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Aimoré
Alternate forms: Botocudo
Language(s): English
Date: May 2, 1837
Type:Text
Extent: 2 pages
Description: Letter to Samuel Morton regarding Morton's work on American man. Can send only a drawing of a Botocudo skull, given to Blumenbach at Goettingen, found in his Decades Craniorum (1790-1828), plate 58. Skull of man of Rio Grande de Belmonte. Will get drawing of Charruas and Patagonians.
Collection: Samuel George Morton Papers (Mss.B.M843)

Osage | Quapaw | Kaw | Oto | Omaha | Comanche | Creek
Language(s): English
Date: 1834; 1837
Type:Text
Extent: 2 items
Description: Letters from Zina Pitcher and John Collins Warren discussing grave robbing of Indigenous ancestors' remains. Pitcher mentions difficulties in getting information about the deceased from Algonquians, who won't speak of the dead. Mentions Osages, Quapaws, Missouri, Kansas, Otos, Omahas; Chitimachas or Comanches; and the five tribes of the Creek nation. Warren lists American skulls in his collection: mostly eastern, except for Ancient Niagara and Chinook, not flattened, plus Ohio cavern and Ohio rock and Mound at Lexington; Algonquian from eastern Massachusetts. He talks of the Guanche cast from the Canaries and some unidentified skulls he has seen.
Collection: Samuel George Morton Papers (Mss.B.M843)

Atakapa | Natchez
Alternate forms: Atacapa, Ishak
Language(s): English
Date: 1834; 1839
Type:Text
Extent: 2 items
Description: Letters discussing grave robbing of Indigenous ancestors' remains. Letters from Joseph Barabino and William Byrd Powell regarding American Indian skulls and phrenology. Barabino informs Morton that he will visit Atakapas to secure skulls for Morton; he cannot identify the late Dr. Lebair's skulls. Powell compares Atakapa and Natchez skulls, criticizes Morton's use of single examples from each tribe, discusses his desire to take 500 specimens on a phrenological speaking tour in England, criticizes Combe's comments in Crania Americana, and alludes to a professional dispute.
Collection: Samuel George Morton Papers (Mss.B.M843)

Carib
Language(s): English
Date: April 1837
Type:Text
Extent: 1 page
Description: Letter discussing grave robbing of Indigenous ancestors' remains. Enclosed in letter to Charles Pickering. Head of fossil skeleton in Guadeloupe not Carib, but like Peruvian heads.
Collection: Samuel George Morton Papers (Mss.B.M843)

Cherokee
Language(s): English
Date: 1838
Contributor: Martin, James
Type:Text
Extent: 2 items
Description: Letters discussing grave robbing of Indigenous ancestors' remains. Correspondence regarding James Martin's collection of Cherokee skulls in North Carolina and Tennessee, where Martin was based at Fort Cass as medical director for Army to the Cherokee Nation. Martin has no flattened skulls as Morton has requested. Mentions Dr. Eugene H. Abadie in Florida; changing burial practices among Cherokees; various cave sites in Tinnipic and Cumberland River Valleys where skulls might be found.
Collection: Samuel George Morton Papers (Mss.B.M843)

Chickasaw | Cherokee | Choctaw
Language(s): English
Date: March 24, 1837
Type:Text
Extent: 1 page
Description: Letter discussing grave robbing of Indigenous ancestors' remains. Sends drawings of heads, one of an ancient tribe, flattened at back of head, from mound at junction of French-Broad and Holston rivers. Other from bank of Cumberland river above Nashville, probably of Chickasaw, Cherokee, and Choctaw nations said to visit here. They seem much alike in their living form to Troost.
Collection: Samuel George Morton Papers (Mss.B.M843)

Chinook | Guanche | Klickitat
Language(s): English
Date: 1835; 1837
Type:Text
Extent: 2 items
Description: Letters discussing grave robbing of Indigenous ancestors' remains. Letter from John Warren Collins including a list of American Indian skulls in his collection: Chinook, Mound Builder, and Algonquian. Has cast of Guanche skull from Canary Islands. Letter from John Kirk Townsend regarding a trunk full of remains he sent, including a few skulls, one of which is Klickitat; explains that with many falling to disease it is easier to take remains. In a postscript, he describes at length the manner of compressing the skull. Emphasizes that while some normal heads are seen, those individuals never attain any power or influence. His Chinook specimen was that of a chief.
Collection: Samuel George Morton Papers (Mss.B.M843)

Choctaw | Creek
Language(s): English
Date: December 16, 1832
Type:Text
Extent: 3 pages
Description: Letter discussing grave robbing of Indigenous ancestors' remains. Pitcher gives route for Mr. Conrad (conchologist) to go west, tells of migration of Choctaws, road, and explorations for land for them. Has a Creek skeleton he will send when the river gets high enough.
Collection: Samuel George Morton Papers (Mss.B.M843)

Language(s): English
Date: 1940-1945
Extent: .1 linear feet
Description: This collection of memorabilia includes clippings, postcards (one from Marion H. Dickson), a brochure, and an arrow-head (a gift from the site to Murphy D. Smith, who deposited these materials at the APS). Images from a 1945 article in the Peoria Morning Star on the establishment of the new historical state park at the site include several striking photos of an excavated burial site (described as containing 230 skeletons of Mound-builders who died in a devastating epidemic), including one with of a school group at the burial site and another highlighting Dr. Don F. Dickson's method of leaving the dead in situ; a photo of the Dickson family farmstead (on which the Dickson mounds were located) before the establishment of the state park; and a photo of reconstructed pottery displayed in the museum. There is also a brochure about the site as a tourist and educational attraction with information on the history of the mounts, the Dickson Mound Museum, the work of the Dickson family (primarily Dr. Don F. Dickson, Marion H. Dickson, and Thomas M. Dickson), and the neighboring Payne Collection of artifacts. Several images of the excavated mass burial indicate that it was expected to be the main attraction to visitors, and it is called the "greatest display of stone age man in the world...230 skeletons left in original positions." Views of the burial site are also featured on the two postcards. The Dickson Mounds Museum is still a branch of the Illinois State Museum, and the Dickson Mounds are now understood to be a Mississippian cemetery complex associated with nearby village sites and a ceremonial center.
Collection: Dickson Mound (Lewistown, Ill.) Memorabilia (Mss.970.6.D56)

Language(s): English
Date: 1811-1884
Type:Text
Extent: 4 items
Description: 1) Moses Fiske's description of skeletal remains found in basket burial in Warren County, Tennessee, in 1810. 2) Charles Willson Peale's catalogue of museum contents: "Indian curiosities, dresses, ornaments. Implements of agriculture, war, etc. of various nations. In the upper Room." Artifacts and articles of dress of western Indians (Lewis and Clark); ornaments from Ohio mounds; unidentified belts, pouches, and arrowheads. 3) Benjamin Franklin Peale's description of his collection of Material culture; thinks pottery fragments sent to him by Sellers are those of Mound Builders. 4) George Escol Seller's letter describing his artifacts from mounds in Ohio, 60 specimens of tools and cloth. Argues that Franklin Peale collected specimens to show the unity of mankind, while Sellers collects to find the variety of tools. Discusses Mound Builders at some length.
Collection: Peale-Sellers Family Collection (Mss.B.P31)