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Maya | Mixtec
Language(s): French
Date: 1859-1882
Extent: 2.0 linear feet, 123 photographs
Description: A traveler, archaeologist, and photographer, Désiré Charnay (1828-1915) was one of the most important early expeditionary photographers. During his tours of Yucatan, Oaxaca, and Chiapas in 1858-1860 and 1880-1886, Charnay became one of the first to use photography in documenting the great Meso-American archaeological sites and to make ethnographic photographs of indigenous Mexicans. This collection of photographs is representative of the range of images he took of Meso-American archaeological sites during three tours of Mexico in 1858-1860 and 1880-1886. Although some of the images have suffered an unfortunate degree of fading, they convey the power and fascination that these sites held for Charnay and his contemporaries, and include some of the best early examples of the use of photography in the documentation of Mexican archaeology. The collection includes images of the sites at Tula, Teotihuacan, Iztaccihuatl, Chichen Itza, Comalcalco, and Palenque; of archaeological specimens held at the Museum of Mexico; of landscape and villages in Yucatan, Chiapas, and Oaxaca; and of a series of Lacandon, Mayan, Mixtec, and Yucatec "racial types." The collection was apparently assembled by the scientist Griffith Evans Abbot (1850-1927), who presented them to the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. The 15 cartes de visite included in the collection, mostly portraits taken in Peru, Chile, and Madeira, bear an uncertain relationship to the Charnay images, and are probably present simply because they were also once owned by Abbot. All images have been digitized and are available through the APS Digital Library.
Collection: Abbot-Charnay Photograph Collection (Mss.913.72.Ab23)

Aimoré
Alternate forms: Botocudo
Language(s): English
Date: May 2, 1837
Type:Text
Extent: 2 pages
Description: Letter to Samuel Morton regarding Morton's work on American man. Can send only a drawing of a Botocudo skull, given to Blumenbach at Goettingen, found in his Decades Craniorum (1790-1828), plate 58. Skull of man of Rio Grande de Belmonte. Will get drawing of Charruas and Patagonians.
Collection: Samuel George Morton Papers (Mss.B.M843)

Osage | Quapaw | Kaw | Oto | Omaha | Comanche | Creek
Language(s): English
Date: 1834; 1837
Type:Text
Extent: 2 items
Description: Letters from Zina Pitcher and John Collins Warren discussing grave robbing of Indigenous ancestors' remains. Pitcher mentions difficulties in getting information about the deceased from Algonquians, who won't speak of the dead. Mentions Osages, Quapaws, Missouri, Kansas, Otos, Omahas; Chitimachas or Comanches; and the five tribes of the Creek nation. Warren lists American skulls in his collection: mostly eastern, except for Ancient Niagara and Chinook, not flattened, plus Ohio cavern and Ohio rock and Mound at Lexington; Algonquian from eastern Massachusetts. He talks of the Guanche cast from the Canaries and some unidentified skulls he has seen.
Collection: Samuel George Morton Papers (Mss.B.M843)

Apache | Arapaho | Cheyenne | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Cree | Dakota | Delaware | Kiowa | Ojibwe | Pojoaque | Santa Clara | Shawnee | Tohono O'odham | Wichita | Zuni
Alternate forms: Sioux, Papago, Pueblo, Ojibwa
Language(s): English
Date: 1870-1934
Extent: 5 folders
Description: The Eugenics Record Office Records consist of 330.5 linear feet of materials relating to the ERO, founded in 1910 for the study of human heredity and as a repository for genetic data on human traits. The Eugenics Record Office Papers (1670-1964) contain trait schedules, newspaper clippings, manuscript essays, pedigree charts, article abstracts, reprints, magazine articles, bibliographies, photographs, hair samples, postcard pictures, card files, and some correspondence which document the projects of the Eugenics Record Office during the thirty-four years of its operation. Of particular interest might be Folder "A:9770-1-118 Indians from Oklahoma (Work Sent in by Mr. Paul Roofe)" (1926), containing 118 pages of Individual Analysis Cards containing personal and family information about students at the Haskell Institute in Lawrence, Kansas. There is also "Folder A:9770 #1. Indian Photographs, Bureau of American Ethnography" (1870-1912), containing 23 photographs of Native individuals, all men, most with both front and profile shots, and identifying information on the back. Cultures represented include Kiowa, Brule (Dakota), Apache, Delaware, Papago (Tohono O'odham), Arapaho, Wichita, Zuni, Santa Clara (Pueblo), Shawnee, Pojoaque (Pueblo), Cheyenne, and Bannock. Folder "A:9770 #3. American Indians" (1920-1934) contains material about Bolivia Indians, Chippewas (Ojibwe) in Michigan, and from Dr. Margaret W. Koenig of the Nebraska Medical Women's League regarding the family history of Permela Palmer (Chicksaw), who married a Choctaw and then a white man, and who was of particular note because of her supernumerary mammary glands and the similarly abnormal breast development of some of her daughters. Folder "A:974 x 7. Caucasian x Indian" (1920-1925) contains trait charts of mixed families, including charts of a French-Cree and Choctaw family and a French-Cree and Scotch-Cree family sent by Mrs. L. M. William of Battleford, Sask.; a three-page typed essay, "For a Universial Marriage Law," advocating the prohibition of mixed marriages, also attributed to Mrs. William; and a magazine article, intended to be humorous, titled "Indian Wives and White Husbands" by Josiah M. Ward. Folder "A:976 x 70. American Indian - Negro" (1919-1928) contains charts, anecdotal data, notes, etc. regarding the traits of mixed children of Native and African American parents, several examples of which are stamped State Normal School, Montclair, NJ; a letter from the state registrar of Virginia to the Census Bureau concerning the efforts of people trying to gain recogition as Chickahominy, Rappahannock, and other groups despite having been previously been designated as "mullatoes," fear about such people having "broken into the census as Indians," and from there "have gotten across into the white race," and hopes to clarify matters for the 1930 Censuses; and materials (interviews, family trees, forms, notes) from a study directed by A. H. Estabrook and I. E. McDougle of the Sociology Department of Sweet Briar College--with fieldwork (such as interviews) performed by Sweet Briar students--titled "The Isshys, An Indian-Negro-White Family Group Near Amherest, Virginia."
Collection: Eugenics Record Office Records (Mss.Ms.Coll.77)

Atakapa | Natchez
Alternate forms: Atacapa, Ishak
Language(s): English
Date: 1834; 1839
Type:Text
Extent: 2 items
Description: Letters discussing grave robbing of Indigenous ancestors' remains. Letters from Joseph Barabino and William Byrd Powell regarding American Indian skulls and phrenology. Barabino informs Morton that he will visit Atakapas to secure skulls for Morton; he cannot identify the late Dr. Lebair's skulls. Powell compares Atakapa and Natchez skulls, criticizes Morton's use of single examples from each tribe, discusses his desire to take 500 specimens on a phrenological speaking tour in England, criticizes Combe's comments in Crania Americana, and alludes to a professional dispute.
Collection: Samuel George Morton Papers (Mss.B.M843)

Carib
Language(s): English
Date: April 1837
Type:Text
Extent: 1 page
Description: Letter discussing grave robbing of Indigenous ancestors' remains. Enclosed in letter to Charles Pickering. Head of fossil skeleton in Guadeloupe not Carib, but like Peruvian heads.
Collection: Samuel George Morton Papers (Mss.B.M843)

Cherokee
Language(s): English
Date: 1838
Contributor: Martin, James
Type:Text
Extent: 2 items
Description: Letters discussing grave robbing of Indigenous ancestors' remains. Correspondence regarding James Martin's collection of Cherokee skulls in North Carolina and Tennessee, where Martin was based at Fort Cass as medical director for Army to the Cherokee Nation. Martin has no flattened skulls as Morton has requested. Mentions Dr. Eugene H. Abadie in Florida; changing burial practices among Cherokees; various cave sites in Tinnipic and Cumberland River Valleys where skulls might be found.
Collection: Samuel George Morton Papers (Mss.B.M843)

Chickasaw | Cherokee | Choctaw
Language(s): English
Date: March 24, 1837
Type:Text
Extent: 1 page
Description: Letter discussing grave robbing of Indigenous ancestors' remains. Sends drawings of heads, one of an ancient tribe, flattened at back of head, from mound at junction of French-Broad and Holston rivers. Other from bank of Cumberland river above Nashville, probably of Chickasaw, Cherokee, and Choctaw nations said to visit here. They seem much alike in their living form to Troost.
Collection: Samuel George Morton Papers (Mss.B.M843)

Chinook | Guanche | Klickitat
Language(s): English
Date: 1835; 1837
Type:Text
Extent: 2 items
Description: Letters discussing grave robbing of Indigenous ancestors' remains. Letter from John Warren Collins including a list of American Indian skulls in his collection: Chinook, Mound Builder, and Algonquian. Has cast of Guanche skull from Canary Islands. Letter from John Kirk Townsend regarding a trunk full of remains he sent, including a few skulls, one of which is Klickitat; explains that with many falling to disease it is easier to take remains. In a postscript, he describes at length the manner of compressing the skull. Emphasizes that while some normal heads are seen, those individuals never attain any power or influence. His Chinook specimen was that of a chief.
Collection: Samuel George Morton Papers (Mss.B.M843)

Choctaw | Creek
Language(s): English
Date: December 16, 1832
Type:Text
Extent: 3 pages
Description: Letter discussing grave robbing of Indigenous ancestors' remains. Pitcher gives route for Mr. Conrad (conchologist) to go west, tells of migration of Choctaws, road, and explorations for land for them. Has a Creek skeleton he will send when the river gets high enough.
Collection: Samuel George Morton Papers (Mss.B.M843)