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Shawnee | Delaware | Potawatomi | Meskwaki | Menominee | Cree | Ojibwe | Blackfoot | Cheyenne | Ktunaxa | Penobscot | Mi'kmaq
Alternate forms: Lenape, Fox, Ojibwa, Ojibway, Micmac
Date: circa 1930s-1960s
Extent: 25 folders, 1 box
Description: There are many materials relating to Algonquian languages in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. This entry is intended as a catch-all for materials labeled as Algonquian or Macro-Algonquian, or having to do with several Algonquian languages in a general way. Researchers should also view the entries for specific Algonquian languages and culture groups. Algonquian materials are located in both Subcollection I and Subcollection II. In Subcollection I, there is relevant correspondence with Leonard Bloomfield (regarding an inscription on a silver bracelet; Bloomfield's "Menomini Grammar"), Charles Hockett (with questions about Voegelin's article on Delaware and examples from other Algonquian languages), and Morris Swadesh (including a brief Stockbridge vocabulary and a slip of Moravian Delaware) in Series I. Correspondence; 1 box of comparative Algonquian vocabulary and grammar in Series II. and several linguistic maps (i.e., "Algonquian language text with illustrations" and "Linguistic classification of the Southern New England Algonquians"), particularly of the Potawatomi, Delaware, and Shawnee, to accompany the texts of Voegelin's work on Algonquian languages, in Series VII. Photographs. In Subcollection II, there is relevant correspondence from Eric Hamp (to Ives Goddard regarding preparation of Arapaho and Algonquian works) and Frank Speck (to Edward Sapir regarding his work on Mi'kmaq and other northern Algonquian languages and societies) in Series I. Correspondence. There is also an entire subseries devoted to Macro-Algonquian: Subseries III. Macro-Algonquian of Series II. Research Notes. This subseries contains a grammatical sketch of Algonquian by Leonard Bloomfield (135 pages of typescript with handwritten edits and 7 interleaved pages of notes by Voegelin); another "Sketch of Algonquian" by Bloomfield consisting of a notebook (approx. 45 pages) and handwritten notes (approx. 80 pages); 5 folders of notebooks focusing on beginning sounds ("Č and K," "L and M," "N and P," " Š and T," and "Θ and ?"), drawing from Pacific Coast Algonquian ("PCA"), Fox [Meskwaki], Plains Cree, Menominee, and Ojibwe; 3 folders of other comparative Algonquian notebooks organized by general nouns, body parts, kinship terms, numerals, and verbs; miscellaneous Algonquian notes; and specimens of Central Algonquian, including short texts in Fox [Meskwaki], Ojibwe, Menominee, and Plains Cree, with English translations. The rest of the material in the Macro-Algonquian folder is organized according to specific languages: Blackfoot, Cheyenne, Fox (Meskwaki), Kutenai [Ktunaxa culture], Ojibwe, Penobscot, and Shawnee. Finally, there is an article titled "Some Observations on Algonquian Phonology" in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries I: General works; an incomplete typed draft of Bloomfield's "Sketch of Algonquian" in Series IV. Works by Others; and a "Linguistic map of Southern New England" in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries V: American Indian Languages.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Atakapa
Alternate forms: Atacapa, Ishak
Language(s): Atakapa | English
Date: 1934
Type:Text
Extent: 3 pages
Description: The Atakapa materials in the ACLS collection consist of one item found in the "Atakapa" section of the finding aid. This item is a fragmentary list of Atakapa terms with English equivalents, recorded near Lake Charles, Louisiana.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Atakapa
Alternate forms: Atacapa, Ishak
Language(s): Atakapa | English
Date: undated
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 0.25 linear feet
Description: Haas' Atakapa file consists mostly of morpheme analysis and lexical comparisons to languages of the Gulf area under the Gulf macrofamily hypothesis, the majority of which can be found in Series 9 under the headings of language families and proto-languages. Of particular interest is a comparative phonology of Southern US and Mexican languages, likely written by Morris Swadesh, in Series 3.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Aymara | Quechua
Language(s): English | Aymara | Spanish
Date: 1950-1972
Description: The Aymara materials in the Lounsbury Papers consist of comparative linguistics and studies of kinship in Series II. Of particular interest are the audio recordings in Series VII on the folklore of the Ayar Incas. The correspondence, in Series I, contains information of the geographic distribution of the language, Lounsbury's analysis of the language and its relationship to Quechua, Christian scriptures in Aymara, Morris Swadesh's work on genetic classification of Native American languages, and geographic distribution of Aymara population.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Biloxi
Alternate forms: Tanêks, Tanêksa
Language(s): Biloxi | English
Date: 1934
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 3 pages
Description: The Biloxi materials in the ACLS collection consist of 1 item found in the "Biloxi" section of the finding aid. This item is a 3-page English-Biloxi word list collected in 1934 from Emma Jackson, regarded as the last native speaker of the language.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Catawba | Yupik
Language(s): Catawba | English | Yupik, Central
Date: 1935-1939
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: Circa 2,300 slips, and 1 notebook
Description: The Catawba materials in the ACLS collection consist of three items found in the "Catawba" section of the finding aid. There is one notebook by Morris Swadesh containing texts, Vocabularies, grammatical notes, and a Catawba "letter to Speck." Also includes 2 pages of unidentified "Alaskan Eskimo" mixed in (probably Unaaliq). There are two Catawba lexicons: one by Amelia Susman, containing approximatetly 1,000 slips and organized by stems, based upon Frank Speck's "Catawba Texts" (1934); and another by an unidentified compiler (possibly Frank Siebert), also based on Speck and unpublished materials.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Catawba | Houma | Pamunkey | Cheraw | Yuchi | Cherokee | Innu | Naskapi | Dakota | Wataree | Creek | Shawnee | Haudenosaunee | Tutelo | Powhatan
Alternate forms: Montagnais-Naskapi, Sioux, Iroquois
Language(s): English | Catawba
Date: 1914-1947
Type:Text
Extent: 21 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Catawba history, language, and culture. This includes Speck's correspondence with indigenous consultants such as Red Thunder Cloud, Chief Sam Blue, and Leola Blue (Catawba) and Will West Long and Climbing Bear (Cherokee); correspondence with other anthropologists and linguists, such as John Reed Swanton, William N. Fenton, Erminie Wheeler-Voegelin, C.F. Voegelin, Morris Swadesh, A. I. Hallowell, Mary Haas, and others; genealogies of twentieth-century Catawba consultants; a Catawba bibliography; notes on topics including Catawba division of time, travel and expedition, food resources, racial status in the South, and notes, possibly for a lecture, titled "The Catawba-A Small Nation Deflated"; a University of Pennsylvania student's essay on Catawba tribal correspondence with J. Walter Fewkes about Speck's Catawba field trips; field notebooks devoted to ethnologic notes, vocabulary, texts, songs, and other linguistic and cultural data; and collections of notes devoted to Catawba language and texts, general ethnological notes, and miscellaneous notes. Some of the notes and notebooks and much of the correspondence mentions other indigenous groups as well.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Cayuse | Nez Perce | Walowa | Walla Walla
Alternate forms: Liksiyu
Language(s): Cayuse | English | Nez Perce
Date: 1930
Type:Text
Extent: 3 notebooks; circa 800 slips
Description: The Cayuse materials in the ACLS collection consist of 3 notebooks and a lexical file in the "Cayuse" section of the finding aid. The notebooks (section Ps1a.1) contain texts with interlinear translations, as told to Morris Swadesh by Gilbert Minthorne, in the Niimi'ipuutímt language, including one text later published by Jarold Ramsey as "Fish Hawk's Raid Against the Sioux" (in the book "Coming To Light: Contemporary Translations of the Native Literatures of North America", ed. Brian Swann, 1994, Vintage Books, New York). The lexical files contains approximately 800 slips, with Cayuse forms with English equivalents, arranged alphabetically by Cayuse. One section, "Wai'letpu Ethnology," concerns use of Cayuse dialect by Walowa and Walla Walla.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Chehalis | Puyallup
Date: 1882, circa 1890; 1897, 1927-1936
Type:Text
Extent: 1800+ loose pages, 15 notebooks, circa 8000 slips
Description: The Chehalis materials in the ACLS collection consist of a large volume of material spread across numerous items in the "Chehalis" section of the finding aid. Major items of significance include Boas's Upper Chehalis field notebooks, recorded in 1927 near Oakville, Washington, containing vocabulary, paradigms, and texts with interlinear translations. Additional loose notes contains numerous stories, which partially derive from the field notebooks. Also noteworthy is an extensive lexical file of over 8,000 slips derived from Boas's field work, partially arranged and analyzed. Earlier materials relating to the Lower Chehalis dialect were recorded circa 1890 by Boas at Shoalwater Bay, as well as material copied from Myron Eells' 1880s field work and later corrected by Boas. Other smaller items, such as Aginsky's comparison of Upper Chehalis and Puyallup, consist primarily of linguistic analysis and some ethnographic information. The names of Chehalis speakers and consultants who made the work possible are not fully reflected in the cataloging, as many are typically not identified by Boas.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Chemakum | Quileute | Klallam
Alternate forms: Chimakum, S'Klallam, Clallam, nəxʷsƛ̕ay̕əm
Language(s): English | Chemakum | Quileute | Klallam
Date: 1853?; 1890; 1928; 1930; 1953;
Type:Text
Extent: 45 pages; 1 notebook (14 pages); Circa 1,500 slips
Description: The Chemakum materials in the ACLS collection consist of 5 items in the "Chimakum" section of the finding aid. The earliest item is a word list recorded by George Gibbs, circa 1853, from a woman named Jule, slave and mistress of King George, a Clallam chief. This list is in English orthography with accents marked, and includes parts of body, household objects, material objects, animals, adverbs, verbs. Subsequent fieldwork includes a notebook by Manuel Andrade, containing an English-Chimakum vocabulary, with an attempt to verify use of consultant Louise Webster by Franz Boas at Port Gamble in 1890. Additional material includes linguistic analyses by Sapir and Swadesh. Lastly, an extensive lexicon of over 1,500 slips was compiled by Franz Boas, based upon field work conducted in 1890. Boas's original field notebook is found as Notebook 3 in "Field notes on Chinookan and Salishan languages and Gitamat], Molala, and Masset ," located in the "Chinook" section of the finding aid. Some Klallam language information may be intermixed with the Chimakum language information, but not currently distinguished.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)