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Otomi | Chitimacha | Atakapa | Cherokee | Osage | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Nottoway | Kaw | Omaha | Dakota | Pawnee | Nanticoke | A'aninin | Miami | Mi'kmaq | Seminole | Quapaw | Yuchi | Delaware | Ojibwe | Shawnee | Seneca | Mohawk | Onondaga | Cayuga | Oneida | Tuscarora | Natchez | Wyandot | Creek | Mohican | Mohegan
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Ojibwa, Huron-Wyandot, Atsina, Gros Ventre, Micmac, Lenape
Date: 1798-1821
Type:Text
Extent: 219 pages
Description: This volume contains extracts of Benjamin Smith Barton's "New Views of the Origin of the Tribes and Nations of America" (Philadelphia, 1797), with additions by Peter S. Du Ponceau. The bulk of the volume is comprised of word list of 54 words with equivalents listed in a range of 50-70 languages. While Barton listed no authority, Du Ponceau cited sources. Languages with words listed include Chitimacha, Atakapa, Cherokee, Osage, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Nottoway, Kansa, Omaha, Dakota, Pawnee, Nanticoke, Gros Ventres, Miami, Mi'kmaq, Seminole, Quapaw, Yuchi, Delaware, Ojibwe, Shawnee, Seneca, Mohawk, Onondaga, Cayuga, Oneida, Tuscarora, Natches, Wyandot, Creek, Mahican, Mohegan, and many others. The word list includes the terms for God, heaven, and sky, as well as various terms relating to kinship, parts of the body, weather, and more. The volume also includes notes on sounds of the Otomi (Othomi) observations on declension; observations about the Omaha, Kansa, Oto, Arkansas, and Missouri languages; and notes on symbol and sound. Also includes a newspaper clipping of a review (in German) of Barton's "New Views" that appeared in "Göttingische Anzeigen von gelehrten Sachen," June 17, 1799.
Collection: A comparative vocabulary of Indian languages (Mss.497.B28)

Alabama | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Creek | Seminole | Apalachee | Koasati
Alternate forms: Alibamu, Coushatta
Date: 1934-1982
Type:Text
Extent: 0.5 linear feet
Description: Mary Haas worked for a short period to document Alabama with several speakers on in the 1930s. The field notebook is in Series 2 Subseries ‘Multiple Languages' and includes comparisons with Koasati and Choctaw. Around 585 lexical items were obtained from this fieldwork, from which lexical slip files (Series 9) are derived. Haas also utilized John R. Swanton's dictionary of Alabama, and Alabama forms part of extensive Muskogean language comparisons, mostly in Series 2. There is also brief correspondence.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Algonquin | Delaware | Nanticoke | Ojibwe | Cree | Shawnee | Mohican | Unkechaug | Oneida | Cayuga | Onondaga | Miami | Cherokee | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Creek | Tuscarora | Chitimacha | Atakapa
Date: n.d., 1792-1808?; 1802-1808
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 1 volume
Description: 4 pages of words from Jefferson's standard form, with equivalents in Mohiccon and three other languages numbered as 1, 6, 7 (Mohiccon), and 8. A comparative vocabulary of 22 languages, arranged tabularly to follow Jefferson's standard printed vocabulary form. Languages include Delaware, Unami, Monsi, Chippewa, Knisteneaux, Algonquin, Tawa, Shawanee, Nanticoke, Mohiccon, Unkechaug, Oneida, Cayuga, Onondaga, Miami, Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, Tuscarora, Chetimacha, and Atacapa.
Collection: Comparative vocabularies of several Indian languages (Mss.497.J35)

Seminole
Language(s): Mikasuki | English | Muscogee
Date: 1930s-1982
Subject: Linguistics
Extent: 1.0 linear feet
Description: Mary Haas' Mikasuki language materials consist mostly of works by others, drafts and annotated versions of which can be found in Series 2 Subseries 'Mikasuki', along with fairly extensive notes by Haas on Mikasuki tone. In the 1930s Haas documented brief lexica with George Tiger and Ida Mary Bearhead, found in a field notebook containing many other languages in Series 2 Subseries 'Multiple languages'. In 1951, Mary Haas worked with William Sturtevant and speakers including Joseph Jumper to document Mikasuki, the originals of which are held at the Berkeley Language Center (Series 10). Further audio recordings of either Mikasuki or Muscogee were made at the Seminole Bilingual Project in 1973-1974 (a separate entry exists for this fieldwork, as well as for the much more extensive Muscogee materials, with which Mikasuki is often identified). There are also sizable lexical slip files from work by John David West and William Sturtevant in Series 9.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Muscogee
Alternate forms: Creek, Mvskoke, Muskogee
Language(s): Muscogee | English
Date: 1934
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 2 pages
Description: The Muscogee (Creek) materials in the ACLS collection are found in the "Koasati" section of the finding aid among "Alibamu-Koasati and Creek vocabulary and texts," includes a Creek vocabulary given by speaker Nannie Scott.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Muscogee | Seminole | Yuchi
Alternate forms: Creek, Mvskoke, Muskogee
Language(s): English | Muscogee | Yuchi
Date: 1904-1947
Extent: 14 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Creek history, language, and culture. Includes Speck's own notes and work, including "Notes on Social and Economic Conditions Among the Creek Indians of Alabama in 1941" (published as Speck 1947); an undated earlier version of that essay titled "Creek Indians Surviving in Alabama"; 115 pages of linguistic notes from Taskigitown, dated 1904-1905 and organized by categories; Creek and Yuchi songs; Creek and Yuchi Dance; 98 pages of Creek texts, including some interlineal translations, and related notes dated 1904-1905; and 35 pages of miscellaneous notes and letters on topics like dances, language, clothing, myths, handicrafts, and fieldwork. Also includes two botanical specimens--Coopti (Zamia floridana) used by Seminoles, 1941 and Ilex vomitoria Ait, used by Creeks--accompanied by letters to Speck from Richard Evans Schultes concerning Houma Botany; two letters from female students at the Haskell Institute in 1940 (Leona Giger writes of a Creek doll she is making and mentions the council house at Okmulgee, Oklahoma, while Ann Rolland offers to answer questions on Creek use of feathers); a letter from Morris Opler regarding Opler's work among the Creeks, as well as an essay by Opler about the organization, history, and social and political significance of Creek towns; a letter from Mario Gamio acknowledging the receipt of a Creek Indian pamphlet; and a letter from D'Arcy McNickle returning to Speck photographs of the Creek Indians of Atmore, Alabama to prevent them from getting lost and mentioning that his manuscript of the report is still being copied.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Muscogee
Alternate forms: Creek, Mvskoke, Muskogee
Language(s): Muscogee
Date: 1935
Genre: Songs
Extent: 2 min.
Description: The Muscogee (Creek) materials in the Frank Speck recording collection consist of 2 recordings, "Stomp Dance" and "Two Hymns," sung by Matty Alexander.
Collection: Recordings of Cherokee, Creek, Naskapi, Penobscot, Sioux, Santee, Tutelo, and Winnebago (Mss.Rec.49)

Muscogee
Alternate forms: Creek, Mvskoke, Muskogee
Language(s): English | Muscogee
Date: 1930s-1970s
Extent: 7 linear feet
Description: The Muscogee (Creek) materials in the Mary R. Haas Papers are extensive, with materials found in most sections of the collection. In Series I, see especially the correspondence with professional colleagues such as Franz Boas, Jack Martin, William Sturtevant, and others regarding the Muscogee language, as well as correspondence with her Muscogee-speaking consultants, such as James Hill and Watt Sam. Other relevant letters in Series 1 include a "Creek language" subject heading listed with the item. The most extensive amount of material can be found in the "Creek" section of Series 2. This section contains 10 boxes of material. Prominent materials in this section include Haas's original 22 field notebooks, containing vocabulary elicitation, stories, and accompanying notes, recorded in 1941 in Eufaula, Oklahoma, Nonnie Scott, Arthur E. Raiford, James Hill, Jim Marshall, Jim Bullet, Don Starr, Peter Ewing, John Toney, Tom Tiger, Wesley Tauyan, Ollie Tauyan, John Thompson, Tom Red, Johnson Late, and Dan Cooke, plus others only identified with initials; 6 notebooks by James Hill, writing in the Mvskoke writing system, containing stories; Victor Riste's 4 field notebooks from 1931, containing stories and elicited vocabulary with multiple consultants listed; various linguistic notes and other materials derived from the above-listed notebooks; pedagogical materials for Muscogee language learning; a range materials on Muscogee (Creek) history; and more. Series 3 contains a small number of items labelled "Creek." In Series 9, there is additional extensive files linguistic material in the form of lexicons and grammatical notes, as well as ethnographic notes. Some Creek terms are also included in files comparing it with other languages. Lastly, in Series 10, there is a brief "Creek Texts" audio recording from the 1970s, as well as "Creek Text and Conversation" with Watt Sam and Nancy Raven in 1931.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Muscogee
Alternate forms: Creek, Mvskoke, Muskogee
Language(s): English | Muscogee
Date: 1971, 1981, 1996, 1998-2001
Type:Text
Extent: 1116 pages
Description: The Muscogee (Creek) materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 8 items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Drechsel, Ethridge, Fife, Hahn, Hough, Martin, Nichols, Rachlin, and Ramsey.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Muscogee
Alternate forms: Creek, Mvskoke, Muskogee
Language(s): Muscogee | English
Date: 1962
Type:Text
Extent: 2 folders
Description: William Bright's Muscogee language materials consist of class handouts prepared in 1962 on morphology, and a 3-page list of place names found in publications by John Swanton and elsewhere, both in Series 4.
Collection: William O. Bright Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.142)