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Maya | Mixtec
Language(s): French
Date: 1859-1882
Extent: 2.0 linear feet, 123 photographs
Description: A traveler, archaeologist, and photographer, Désiré Charnay (1828-1915) was one of the most important early expeditionary photographers. During his tours of Yucatan, Oaxaca, and Chiapas in 1858-1860 and 1880-1886, Charnay became one of the first to use photography in documenting the great Meso-American archaeological sites and to make ethnographic photographs of indigenous Mexicans. This collection of photographs is representative of the range of images he took of Meso-American archaeological sites during three tours of Mexico in 1858-1860 and 1880-1886. Although some of the images have suffered an unfortunate degree of fading, they convey the power and fascination that these sites held for Charnay and his contemporaries, and include some of the best early examples of the use of photography in the documentation of Mexican archaeology. The collection includes images of the sites at Tula, Teotihuacan, Iztaccihuatl, Chichen Itza, Comalcalco, and Palenque; of archaeological specimens held at the Museum of Mexico; of landscape and villages in Yucatan, Chiapas, and Oaxaca; and of a series of Lacandon, Mayan, Mixtec, and Yucatec "racial types." The collection was apparently assembled by the scientist Griffith Evans Abbot (1850-1927), who presented them to the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. The 15 cartes de visite included in the collection, mostly portraits taken in Peru, Chile, and Madeira, bear an uncertain relationship to the Charnay images, and are probably present simply because they were also once owned by Abbot. All images have been digitized and are available through the APS Digital Library.
Collection: Abbot-Charnay Photograph Collection (Mss.913.72.Ab23)

Abenaki | Innu | Penobscot | Maliseet | Haudenosaunee | Wabanaki | Atikamekw
Alternate forms: Abnaki, Tete de Boule
Date: 1914-1930
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: The Abenaki materials in the Hallowell Papers are mostly located in Series V, Research Files, in folders labled "Abenaki" and Series VI, Photographs, Subseries E "St. Francis Abenaki Album." These include linguistic, ethnographic, ethnobotanical, ceremonial knowledge, information on political organization, and historical materials. Of particular interest are a sketch of Abenaki history from 1600-1930 accompanied by detailed notes from secondary sources on 17th century Abenaki history. The linguistic materials include an analysis of how the language changed after contact with Catholic missionaries, Abenaki vocabulary related to body parts, Abenaki phonetics, and religious, medical, and kinship terminology. The ethnobotanical materials include a manuscript labled "Identity of animals and plants," and information concerning herbal medicine and its practitioners. There is a wealth of ethnographic materials that include drawings of pipes, descriptions of games, baketry and birch bark maks. There is descriptions of Abenaki music and diagrams of dances, as well as detailed descriptions of hunting techniques. Some of the genealogical materials contains lists of community members names and descriptions of marriage. Interspered throughout the folders labled "Abenaki" in the Research Files are interlinear translations of stories such as "Man who could Find Lost Objects," "Woman and Bear Lover" and numerous other stories. The materials on hunting include topics such as the use of snow shoes, preparation of moose hide,and techniques and drawings of trapping. The collections contain important information designation hunting territories and family names. Four folders contain detailed informaiton on kinship terms. Two folders on Measurements and Genealogical data contain lists of names. The folders labled "Linguistics" in Series V contain scattered information about Abenaki grammar. In Series VI, of 160 photographs taken at St. Francis, Odanak in the Centre-du-Québec region. The Abenaki people in the photographs are identified, in most cases, and also include depictions of traditional dress, buildings, clothing, baskets, and a wide variety of material culture. The correspondence, in Series I, includes letters from Theophile Panadis; Gordon Day describing his collection of stories, recordings, vocabularies, and hunting territories. Henry Lorne Masta, one of Hallowell's Abenaki consultants, writes about culture and language. Additional correspondents may contain other Abenaki-related information.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Abenaki | Haudenosaunee | Wabanaki
Alternate forms: Abnaki
Date: 1884; 1959-1976; 1929
Type:Text
Extent: 1,300 pages; 1 microfilm reel
Description: The Abenaki materials in the Siebert Papers are located primarily in Series III and V. Ther are descriptions of wars with the Iroquois from the 17th century, linguistic materials, and stories. Series V includes 5 research notebooks containing historical notes and some linguistics materials.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Abenaki | Wabanaki
Alternate forms: Abnaki
Date: circa 1756-1760 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 3 items
Description: Part of a collection comprised of religious and linguistic materials in various Native American languages. Many were written by Jesuit missionaries of New France. These three items concern the Abenaki language and include linguistic and religious materials in French and Abenaki, including catechisms, hymns, canticles, parts of speech, etc. Originals in the archives of the Séminaire de Québec at the Université Laval [formerly the Séminaire de Québec] and the Archives de l'Archeveche de Quebec.
Collection: Selected materials, 1676-1930, on Indian linguistics (Mss.Film.453)

Algonquian | Mohawk | Wiyot | Yurok | Lenape | Cree | Ojibwe | Onondaga | Crow | Omaha | Zuni | Yucatec | Quechua | Pawnee
Language(s): English | French | Algonquian
Date: 1948-1977
Type:Text
Description: The Algonquin materials in the Lounsbury Papers include information about indigenous place names, Delaware kinship terminology in Series II. Series III includes work on comparative linguistics, phonology, dialects. The correspondence in Series I contains letters on kinship systems from a diverse array of tribes.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Algonquin | Naskapi | Cree | Nipissing | Ojibwe | Rama | Chibcha | Maya | Haudenosaunee | Ktunaxa
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Iroquois, Kutenai
Language(s): English | French
Date: 1912-1941 and undated
Extent: 7 items
Description: Materials relating to both Algonquin and related Algonquian peoples, cultures, and languages. Includes Speck's notes on artifacts found near Lake Abitibi and in the Nipissing district; his Seven Islands field notes, including texts with interlinear translations, house data, names of animals, and a letter in French from Marie Louise Ambroise; abstracts of Speck's published works on the Rama-Chibcha of Nicaragua, River Desert Algonquins, Southern Ontario Indians, Maya, and others; sketches and comments on shoulder blade divination (scapulimancy), including notes on deer drives (including an undated note from A. Irving Hallowell) and the distribution of artifacts among Algonquin, Naskapi, and Mistassini peoples; two field notebooks containing (1) linguistic notes and informant and population data for Waswanipi, Abitibi, Temiskaming [Timiskaming], Nipissing, Algonquian and (2) Temiskaming ethnography, Wisiledjak (Wiskyjack) [Wisakedjak, a manitou] text (in English), Temagami ethnology and texts (in English), and one Iroquois legend; general information on birch-bark containers, including 37 photographs and 40 pages of notes relating to Algonquin, Cree, Ojibwe and Ktunaxa specimens, and a letter from Bella Weitzner; and a letter from A. G. Bailey sending Speck a copy of his book on Algonquians.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Algonquin | Anishinaabe
Language(s): French | Algonquin | Latin
Date: 1661-1819 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 10 items
Description: These manuscripts include dictionaries, grammars, catechisms, prayers, canticles, hymns, and Bible tales prepared by French Sulpician missionaries in New France in Algonquin, the Nipissing dialect of Algonquin, and some Iroquoian languages. From originals at the Seminaire de Montreal, les Pretres de Saint-Sulpice.
Collection: Indian manuscripts, 1661-1879 (Mss.Film.1109)

Algonquin | Innu | Inuit | Abenaki
Alternate forms: Eskimo, Montagnais
Language(s): French | Algonquin | Latin
Date: 1637-1847
Type:Text
Extent: 8 items
Description: Part of a collection comprised of religious and linguistic materials in various Native American languages. Many were written by Jesuit missionaries of New France, although Cuoq was Sulpician. These eight items primarly concern the Algonquin language and include linguistic and religious materials in French, Latin, and Algonquin such as prayers, hymns, canticles, music, catechisms, etc. A few items incorporate some Abenaki, Inuit, and Innu language material as well. There is also the 125-page Registre de Sillery 1637 a 1690 containing Native baptismal and confirmation records. Originals in the archives of the Séminaire de Québec at the Université Laval [formerly the Séminaire de Québec] and the Archives de l'Archeveche de Quebec.
Collection: Selected materials, 1676-1930, on Indian linguistics (Mss.Film.453)

Atakapa
Alternate forms: Atacapa, Ishak
Language(s): Atakapa | French
Date: 1802
Contributor: Duralde, Martin
Type:Text
Extent: 8 pages
Description: The Atakapa materials in this collection consist of manuscripts listed in the finding aid as Item 10: Martin Duralde's "Suite du vocabulaire de la langue des Atacapas."
Collection: American Philosophical Society Historical and Literary Committee, American Indian Vocabulary Collection    (Mss.497.V85)

Blackfoot
Alternate forms: Siksika
Language(s): Blackfoot | French
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 520 pages on microfilm
Description: Blackfoot materials in Collection of Canadian Indian linguistic materialsinclude Dictionnaire francais Pied-Noir, positive film; negative in possession of Catholic University of America; original in possession of Archives Provinciales, Edmonton, Alberta. Alphabetical by French.
Collection: Collection of Canadian Indian linguistic materials (Mss.Film.1008)