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Otomi | Chitimacha | Atakapa | Cherokee | Osage | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Nottoway | Kaw | Omaha | Dakota | Pawnee | Nanticoke | A'aninin | Miami | Mi'kmaq | Seminole | Quapaw | Yuchi | Delaware | Ojibwe | Shawnee | Seneca | Mohawk | Onondaga | Cayuga | Oneida | Tuscarora | Natchez | Wyandot | Creek | Mohican | Mohegan
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Ojibwa, Huron-Wyandot, Atsina, Gros Ventre, Micmac, Lenape
Date: 1798-1821
Type:Text
Extent: 219 pages
Description: This volume contains extracts of Benjamin Smith Barton's "New Views of the Origin of the Tribes and Nations of America" (Philadelphia, 1797), with additions by Peter S. Du Ponceau. The bulk of the volume is comprised of word list of 54 words with equivalents listed in a range of 50-70 languages. While Barton listed no authority, Du Ponceau cited sources. Languages with words listed include Chitimacha, Atakapa, Cherokee, Osage, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Nottoway, Kansa, Omaha, Dakota, Pawnee, Nanticoke, Gros Ventres, Miami, Mi'kmaq, Seminole, Quapaw, Yuchi, Delaware, Ojibwe, Shawnee, Seneca, Mohawk, Onondaga, Cayuga, Oneida, Tuscarora, Natches, Wyandot, Creek, Mahican, Mohegan, and many others. The word list includes the terms for God, heaven, and sky, as well as various terms relating to kinship, parts of the body, weather, and more. The volume also includes notes on sounds of the Otomi (Othomi) observations on declension; observations about the Omaha, Kansa, Oto, Arkansas, and Missouri languages; and notes on symbol and sound. Also includes a newspaper clipping of a review (in German) of Barton's "New Views" that appeared in "Göttingische Anzeigen von gelehrten Sachen," June 17, 1799.
Collection: A comparative vocabulary of Indian languages (Mss.497.B28)

Cherokee | Cheyenne | Ojibwe | Choctaw | Dakota | Osage | Pawnee | Ponca | Potawatomi | Meskwaki | Seminole | Ute
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Ojibway, Sioux, Fox
Language(s): English
Date: 1852-1869
Extent: 0.5 linear feet, 96 photographs
Description: Artist Antonio Zeno Shindler worked at the Smithsonian Institution from after the Civil War until the turn of the 20th century, specializing in ethnographic subjects. He was responsible for printing or taking a large number of photographs of American Indians exhibited there in 1869. The 95 studio portraits in the Shindler Collection were part of a suite of 301 images that comprised the first photographic exhibition at the Smithsonian, and that are documented in the catalogue Photographic Portraits of North American Indians in the Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution (1867). The individuals depicted were members of delegations sent to Washington during the years 1852, 1857-1858, and 1867-1869 from the following nations: Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chippewa (Ojibwe), Choctaw, Dakota Sioux (Brule, Miniconjou, Sans Arc, Santee, Sisseton, Two-Kettle, Yankton), Osage, Pawnee, Ponca, Potawatomi, Sac and Fox, Seminole, and Ute. Shindler printed the earlier photographs (mostly taken by the McClees Gallery) and was photographer for the later delegations. See the finding aid for more information. All of the photographs in this collection have been digitized and are in the APS Digital Library.
Collection: A. Zeno Shindler American Indian Photograph Collection (Mss.970.1.Sh6)

Osage | Quapaw | Kaw | Oto | Omaha | Comanche | Creek
Language(s): English
Date: 1834; 1837
Type:Text
Extent: 2 items
Description: Letters from Zina Pitcher and John Collins Warren discussing grave robbing of Indigenous ancestors' remains. Pitcher mentions difficulties in getting information about the deceased from Algonquians, who won't speak of the dead. Mentions Osages, Quapaws, Missouri, Kansas, Otos, Omahas; Chitimachas or Comanches; and the five tribes of the Creek nation. Warren lists American skulls in his collection: mostly eastern, except for Ancient Niagara and Chinook, not flattened, plus Ohio cavern and Ohio rock and Mound at Lexington; Algonquian from eastern Massachusetts. He talks of the Guanche cast from the Canaries and some unidentified skulls he has seen.
Collection: Samuel George Morton Papers (Mss.B.M843)

Caddo | Delaware | Choctaw | Chickasaw | Osage | Pascagoula | Natchez
Language(s): English
Date: 1804
Type:Text
Extent: 107 pages
Description: "Journal up the Red and Washita rivers, with William Dunbar, by order of the U.S. with list of common names of some of the trees and vegetables from the River Washita." No. 2 of Explorations in the Louisiana Country. Describes mounds near Natchez and on the Ouachita. Mentions Caddo trace; Captain Jacobs, a Delaware Indian; Chickasaws, Choctaws, Osages (Little Osages and Grand Osages) and Pascagoulas; warfare and raids; and the singing of a Choctaw woman mourning a child. Printed (abstract only) as Jefferson (1806). [See also Hunter journals #473, volumes 2, 3, 4, May 27, 1804-March 29, 1805.]
Collection: Mémoire sur le district du Ouachita dans la province de la Louisianne, [1803] (Mss.917.6.Ex7)

Natchez | Choctaw | Chickasaw | Yuchi | Delaware | Cherokee | Creek | Osage
Language(s): English | French
Date: 1792-1897
Extent: 28 items
Description: Items relating to materials about the Native peoples of Eastern North America. Topics include papers and articles, particularly those considered for publication (on the relation of pentagonal dodecahedron found near Marietta, Ohio, to shamanism; memoir on aboriginal monuments; memoir of Dr. Charles D. Meigs on bones and burial customs; multiple items regarding a letter from S. P. Hullihen to Dr. Richard Harlan regarding inscription on a stone found at Grave Creek near Wheeling, and Thomas Townsend's claim to prior publication rights to Grave Creek inscription; Caleb Forshey's paper describing a great mound in Adams County, Mississippi; Cushing's publication on exploration of ancient key dwellers' remains on the Gulf Coast of Florida; a response to Henry Phillips' article on supposed runic inscriptions at Yarmouth, Nova Scotia); requests for information or materials (Samuel Miller's request for copies of designated Indian vocabularies of Delaware, Cherokee, Creek, Chickasaw, Choctaw, and Osage, for training missionaries of United Foreign Missionary Society); donations to APS ("curiosities" taken from Indian grave near Cincinnati; relics and fossil shells found in Huntingdon County, West Virginia;"western productions"); Peter S. du Ponceau's work on Southern Indian languages and customs (including Creek, Natchez, Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Yuchi), Indian vocabularies, and for APS; information from Judge William C. Frazer (Wisconsin Territory, Superior County), concerning discovery of burned bricks in Aztalan Mound, Jefferson County, Wisconsin; Cutler's estimation of age of Ohio mounds referred to in Barton (1787) using tree-ring dating; sketch of the plan of an ancient work three miles southeast of Lexington (Kentucky); American Antiquarian Society's plans to publish a volume on mounds based on Caleb Atwater's data; and comparative vocabularies of British Columbia tribes. Other individuals mentioned include Murray, Duralde, Colonel Smith, Benjamin Hawkins, Robley Dunglison, Isaac Lea, Benjamin W. Richards, George M. Wharton, Nathaniel Ware, General Wayne, Dr. Tolmie, George M. Dawson, and Abelard Tomlinson.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Anishinaabe | Chickasaw | Dakota | Delaware | Ojibwe | Osage | Pawnee
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Chippewa, Lenape
Language(s): English
Date: 1804-1805
Type:Text
Genre: Journals
Extent: 1 volume
Description: This collection contains three manuscript journals of exploration expedition, bound together in one volume: one journal by Zebulon Pike, two journals by William Dunbar. The Pike journal documents the expedition to explore the geography of the Mississippi River led by Lt. Zebulon Montgomery Pike in 1805-1806, and his attempts to purchase sites from the Dakota Indians for future military posts, and to bring influential chiefs back to St. Louis for talks. Dunbar's journald document the expedition up the Red and Ouachita Rivers to the Hot Springs of Arkansas in 1804-1805. The "Journal... to the Mouth of the Red River" (200p.) is the fullest available record of the activities of the expedition from the time of their departure from St. Catharine's Landing on October 16, 1804, until their return to Natchez, Miss., on January 26, 1805. The "Journal of a geometrical survey" includes a record of course and distances as well as a thermometrical log and other brief notes. The second of these mention Osage and Caddo, their relations with whites (enemies and friends), trade to Osages with Delaware Indian as aid, and Chickasaw.
Collection: Expedition Journals (Mss.917.7.D91)

Caddo | Cherokee | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Delaware | Osage
Language(s): English
Date: 1796-1809
Type:Text
Extent: 4 volumes
Description: I. Journal kept by George Hunter of a tour from Philadelphia to Kentucky and the Illinois country. July 14 - October 18, 1796 (38 pages). Journal from Philadelphia towards Lexington, Kentucky, by George Hunter, Senior and Junior, August 19 - September 8, 1802 (28 pages). Miscellaneous accounts (2 pages). II. Continuation of journal of trip to Lexington, September 13 - 0ctober 26, 1802 (33 pages). Journey to explore Louisiana, May 27, 1804 - January 28, 1805 (36 pages). III. Journal of an excursion from Natchez on the Mississippi, October 16 - December 31, 1804 (40 pages). Thermometrical observations, October 18 - December 6, 1804 (27 pages). IV. Continuation of journal of excursion from Natchez, January 1 - March 27, 1805 (17 pages). Volume I mentions Indians resorting at the Wabash, gives account of Indian woman who lost nose for infidelity; mentions theft of horses and Indians hired to recover them (Delaware); Indian Gillaway among these. Volumes II, III, and IV, in part based on letters to Hunter's wife, probably copied from these. Volume III mentions Captain Jacobs; Delaware Indians; Chickasaw and Choctaw. Volume IV mentions murder of some Cherokees by Little Osages; plundering of white men by Grand Osages who had visited Washington; Choctaw woman mourning child; memo noting omission of description of Indian mounds, present in copy #472.
Collection: George Hunter Journals (Mss.B.H912)

Arapaho | Caddo | Cherokee | Cheyenne | Comanche | Delaware | Kiowa | Meskwaki | Osage | Oto | Ottawa | Pawnee | Ponca | Quapaw | Seneca-Cayuga | Shawnee | Yuchi
Alternate forms: Arapahoe
Language(s): English
Date: 1973-1974
Genre: Songs | Speeches
Extent: 36 audiocassettes (33 hr., 53 min.)
Description: Recordings of powwows, benefit dances, wedding dances, dance competitions, and other permonances at various grounds in Oklahoma and Missouri from 1973-1974 by Sue Roark-Calnek. Includes round dances, stomp dances, war dances, gourd dances, snake dances, buffalo dances, hand games, and others. Dancers, singers, and staff are Arapaho, Caddo, Cayuga, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Delaware, Fox, Hopi, Kiowa, Osage, Ottawa, Oto, Pawnee, Ponca, Quapaw, Seneca, Shawnee, and Yuchi. Includes Delaware and Quapaw Pow-Wow, Osage Inloska Society, Arapaho Starhawk Society, Nevada (Mo.) Bushwhacker Days Pow-Wow, and White Oak Shawnee Night Stomp Dance, Kihekah Steh Pow-Wow, and Seneca-Cayuga Green Corn Ceremonial and Stomp Dance. Some materials may be restricted due to cultural sensitivity and privacy concerns.
Collection: Indian performances in Oklahoma (Mss.Rec.107)

Abenaki | Cherokee | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Creek | Dakota | Ottawa | Ojibwe | Miami | Osage | Pawnee | Penobscot | Stockbridge-Munsee
Alternate forms: Abnaki, Sioux, Ottawa, Ojibwa, Ojibway, Chippewa, Stockbridge, Wabanaki
Language(s): English
Date: 1817-1883
Type:Text
Extent: 64 reels
Description: These papers include letters, reports, accounts, and memoranda relating to the work of the American Board of Home Missions among the Abenaki, Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, Dakota, Ojibwa, Miami, Osage, Pawnee, Penobscot, and Stockbridge-Munsee peoples of Arkansas, New York, and Oregon. Originals in Houghton Library, Harvard University.
Collection: Papers,1817-1883, relating to North American Indian missions (Mss.Film.1223)

Osage
Language(s): English | Osage
Date: 1951
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 226 pages, cards (undetermined quantity)
Description: The Osage materials in the ACLS collection consist of materials in multiple sections of the finding aid. The "Osage" section of the finding aid includes Wolff's linguistic field notes. In the "Chiwere" section, Marsh's lexical file contains some comparisons to Osage cognates. In the "Dakota" section, there is Deloria's "Study of Osage consonant shifts."
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)