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Anishinaabe | Ottawa
Alternate forms: Odawa
Language(s): English | Ottawa
Date: 1947-1948, 2000
Type:Text
Extent: 0.5 linear feet
Description: Transcriptions and interlinear English translations by Howard Webkamigad of 13 Odawa (Anishinaabe) stories, 1 Odawa (annishinaabe) conversation, and 1 English story (transcription only), from wire recordings in Mss.Rec.1, "Ottawa material, 1947-1948."
Collection: Anishinaabe Language Tape Transcriptions of Anishinaabe Language Recordings by anishinaabe People from the Traverse Area of Michigan During the 1940s (Mss.SMs.Coll.20)

Haudenosaunee | Mohawk | Oneida | Onondaga | Tuscarora | Seneca
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): Italian
Date: 1790
Type:Text
Extent: 118 pages
Description: Count Paolo Andreani was an aeronaut, physicist, naturalist, and traveler. This is a translation of his travel diaries from originals owned by Count Antonio Sormani Verri, of Milan. Includes Frammenti de Diario, a fragment of a diary kept on a trip to Britain, circa 1783-1784; Viaggio da Milano a Parigi, journal of a voyage from Milan to Paris, 1784; Viaggi di un gentiluomo milanese, Giornale, typed transcriptions of the travels of a gentleman from Milan, containing notes on the Iroquois [Haudenosaunee] Indians, 1790; Giornale de Filadelfia a Quebec, journal from Philadelphia to Quebec, 1791; and, journal of a trip through New York state (including visits to Albany, the reservations of the Six Nations, Saratoga, and the Shaker community at New Lebanon), 1790. Of particular importance are his comments on the Haudenosaunee, from Albany to the Six Nations, pages 32-85, especially pages 45-85, which is copied in a typed transcript by Count Antonio Sormani Verri, 15 pages. Discusses the Oneida: dress, physical type, government, religion; discusses Tuscarora and Onondaga; comments on language of Mohawks. Vocabularies, sentences of Onondaga, Oneida, and Seneca.
Collection: Count Paolo Andreani journals, 1783?-1791 (Mss.Film.604)

Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Ojibwa
Language(s): English
Date: 1993
Type:Text
Extent: 1 volume
Description: Transcript of show "Ideas," copyright by the Canadian Broadcast Corp. Describes the drum ceremony created by Fairwind for the Ojibwa and A. Irving Hallowell's work on Fairwind's drum.
Collection: Fairwind's drum (Mss.970.3.M43f)

A'wa'etłala | Comox | Da'naxda'xw | Dzawada'enuxw | Gopenoxw | Gusgimukw | Gwa'sala | Gwatsinuxw | Gwawa'enuxw | Kwakwaka'wakw | Kwagu'ł | Kwakiutl | Kwikwasutinuxw | Ławitsis | Ma'a̱mtagila | Mamalilikala | Nakwaxda'xw | Namgis | Tłatłasikwala | Wiwekam | Wiweqayi
Alternate forms: Gwasilla, Gwawaenuk, K'omoks, Koskimo, Kwakiutl, Kwicksutaineuk, Laich-kwil-tach, Lekwiltok, Nakoaktok, Nakwoktak, Nimpkish, Quatsino, Tanakteuk, Tlowitsis, Tsawataineuk, Weiwaikai, Weiwaikum
Language(s): English | German | Kwak'wala
Date: 1893-1951
Extent: Approx. 10,000 loose pages, 10 notebooks, 7000+ cards, 10+ maps
Description: The Kwakwaka'wakw materials in the ACLS collection are located predominantly in the "Kwakiutl" section of the finding aid, which contains a full listing of all materials. Some of the larger individaul sets of materials listed within this section also have their own specific tables of contents (available upon request) detailing their often highly diverse contents. Overall, the vast majority of the material is made of of 1) manuscripts sent to Boas by George Hunt from the 1890s to the 1930s, frequently in both Kwak'wala and English, covering a very broad range of Kwakwaka'wakw history, culture, languages, customs, and traditions; and 2) field work materials recorded by Boas and Boas' own analyses of material sent by Hunt, covering a similar range of topics. Additional materials by other individuals focus especially on linguistic and ethnographic matters. Also see the "Kwakiutl materials, Franz Boas Papers," for information on the correspondence between Boas and Hunt, which gives additional context to the materials in the ACLS collection.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Makah
Language(s): English | Makah
Date: 1949 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 13 pages; 1 notebook; 750 cards
Description: The Makah materials in the ACLS collection consist of two items in the "Makah" section of the finding aid. Boas' "Makah lexicon" consists of 738 cards arranged in such categories as animals, parts of the body, natural objects, etc. Swadesh's field notes from 1949 consists of 1 field notebook and some loose pages, and include vocabularies, ethnographic notes, and texts. One text on tribal councils, told by George Swan, is a transcript of a recording included in Swadesh's "Nootka and Makah stories" audio collection, listed separately in this guide.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Montauk
Language(s): English
Date: 1764
Type:Text
Extent: 6 pages
Description: A transcript of Occom's "State of the Indians at Montauk on Long Island" from an original manuscript in the Yale Library. Concerns marriage, naming of children, religion, death practices. 2 pages of genealogical data on Maine Indians. [Printed, Occom, Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society, 1st series, 10: 108.]
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Nisga'a
Alternate forms: Nass,  Nisgha,  Nishga, Nishka,  Niska,  Nisqa'a
Language(s): English | German | Nisga'a
Date: circa 1894; After 1911; 1920
Type:Text
Extent: Circa 3,300 slips, 241 pages, 4 notebooks
Description: The Nisga'a materials in the ACLS collection consist primarily of materials in the "Nass (Nisga'a)" section of the finding aid. The earliest item is a roughly 500-word Nisga'a-English list compiled by Boas from his own work and that of Schulenberg's "Die Sprache der Zimshian-Indianer." There are subsequent texts and Vocabularies recorded by Boas, Sapir, and Stirling. Also included is the first half of a Nisga'a-German dictionary compiled by Boas, and an extensive lexicon by Stirling numbering over 3000 word slips. In the "Tsimshian" section of the finding aid, see also Boas' "Texts and Vocabularies in Tsimshian, Ts'ets'aut, and Nisga'a," which includes original field notes, texts (most published), song texts, musical scores, and some shorthand notes. Overall, matetrial described in the collection as "Nass" or "Nass River" are Nisga'a, though some may be intermixed among Tsimshian materials.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Anishinaabe | Ottawa
Alternate forms: Odawa
Language(s): English | Ottawa
Date: 1954; 1947
Type:Text
Extent: 157 pages
Description: The Odawa materials in the ACLS collection consist of two items in the "Ottawa" section of the finding aid. The largest item is Jane Willets' (later Ettawageshik) manuscripts created in conjunction with her audio recordings of Ottawa stories and songs. (These are listed separately in this guide.) Includes words lists, traditional (Nanabojo), historical, and autobiographical stories, with interlinear translations. Eusebia Hunkins' material includes musical scores derived from the Willets/Ettawageshik recordings.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Maliseet | Penobscot | Wabanaki
Alternate forms: Malecite
Date: 1933
Type:Text
Extent: 50 pages
Description: The Penobscot materials in the ACLS collection consist of a single item in the "Malecite" section of the finding aid. Sapir and Swadesh's "Notes on Penobscot and Malecite" primarily consists of Penobscot, with additional Maliseet vocabulary. It contains a Penobscot alphabet, text, and carbon copy of texts from records with interlinear translations, and lexical items on slips. Recorded in part with speaker Mitchell Attean.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Anishinaabe | Potawatomi
Alternate forms: Pottawotomi
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1950-1956
Type:Text
Extent: 24 folders; 1 box
Description: The Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers are a vast collection of materials relating to Wallace's work at the intersection of anthropology, psychology, and history. Though further research might yield more results, approximately 25 items directly pertaining to the Potawatomi have been identified. The majority of these materials are located in Series IX. Indian Claims, and relate to Wallace's work as a researcher and expert witness on behalf of Native American land claims. Research materials include notes on Potawatomi locations, political organization, and treaty signers by Wallace's assistant Michal Kane, two folders of Wallace's notes, a folder containing an ethnohistorical research paper by anthropologist and museum curator George Quimby, and "Regulations Books" containing reports on tribal history and treaties. Court materials include several dockets, trial memoranda, court findings and briefs, and hearing transcripts. There is also an essay by Wallace titled "Potawatomi Political System and Tribal Membership" and a folder relating to the financial aspect of Wallace's service. See also the Omer Call Stewart file in Series I. Correspondence and the research notecards in Series III. Notecards. See the finding aid for a detailed discussion of Wallace's long and varied career, and for an itemized list of the collection's contents.
Collection: Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.64a)