Current Filters
Click filter to remove
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3
A'wa'etłala | K'ómoks | Da'naxda'xw | Dzawada'enuxw | Gopinuxw | Gusgimukw | Gwa'sala | Gwatsinuxw | Gwawa'enuxw | Kwakwaka'wakw | Kwagu'ł | Kwikwasutinuxw | Ławitsis | Ma'a̱mtagila | Mamalilikala | Nak'waxda'xw | Namgis | Tłatłasikwala | Wiwekam | Wiweqayi | Ndau | Zulu | Heiltsuk
Alternate forms: Gwasilla, Gwawaenuk, K'omoks, Koskimo, Kwakiutl, Kwicksutaineuk, Laich-kwil-tach, Lekwiltok, Nakoaktok, Nakwoktak, Nimpkish, Quatsino, Tanakteuk, Tlowitsis, Tsawataineuk, Weiwaikai, Weiwaikum
Date: 1893-1951
Extent: Approx. 10,000 loose pages, 10 notebooks, 7000+ cards, 10+ maps
Description: The Kwakwaka'wakw materials in the ACLS collection are located predominantly in the "Kwakiutl" section of the finding aid, which contains a full listing of all materials (other relevant sections are "Northwest Coast", "Bella Bella (Heitsuk)", and item AfBnd.4 in "Non-American and non-linguistic material"). Some of the larger individual sets of materials listed within this section also have their own specific tables of contents (available upon request) detailing their often highly diverse contents. Overall, the vast majority of the material is made of of 1) manuscripts sent to Boas by George Hunt from the 1890s to the 1930s, frequently in both Kwak'wala and English, covering a very broad range of Kwakwaka'wakw history, culture, languages, customs, and traditions; and 2) field work materials recorded by Boas and Boas' own analyses of material sent by Hunt, covering a similar range of topics. Additional materials by other individuals focus especially on linguistic and ethnographic matters. Also see the "Kwakiutl materials, Franz Boas Papers," for information on the correspondence between Boas and Hunt, which gives additional context to the materials in the ACLS collection.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Ndau | Kwakwaka'wakw | Zulu
Language(s): Ndau | English | Kwak'wala | German
Date: 1921, 1947, undated
Type:Text
Extent: 218 p., ca. 1850 slips and 39 notebooks
Description: All Ndau materials in the ACLS collection are by C. Kamba Simango working with Franz Boas in the 1920s, or are derived from this. Three sets of texts (items AfBnd.4, AfBng.1 and AfBng.2) written by Simango describe topics including general home life, food, childrearing, marriage, religion and beliefs about death, and some autobiography. Some texts appear to have been later published as "Tales and Proverbs of the Vandau of Portuguese South Africa" (1922). The text items also include lexica, marginalia by Boas, a song, kinship terms and an illustration, and item AfBnd.4 "Texts on Ndau culture" also includes description of George Hunt's Kwak'wala language work. Item AfBnd.3 "Ndau lexica and ethnographic slips" contains ethnographic notes of mostly unidentified topics, but especially witchcraft, and 39 short notebooks of mostly Chindau lexica. The two main Chindau lexica (both "Chindau lexicon", items AfBnd.1 and AfBnd.2) total around 1700 slips. Zulu culture is also sporadically referenced in the above items. Finally, "An Analysis of Chindau, A Bantu Language of South East Africa" (item AfBnd.5) is an MA thesis by Joseph Rumberger derived from these materials. Boas published "Ethnographische Bemerkungen über die Vandau" in Zeitschrift Für Ethnologie 55(1), 1923 (in German) describing his work with Simango.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Kwakwaka'wakw | Ndau | Zulu
Language(s): Ndau | German | English | Zulu
Date: ca. 1920s
Type:Text
Extent: ca. 220 pages, 39 notebooks
Description: The Zulu material in the ACLS collection consists of brief references scattered throughout items AfBnd.3 and AfBnd.4, "Ndau lexica and ethnographic slips" and "Texts on Ndau culture" in the "Non-American and non-linguistic material" section of the finding aid. The extent and subjects of the Zulu material have not been fully evaluated, but they are believed to have come from Simango's knowledge, typically with reference to Ndau (Chindau).
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)