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Maya | Mixtec
Language(s): French
Date: 1859-1882
Extent: 2.0 linear feet, 123 photographs
Description: A traveler, archaeologist, and photographer, Désiré Charnay (1828-1915) was one of the most important early expeditionary photographers. During his tours of Yucatan, Oaxaca, and Chiapas in 1858-1860 and 1880-1886, Charnay became one of the first to use photography in documenting the great Meso-American archaeological sites and to make ethnographic photographs of indigenous Mexicans. This collection of photographs is representative of the range of images he took of Meso-American archaeological sites during three tours of Mexico in 1858-1860 and 1880-1886. Although some of the images have suffered an unfortunate degree of fading, they convey the power and fascination that these sites held for Charnay and his contemporaries, and include some of the best early examples of the use of photography in the documentation of Mexican archaeology. The collection includes images of the sites at Tula, Teotihuacan, Iztaccihuatl, Chichen Itza, Comalcalco, and Palenque; of archaeological specimens held at the Museum of Mexico; of landscape and villages in Yucatan, Chiapas, and Oaxaca; and of a series of Lacandon, Mayan, Mixtec, and Yucatec "racial types." The collection was apparently assembled by the scientist Griffith Evans Abbot (1850-1927), who presented them to the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. The 15 cartes de visite included in the collection, mostly portraits taken in Peru, Chile, and Madeira, bear an uncertain relationship to the Charnay images, and are probably present simply because they were also once owned by Abbot. All images have been digitized and are available through the APS Digital Library.
Collection: Abbot-Charnay Photograph Collection (Mss.913.72.Ab23)

Akimel O'odham
Alternate forms: Pima
Language(s): Tohono O'odham | English
Date: 1991
Contributor: Shaul, David
Type:Text
Extent: 1 folder
Description: Jane Rosenthal's only O'odham item is a draft of David Shaul's paper “A Piman Voice” on agriculture, religion and language in colonial New Spain (Series 2 Subseries 3).
Collection: Jane M. Rosenthal Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.129)

Mixtec
Language(s): English | Mixtec
Date: 1940
Contributor: Wilbur, Walter K.
Extent: 220 pages
Description: This typescript with hand-colored plates is an analysis of the material culture of one of the eight extant Mixtec codices, Codex Vindobonensis I. This codex is known by several names, including Codex Constantinopolitanus, Codex Byzantinus, and Codex Mexicanus I. The last name is more often used in the present day. The original is housed at the Austrian National Library at Vienna. Includes over three hundred vividly colored pictographs and phonetic signs of the Mixtec language. Repainted by the author, the watercolors exhibit pottery, ornaments, weapons, and ceremonial paraphernalia. Some of these images have been digitized and are available through the APS Digital Library.
Collection: Ancient Mexican material culture as revealed in Codex Vindobonensis Mexicanus, 1940 (Mss.913.72.Wi649)

Aztec
Alternate forms: Nahua
Language(s): German
Date: circa 1933
Type:Text
Genre: Essays
Extent: 17 pages
Description: The Aztec materials in the ACLS collection consist of one item found in the "Aztec" section of the finding aid. This item is a German language manuscript, "Das Leben im alten Mexico," by Gertrud Lange, which discusses Aztec culture before the Conquest, political organization, society, religion and thought. For related modern materials, see the "Nahuatl" section of the finding aid.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Aztec
Language(s): English | Spanish
Date: 1925
Genre: Booklets
Extent: 1 folder
Description: The Eugenics Record Office Records consist of 330.5 linear feet of materials relating to the ERO, founded in 1910 for the study of human heredity and as a repository for genetic data on human traits. The Eugenics Record Office Papers (1670-1964) contain trait schedules, newspaper clippings, manuscript essays, pedigree charts, article abstracts, reprints, magazine articles, bibliographies, photographs, hair samples, postcard pictures, card files, and some correspondence which document the projects of the Eugenics Record Office during the thirty-four years of its operation. Aztec materials include Folder "A:9772. Mexico" (1925), located in Series I. Trait Files, Box #65, which contains "Mexican Folkways," a booklet of brief essays such as "The Magic of Love Among the Aztecs" and "Coatlicue, An Aztec Goddess." Edited by Frances Toor with short offerings from Mario Gamio and several others. It was intended for the education of North American students of Spanish, and each essay appears in both English and Spanish on the advice of Franz Boas and others.
Collection: Eugenics Record Office Records (Mss.Ms.Coll.77)

Aztec
Language(s): English
Date: May 9, 1866
Type:Text
Extent: 3 pages
Description: Letter to J. P. McCaskey expressing thanks for being made a member of the Linnean Society and hope that Mexican hieroglyphics will be deciphered.
Collection: Jacob Stauffer Papers, 1844-1879 (Mss.B.St15)

Aztec
Language(s): Spanish
Date: 1785-1806?
Contributor: Unknown
Extent: 18 pages
Description: One of various items related to the Dupaix expeditions of 1806 (totaling four loose notebooks with 23 ink and pencil sketches of Mexican ruins and hieroglyphics featuring fragmented text, in Spanish, with images of construction and decoration on stonework, pottery and buildings of various native ruins of the Yucatan). This item, "Varios modas de pintar. Y por geroglificos en el fresco y al temple," is a brief discussion of coloring techniques with some mention of figures used.
Collection: Notes on Mexican Antiquities (Mss.913.72.N84)

Nahua | Zapotec | Zoque
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1925-1967
Type:Text
Extent: 7 folders
Description: There are many items relating to Mexican languages in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. This entry is intended as a catch-all for materials that cover Mexican (and to some extent, Central American) languages in general. Researchers should also view the entries for specific languages (i.e., Nahuatl, Zoque, etc.) and for South America, under which Voegelin often filed Mexican and Central American materials. In Subcollection I, there is relevant correspondence with Glen Turner and William L. Wonderly in Series I. Correspondence; William L. Wonderly's "List of Central American Indian Languages" and Larry Lyman's "The Verb Syntagmemes of Choapan Zapotec" in Series IV. Works by Others"; and a folder on South American and Other Latin American Languages (which includes Central America and Mexico) in file in Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-A: Language Notes. In Subcollection II, there is relevant correspondence with Kenneth Croft (regarding American Indian language work in Mexico and Croft's progress with Nahuatl) and Morris Swadesh (his collection of Uto-Aztecan language materials, including many from Mexico) in Series I. Correspondence.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Wichí | Tohono O'odham | Tepecano | Nahua | Huastec | Karankawa | Otomi | Mazahua | Matlatzinca | Pame | Chichimeca | Cuitlatec | Mazatec | Popoluca | Cuicatec | Amuzgo | Zapotec | Chatino | Chinantec | Purepecha | Tlapanec
Alternate forms: Papago, Tarascan, Tarasco
Language(s): English
Date: 1913-1966;
Extent: 165 pages; Circa 300 items;
Description: The Mexico materials, John Alden Mason Papers include a log of a trip to Sonora, itinerary of pack trip from Yecora to Maicoba; lists of photographs; journal. Archaological materials: report on archaeological sites near Rancho Guiracoba, Sonora, Mexico with report on surface collections at six sites in southern Sonora. Notes on the Northern Extension of the Chalchihuites Culture, written for the Mexican Historical Congress, Zacatecas. Slayton Creek Excavation, regarding Mexico; the Papago [Tohono O'odham]; a dig at Slayton Creek, Delaware. Regarding archaeological, ethnological, and linguistic work in Mexico; genetic classification of languages of Central America and Mexico. Regarding internal strife in local (Durango) Indian tribe (including murders); archaeology in Durango; collection of specimens of material culture; work at Schroeder pyramid; cliff dwellings near Mezquital. Mentions Alex Krieger. Cave investigations in Durango and Coahuila, report on search conducted with Robert H. Merrill for traces of early man, particularly on the Folsom horizon. Written for Weitlaner volume. Includes description of three varieties of Cucurbita moschata; evidence in conflict with the theory that Cucurbita moschata was introduced into southern Arizona in late prehistoric or early historic times from the north and east. Regarding Maya pottery; Piedras Negras, Guatemala; archaeological work in Mexico and Guatemala; the University Museum (University of Pennsylvania); Vaillant's obituary. Includes correspondence between Mason and Sue Vaillant (Mrs. George C.) and between Mason and Charles Marius Barbeau. Linguistic materials: a list entitled, "Familias linguisticas de Mexico-idiomas y dialectos a ellas pertencientes," with the families with subdivisions: for Museo nacional de arqueologia, historia y etnologia, Anales. Includes lexical items in the various languages--Hokan, Oto-Manguren, Uto-Aztecan, and Maya-- arranged in columns; Spanish glosses. Regarding Mason's Subtiaba-Hokan-Caduveo-Mataco comparative vocabulary. Kroeber is not much impressed with the possible resemblances in Mason's list (included). Mexican linguistics, comparative vocabularies, etc., includes short comparative vocabularies for Comecrudo, Papago-Tepecano, Nahua, Huaxtec, Choctaw, Coahuiltec, Karankawa, Torkana, Atakapa, Chitimacha, Tunica; notes on Sapir's classification; other miscellaneous notes. Comparative vocabulary, includes letter from Frederick Johnson to John Alden Mason; comparative vocabulary which is number-keyed to a list of twenty-two languages and arranged in columns headed by Spanish glosses. Words lacking in some languages for almost all items. Languages include Otomi, Mazahua, Matlatzinca, Ocuiltec, Pame, Chichimeca, Cuitlateco, Mazatec, Popoluca, Chochotec (Tlapanec), Ichcateco, Trique, Chiapanec, Manque, Mixtec, Cuicatec, Amuzgo, Zapotec, Chatino, Chinantec, Tarasco, and Tlapanec. Scholarly materials: two versions of a paper, entitled, "Los Cuatro Grandes Filones Linguisticos de Mexico y Centroamerica," for the International Congress of Americanists, August 1939, Mexico. Photographs: Unidentified photographs showing people, dwellings, terrain, etc. Images of temples, excavations, crypts, jade work, etc. Includes a photograph of John Alden Mason and Burton W. Bascom from Palenque. Entire series of photographs from the Mason papers. The bulk of the images are from Mexico (Chihuahua, Durango, Sonora, etc.). Also 3 contact sheets of images from Peru. From the Durango expedition, a list of photographs; "Informes hacera de la Sierro de la Candela:" notes from Tarayre, pages 184-185; "Ruins of an agricultural colony near Zape"; possible routes of migration into Mexico; Everardo Gamiz "La Raza Pigmea," Durango, April 1934; an incomplete set of numbered photos enumerated in above list (all duplicates from museum set). A linguistic realignment north of Mexico, which gives six phyla, one "broken phylum," and two uncertain languages (for presentation at the meeting of the American Anthropological Association, Chicago, 1940) and a detailed outline of five phyla plus several unaffiliated languages.
Collection: John Alden Mason Papers (Mss.B.M384)

Maya | Mixtec
Language(s): Spanish
Date: 1785; circa 1800
Contributor: Unknown
Extent: 2 items
Description: Two of the various items related to the Dupaix expeditions of 1806 (totaling four loose notebooks with 23 ink and pencil sketches of Mexican ruins and hieroglyphics featuring fragmented text, in Spanish, with images of construction and decoration on stonework, pottery and buildings of various native ruins of the Yucatan). "Notas varias y Caprichosas; Tehuantepec, Tonila, etc." discusses means of construction and decoration of stone work in various Mexican and Mayan sites (One sheet bears reference to 2nd Mixtecan expedition, 1806, i.e., DuPaix's 1806 expedition). "Pyramide de Paplanta [sic]. Description Ic[o]nografica, de la antigua y famosa Piramide o Adoratorio del Pueblo de Papantla" consists of two items relating to the pyramid at Papantla.
Collection: Notes on Mexican Antiquities (Mss.913.72.N84)