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Seminole
Language(s): English
Date: 1818
Contributor: Young, Hugh, -1822
Type:Text
Extent: 125 pages
Description: Hugh Young was an army officer and topographical engineer accompanying General Andrew Jackson's army in its operations against the Seminoles. This memoir includes sections on East Florida's boundaries, physical characteristics, navigation, Native customs, Spanish settlements, African Americans, agricultural products, and climate. Also included are itineraries for East and West Florida. One chapter is devoted to the Seminole and other aboriginal inhabitants of Florida, and includes names, numbers, settlements, war and treaties, councils, marriage, trade, amusement, etc. (pages 48-73). Printed, Boyd (1934). Original document owned by Francis W. Rawle, Albany, circa 1954. Also found on this reel is Benjamin Hawkins' Journal of occurrences in the Creek agency from January to the conclusion of the conference and treaty at Fort Williamson, 1802 (Film 692a).
Collection: A topographic memoir on East and West Florida, 1818 (Mss.Film.692b)

Innu | Naskapi | Atikamekw | Wabanaki | Delaware | Algonquin | Mashpee | Passamaquoddy | Wampanoag | Mi'kmaq | Penobscot | Maliseet | Muscogee | Menominee
Alternate forms: Menomini, Têtes-de-Boules, Têtes de Boules, Tete de Boule
Language(s): English | Abenaki, Eastern
Date: 1920-1940
Description: The materials from Algonquian speaking cultures is quite extensive, though scattered, in the A. Irving Hallowell Papers. One of the strengths is Hallowell's very fine black and white portraits of indigenous peoples located in Series VI, Subseries F, which includes images of Mashpee, Mohegan, Montagnais, Naskapi, Womponowag, Nipissing, Atikamekw, Series V contains some generalized materials such "Algoquian Cross Cousin Marriage," Speck's studies of northern Algoquian hunting territories, and Algonquin mythology and history. The folders entitled "Eastern Woodlands" in box 26 contain more culturally specific materials such as a Penobscot vocabulary list, Innu and Naswkapi material culture, and Delaware religions and ceremonies, although many of these are quite brief. The correspondence, in Series I, includes a letter from John Swanton discussing bear ceremonialism in Muscogee culture. George Herzog's correspondence includes Penobscot and Maliseet scores of war dance songs. There is also a letter from Jeffrey Zelitch, dated 1969, describing traditional ceremonies on the Lakota Rosebud reservation just before the American Indian Movement begins. George Spindler's lettter to describes a Medicine Lodge ceremony among the Menomini.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Apache | Arapaho | Cheyenne | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Cree | Dakota | Delaware | Kiowa | Ojibwe | Pojoaque | Santa Clara | Shawnee | Tohono O'odham | Wichita | Zuni
Alternate forms: Sioux, Papago, Pueblo, Ojibwa
Language(s): English
Date: 1870-1934
Extent: 5 folders
Description: The Eugenics Record Office Records consist of 330.5 linear feet of materials relating to the ERO, founded in 1910 for the study of human heredity and as a repository for genetic data on human traits. The Eugenics Record Office Papers (1670-1964) contain trait schedules, newspaper clippings, manuscript essays, pedigree charts, article abstracts, reprints, magazine articles, bibliographies, photographs, hair samples, postcard pictures, card files, and some correspondence which document the projects of the Eugenics Record Office during the thirty-four years of its operation. Of particular interest might be Folder "A:9770-1-118 Indians from Oklahoma (Work Sent in by Mr. Paul Roofe)" (1926), containing 118 pages of Individual Analysis Cards containing personal and family information about students at the Haskell Institute in Lawrence, Kansas. There is also "Folder A:9770 #1. Indian Photographs, Bureau of American Ethnography" (1870-1912), containing 23 photographs of Native individuals, all men, most with both front and profile shots, and identifying information on the back. Cultures represented include Kiowa, Brule (Dakota), Apache, Delaware, Papago (Tohono O'odham), Arapaho, Wichita, Zuni, Santa Clara (Pueblo), Shawnee, Pojoaque (Pueblo), Cheyenne, and Bannock. Folder "A:9770 #3. American Indians" (1920-1934) contains material about Bolivia Indians, Chippewas (Ojibwe) in Michigan, and from Dr. Margaret W. Koenig of the Nebraska Medical Women's League regarding the family history of Permela Palmer (Chicksaw), who married a Choctaw and then a white man, and who was of particular note because of her supernumerary mammary glands and the similarly abnormal breast development of some of her daughters. Folder "A:974 x 7. Caucasian x Indian" (1920-1925) contains trait charts of mixed families, including charts of a French-Cree and Choctaw family and a French-Cree and Scotch-Cree family sent by Mrs. L. M. William of Battleford, Sask.; a three-page typed essay, "For a Universial Marriage Law," advocating the prohibition of mixed marriages, also attributed to Mrs. William; and a magazine article, intended to be humorous, titled "Indian Wives and White Husbands" by Josiah M. Ward. Folder "A:976 x 70. American Indian - Negro" (1919-1928) contains charts, anecdotal data, notes, etc. regarding the traits of mixed children of Native and African American parents, several examples of which are stamped State Normal School, Montclair, NJ; a letter from the state registrar of Virginia to the Census Bureau concerning the efforts of people trying to gain recogition as Chickahominy, Rappahannock, and other groups despite having been previously been designated as "mullatoes," fear about such people having "broken into the census as Indians," and from there "have gotten across into the white race," and hopes to clarify matters for the 1930 Censuses; and materials (interviews, family trees, forms, notes) from a study directed by A. H. Estabrook and I. E. McDougle of the Sociology Department of Sweet Briar College--with fieldwork (such as interviews) performed by Sweet Briar students--titled "The Isshys, An Indian-Negro-White Family Group Near Amherest, Virginia."
Collection: Eugenics Record Office Records (Mss.Ms.Coll.77)

Swiss
Language(s): German | English | German, Walser
Date: 1917-1962
Extent: 2.5 linear feet
Description: Between around 1948 and 1950, Amelia Susman did fieldwork in Brienz, Switzerland, documenting the local variety of Highest Allemanic German as well as the social and economic organization of the village and surrounding areas. This is all contained within Series I. Of particular note are a reel-to-reel tape and some associated transcriptions, a set of 13 field notebooks, a lexical file, topically-arranged ethnographic notes, some correspondence with consultants (scattered throughout), and preparatory materials for several publications.
Collection: Amelia Susman Schultz Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.171)

Oneida | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1974
Contributor: Campisi, Jack
Type:Text
Extent: 520 pages
Description: This dissertation by anthropologist Jack Campisi was submitted to the State University of New York at Albany in 1974. The author organized the dissertation into chapters on methodology; war, trade, and change in Oneida society, 1600 to 1810; culture and history of the Wisconsin Oneidas; contemporary society of the Oneidas of Wisconsin; history and culture of the Oneida of the Thames; conflict and division in Oneida society, 1900-1934; contemporary society of the Oneidas of the Thames; the Oneidas of New York, 1840-present; and a conclusion with various approaches to comparing the ecologies, kinship systems, belief systems, political systems, and intra- and inter-tribal relations of the three communities as Campisi seeks to assess the evolving identities and ability to perform "boundary maintence" of each Oneida community. Campisi was a recipient of an APS Phillips Fund grant, and donated this item to the Society.
Collection: Ethnic identity and boundary maintenance in three Oneida communities (Mss.970.3.C15e)

Atikamekw | Dene | Hopi | Makah | Inca | Aruac | Yurok | Hupa | Huchnom | Maidu | Miwok | Cahuilla | Mojave | Pomo | Chukchi | Kwakwaka'wakw | Nuu-chah-nulth | Salish | Maya | Ktunaxa
Alternate forms: Athabaskan, Athapascan, Têtes-de-Boules, Têtes de Boules, Tete de Boule, Hoopa, Mohave, Kwakiutl, Nootka, Kutenai, Kootenai, Kootenay, Na:tini-xwe
Language(s): English
Date: 1920-1958
Type:Text
Description: Materials from a wide range of indigenous cultures around the world are scattered throughout Series V of the A. Irving Hallowell Papers. Hallowell was interested in comparative ethnology on a number of topics including Bear Ceremonialism, textiles, artistic representations of Native people, basketry, kinship, pre-history, the development of language, family and marriage, nets and netting, etc. Much of this material constitutes Hallowell's reading notes on secondary sources and his research for very broad-based studies of humanity. Geographic regions represented in Series V include Australia, Africa, Pacific Islands, Polar regions California, Northwest coast, Southwest, and Southeast. The correspondence, in Series I, includes a very interesting, brief description of Franz Boas' first visit to the Kwakwaka'wakw community of Fort Rupert by the daughter of George Hunt in a folder labled Ronald Rohmer. There is also a letter from Edward Sapir detailing Nuu-chah-nulth bear hunting and face painting as well as sketches of netting needles.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Hopi
Language(s): English | Hopi
Date: 1915; 1933-1941
Type:Text
Extent: 2 slips; 300+ pages
Description: The Hopi materials in the ACLS collection consist of materials primarily in the "Hopi" section of the finding aid. The earliest item is a brief word list recorded by Edward Sapir. The remaining items in this section are all by Benjamin Lee Whorf, including an initial linguistic report sent to Sapir, a grammatical sketch, an interlinear text on marriage customs, and a brief discussion of verb classes. In the "Bella Bella (Heiltsuk)" section of the finding aid, Boas' "Bella Bella suffix list" includes Hopi ethnographic materials on ceremony and religion written on the reverse side of sheets.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Haudenosaunee | Onondaga | Mohawk | Tuscarora | Oneida | Cayuga | Seneca
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English | Cayuga
Date: 1962
Contributor: Myers, Merlin G.
Type:Text
Extent: 315 pages
Description: This dissertation by anthropologist Merlin G. Myers was submitted to Cambridge University in 1962. The author focuses on the economic features and composition of household groups, political and ritual aspects of matrilineal descent, kinship and marriage, and the effects of these on the household group. He pays particular attention to variables relating to age, gender, and relations between generations. The study is based on Myers' field research in 1956-1958, during which he (accompanied by his wife, whose associations with Longhouse women led to some valuable insights) worked in both English and halting Cayuga. Among other sources, Myers had access to unpublished field notes of William N. Fenton, who also introduced Myers to members of the Six Nations Reserve. This item was a gift of William N. Fenton. Published by the University of Nebraska Press in 2006.
Collection: Household structure among the Longhouse Iroquois of the Six Nations Reserve (Mss.970.3.M99)

Arikara | Dakota | Cheyenne | A'aninin | Mandan | Omaha | Pawnee | Ponca
Alternate forms: Sioux, Gros Ventre
Language(s): French
Date: 1794-1796
Type:Text
Extent: 1 reel
Description: "Description abrègée du Haut-Missouri adressé: a Monsieur don Zénon Trudeau," an account of a journey up the Missouri River, with descriptions of the life and manners of the Indian tribes, prepared for Don Zenon Trudeau, Lieutenant Governor of the Country East of the Illinois (n.d., [after 1795]). Extracts from journals, June 7, 1794-June 1796 (part printed from copy in Department of State Archives, Washington), 190 pages. Approximately 200 pages of letters. Materials contain descriptions of the culture of the Plains Indians (Cheyenne, Arikara, Mandan, Pawnee, Gros Ventres, Sioux, Poncas), dress, customs, marriage, birth; calumet dance, sun dance, buffalo dance; warfare. Printed (in English translation), Trudeau (1914) and (1912) and Abel (1921). Original in possession of the Seminaire de Quebec.
Collection: Journal among the Arikara Indians, and other papers, 1794-1796 (Mss.Film.1036)

Kalapuya
Alternate forms: Atfatali, Tualatin
Language(s): English | Kalapuya
Date: 1915-1930
Type:Text
Extent: 430 pages
Description: The Kalapuya material in the ACLS collection is concentrated primarily in the "Kalapuya" section of the finding aid, which contains several manuscripts relating to Kalapuya language, folklore, and ethnology, primarily recorded by Leo Frachtenberg and Jaime de Angulo. Additional materials can also be found in the "Tualatin" section of the finding aid, which includes autobiographical stories and linguistic analyses.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)