuscarora | Mohawk
Date: 1757-1771
Contributor: Sack, William
Type:Text
Extent: 1 vol., 10 p.
Description: Notebook with memorandum book, Fort Augusta, 1757-1771. Reference is made to Edward Shippen, Jr.; includes Tuscarora and Mohawk numerals; all copied in Indian vocabularies (Mss.497.In2). Memorandum book carries list of obligations, November 1764 - May 4, 1771. The vocabulary was taken from Will Sack, a Conestoga Indian, in January 1757 at Fort Augusta in the midst of the Seven Years' War. Sack would later become a controversial figure in Pennsylvania history. The Paxton Boys claimed he was a murderer and used his presence in the Conestoga's camp as pretext for their assault on the Conestoga Indians. The memorandum book contains the financial transactions of an unknown individual during the 1760s, although some evidence suggests that Edward Burd kept this memorandum book and vocabulary.
Collection: A vocabulary in the Mingo tongue taken from the mouth of William Sack, a Canistogo Indian. . . and memorandum book (Mss.497.3.V852m)

Meskwaki | Sauk
Alternate forms: Fox, Sac
Language(s): English | Meskwaki
Date: Undated
Contributor: Unknown
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 27 pages
Description: This volume contains Sac [Sauk] and Fox words with their English equivalents. It likely dates to the nineteenth century. One of the more notable features of this collection is that it includes words for relatively recent inventions, such as the steam boat. A note inside the back cover states "C.S.F. to Mrs. S.," asking her to excuse the "erroz in Spelling They are not mind (sic.). written on the night of my return from a memorable Expedition."
Collection: A vocabulary of the most common words in use among the Sac & Fox Indians, n.d. (Mss.497.F11)

Abenaki | Wabanaki
Alternate forms: Abnaki
Language(s): Abenaki, Western | English
Date: 1911
Type:Text
Extent: 1 notebook
Description: The Abenaki materials in the ACLS collection are found in the "Algonkian" section of the finding aid among Sapir's "Iroquois, Algonquian and Siouan field notes," which contain vocabulary and text recorded in Pierreville (or Odanak), Quebec.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Abenaki | Innu | Penobscot | Maliseet | Haudenosaunee | Wabanaki
Alternate forms: Abnaki
Date: 1914-1930
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: The Abenaki materials in the Hallowell Papers are mostly located in Series V, Research Files, in folders labled "Abenaki" and Series VI, Photographs, Subseries E "St. Francis Abenaki Album." These include linguistic, ethnographic, ethnobotanical, ceremonial knowledge, information on political organization, and historical materials. Of particular interest are a sketch of Abenaki history from 1600-1930 accompanied by detailed notes from secondary sources on 17th century Abenaki history. The linguistic materials include an analysis of how the language changed after contact with Catholic missionaries, Abenaki vocabulary related to body parts, Abenaki phonetics, and religious, medical, and kinship terminology. The ethnobotanical materials include a manuscript labled "Identity of animals and plants," and information concerning herbal medicine and its practitioners. There is a wealth of ethnographic materials that include drawings of pipes, descriptions of games, baketry and birch bark maks. There is descriptions of Abenaki music and diagrams of dances, as well as detailed descriptions of hunting techniques. Some of the genealogical materials contains lists of community members names and descriptions of marriage. Interspered throughout the folders labled "Abenaki" in the Research Files are interlinear translations of stories such as "Man who could Find Lost Objects," "Woman and Bear Lover" and numerous other stories. The materials on hunting include topics such as the use of snow shoes, preparation of moose hide,and techniques and drawings of trapping. The collections contain important information designation hunting territories and family names. Four folders contain detailed informaiton on kinship terms. Two folders on Measurements and Genealogical data contain lists of names. The folders labled "Linguistics" in Series V contain scattered information about Abenaki grammar. In Series VI, of 160 photographs taken at St. Francis, Odanak in the Centre-du-Québec region. The Abenaki people in the photographs are identified, in most cases, and also include depictions of traditional dress, buildings, clothing, baskets, and a wide variety of material culture. The corresondence, in Series I, includes letters from Gordon Day describing his collection of stories, regecordings, Vocabularies, and hunting territories. Henry Lorne Masta, one of Hallowell's Abenaki consultants, writes about culture and language.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Abenaki | Haudenosaunee | Wabanaki
Alternate forms: Abnaki
Date: 1884; 1959-1976; 1929
Type:Text
Extent: 1,300 pages; 1 microfilm reel
Description: The Abenaki materials in the Siebert Papers are located primarily in Series III and V. Ther are descriptions of wars with the Iroquois from the 17th century, linguistic materials, and stories. Series V includes 5 research notebooks containing historical notes and some linguistics materials.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Abenaki | Wabanaki
Alternate forms: Abnaki
Date: 1965-1966, undated
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 0.1 linear feet
Description: Mary Haas' Abenaki materials consist mostly of comparisons with other languages, particularly Proto-Algonquian and other languages of the eastern US. These can be found in Series 2 and Series 9, including a brief (ca.50-100 slip) lexical file of Abenaki. There is also correspondence in Series 1 and 9 with Gordon M. Day that includes Mi'kmaq comparisons.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Achumawi | Atsugewi
Language(s): Achumawi | Atsugewi | English
Date: 1907, 1931-1935
Type:Text
Extent: 615 pages
Description: The Achumawi materials in the ACLS collection include a word list from the Pit River area; autobiographies of Willard Carmony, an Achumawi speaker, whose stories refers to being sent to Fort Bidwell Indian Boarding School; linguistic analysis of Achumawi's relationship to the Hokan lanugage family; conversational texts in the Achumawi language; free English translations; and grammars. Also included are notes on dialectical differences between Atwamdzini, Hammawi, Adzumawi. Tales, myths, and song texts, with interlinear and free translations. Materials located primarily in the "Achumawi" section of the finding aid. See also the "Atsugewi" section.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Achumawi
Language(s): English | Achumawi
Date: Undated
Type:Text
Extent: 2 folders, 1 box
Description: Three items relating to the Achumawi language have been identified in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. They are all in Subcollection II. They consist of a folder of Achumawi & Atsugewi material and a folder containing a comparative vocabulary of California tribes (with words from from Hupa, Wiyot, Karuk, Shasta, Achumawi, Atsugewi, Konkow, Yana, Wintu, Maidu, and Modoc) in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries V. Hokan; and a box of notes in Series V. Card Files.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)