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Cayuga | Cherokee | Chickasaw | Delaware | Wyandot | Mandan | Ojibwe | Seneca | Susquehannock
Alternate forms: Conestoga, Iroquois, Huron, Wendat
Language(s): Cayuga | English
Date: 1785-1806
Type:Text
Extent: 0.5 Linear feet, 2 boxes; 2 volumes
Description: A manuscript compiled from originals in the Historical Society of Pennsylvania by William L. McAtee. Concerns murder of John Armstrong by Indians; mentions Canestogae tribe, Cayahoga path, Cheerake, Chickasaw, Colonel Cresap; tuberculosis among Indians; Delawares; eloquence; Indian barrows, fortifications, and graves; Kash kask kunck; Mandan; Seneca, Six Nations, and Captain White Eyes. Also Crave Creek mound; Wyandot, Indian sugar camp; war customs and war party; treaty of December 1784 at Fort McIntosh with Chippewa and Wyandots; Indian burning; Indian diseases. Teedyuscung; Penn's treaty with the Delaware (1682 and 1702); meaning of "Geneseo"; Seneca battle with Koghquangians (Caughnawaga); Chickasaw; specimen of a Cayuga vocabulary with same list as that used in Barton (1797).
Collection: Benjamin Smith Barton journals; notebooks (Mss.B.B284.1)

A'aninin | Anishinaabe | Apache | Apache, Plains | Apache, Western | Arapaho | Arikara | Assiniboine | Blackfoot | Caddo | Catawba | Cayuga | Cherokee | Cheyenne | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Comanche | Creek | Crow | Delaware | Flathead | Haudenosaunee | Ho-Chunk | Hopi | Houma | Iñupiat | Iowa | Isleta | Kaw | Kickapoo | Laguna | Lakota | Mandan | Menominee | Meskwaki | Munsee | Nez Perce | Ojibwe | Omaha | Oneida | Oto | Ottawa | Penobscot | Pawnee | Ponca | Potawatomi | Quapaw | Seminole | Seneca | Shawnee | Shoshone | Stockbridge-Munsee | Tsimshian | Wabanaki | Wichita | Wyandot
Alternate forms: Arapahoe, Chippewa, Eskimo, Gros Ventre, Iroquois, Kansa, Lenape, Muscogee, Niimíipu, Odawa, Ojibwa, Ojibway, Salish, Sioux, Sac-and-Fox, Sauk-and-Fox, Winnebago, Wyandotte
Language(s): English
Date: 1939-1943
Extent: 0.25 linear feet
Description: There are a few items in the Frank G. Speck Papers currently identified as relating to Indian boarding schools.In the collection guide, under Subcollection 1, Series 1, in Section IV, "Southeast," see item IV(15H3), "Yuchi miscellaneous notes," which contains a letter from Ann Rolland (Haskell Institute), to Speck, April 6, 1941, as well as items under "C. Houma (Louisiana)" that relate to mission schools. In Section XIII, "Miscellaneous," see item XIII(22H), "Haskell Institute Roster," which lists of Native students and the Haskell Institute boarding school in 1939-1940, giving name, age, address, and tribe. (The tribes of the students included are listed above in this entry.) In Subcollection I, Series II, Biographical Material, see letters (listed alphabetically by author) from Leona E. Giger and Ann Rolland, both students at Haskell in the early 1940s. Also see letter from "Redge" and Gladys Laulin regarding Chippewa boy returning home for dances. In Series III, Photographs, there is an undated photograph [#10-14(a)] from the Shingwauk Indian Residential School. See also school-related photos in folders "Creek #3," "Eskimo [Inuit] (Labrador) #4," "Houma #1," #2, #7, and #8, "Pamunkey #6," and "Penobscot: People #2." In Series IV, Lantern Slides, there are slides of Native and Black students at the Hampton Institute. More boarding school-related material may be identified in the collection with further research.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Delaware | Shawnee | Ojibwe | Narragansett | Cherokee | Creek | Powhatan | Haudenosaunee | Mohican | Mandan
Alternate forms: Lenape, Chippewa, Ojibwa, Iroquois
Language(s): English | German | Delaware
Date: 1816-1822
Type:Text
Extent: 0.5 linear feet, circa 115 items
Description: Letters from Moravian missionary, historian, and linguist John Gottlieb Ernestus Heckewelder, mostly to Peter Stephen du Ponceau with one to Caspar Wistar. Some of the replies from Du Ponceau are copied in the letter books of the Historical and Literary Committee. Heckewelder most frequently wrote of the publications he was working on or revising, particularly his Account of the Indian nations (1819), Narrative (1820), Heckewelder (1821), a Mohican (Mohegan) vocabulary, remarks on a Swedish-Delaware vocabulary, etc., some of which were to be published or republished by the American Philosophical Society. Many letters thus revolve around the research, writing, and publishing processes, including Heckewelder's responses to du Ponceau's edits and suggestions; his own edits, additions, lists of errors, etc.; his concern that errors by the typesetter could bring criticism on linguistic portions; new information and discoveries, such as the finding of a Maqua (Haudenosaunee) manuscript in the Moravian Archives; negative reviews and criticisms of his work, like an objectionable review in the North American Review (1819), a review in the Westchester Village Record disputing the role of Delaware as women, and William Darby's disagreement about Heckewelder's account of the killing of Native people by Williamson and his men; more positive responses to his work, like an honorary membership in the Massachusetts Peace Society for his Account (1819); translation of his work into German and other languages; and his insistence that the American Philosophical Society imprimatur appear on the title page, because as a Moravian he could not publish anything on his own relating to the Society of the United Brethren. Heckewelder repeatedly touched on Native languages and matters of linguistics: among other things, he referred to the Native vocabularies he himself had collected; a Swedish-Delaware catechism and dispute over "r" or "l" sound; difficulties in hearing Indian languages properly; difficulties in writing Native American languages; comparisons between his own findings and linguistic materials and scholarship published by others (of whom he was often critical); several examples of Delaware or Lenape words, roots, paradigms, gender, usage, etc.; and comparions of Delaware to other Native languages like Ojibwe, Shawnee, Natick, and Narragansett. Heckewelder's letters reveal him to be well-read and immersed in a network of similarly-minded scholars trading information and forwarding books and articles. Specific works by others mentioned include the Steiner article in Columbian Magazine (September 1789); a Pickering-Du Ponceau Dencke's version of St. John's Epistles in Delaware; Zeisberger's Bible translation and Life of Christ; Poulson's paper relating Welsh to Powhatan (which Heckewelder deems incorrect on the basis that Powhatan was Delaware); Pickering's essay on a uniform Orthography and spelling; Eliot's Bible translation; a paper by Zeisberger on Delaware being made men again (#865) and Zeisberger's replies (#341) to 23 queries of Barton (#1636); Loskiel's history (Heckewelder notes general verification in Loskiel for specific incidents and believes that the absence of certain incidents in Loskiel's history is the result of missionary discretion); works by Barton (he criticizes Barton for seeking speedy answers to questions of Indian origins, and for thinking Delaware and Iroquois related); and various publications of the Historical and Literary Committee. Heckewelder also wrote about "Indian affairs" such as the Jefferson-Cresap dispute (over Logan speech and affair); Benton's resolution concerning the Christian Indians and Moravian land; the speech of a Delaware at Detroit, 1781; and Heckewelder's role in the Washington City Society for Civilizing the Indians. Ethnographic topics include Native American names, place names, childbirth, swimming, friendship, treatment of captives, derivation of "papoose," names of trees and rivers, and various anecdotes. Other individuals mentioned include Rev. Schulz, Butrick, Colonel Arent Schyler De Peyster, Captain Pipe, Vater, Hesse, Gambold, John Vaughan, Charles Thomson, Thomas Jefferson, Deborah Norris Logan, Mitchill, Daniel Drake, Abraham Steiner, Noah Webster du Ponceau's brother, etc. Heckewelder's letter to Wistar regarding the Naked Bear traditions was printed (except last paragraph) in the Transactions of the Historical and Literary Committee of the American Philosophical Society 1: 363.
Collection: John Gottlieb Ernestus Heckewelder letters, 1816-1822, to Peter Stephen Du Ponceau (Mss.497.3.H35o)

Arikara | Dakota | Cheyenne | A'aninin | Mandan | Omaha | Pawnee | Ponca
Alternate forms: Sioux, Gros Ventre
Language(s): French
Date: 1794-1796
Type:Text
Extent: 1 reel
Description: "Description abrègée du Haut-Missouri adressé: a Monsieur don Zénon Trudeau," an account of a journey up the Missouri River, with descriptions of the life and manners of the Indian tribes, prepared for Don Zenon Trudeau, Lieutenant Governor of the Country East of the Illinois (n.d., [after 1795]). Extracts from journals, June 7, 1794-June 1796 (part printed from copy in Department of State Archives, Washington), 190 pages. Approximately 200 pages of letters. Materials contain descriptions of the culture of the Plains Indians (Cheyenne, Arikara, Mandan, Pawnee, Gros Ventres, Sioux, Poncas), dress, customs, marriage, birth; calumet dance, sun dance, buffalo dance; warfare. Printed (in English translation), Trudeau (1914) and (1912) and Abel (1921). Original in possession of the Seminaire de Quebec.
Collection: Journal among the Arikara Indians, and other papers, 1794-1796 (Mss.Film.1036)

Kiliwa | Mandan
Language(s): Kiliwa | English | Mandan
Date: 2004
Type:Text
Extent: 1 folder
Description: William Bright conversed with Mauricio J. Mixco on the subject of Kiliwa and Mandan place names (Series 1).
Collection: William O. Bright Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.142)

Hidatsa | Mandan
Language(s): English | Hidatsa | Mandan
Date: 1967-1972
Extent: 11 sound tape reels (87 hr., 26 min.) : DIGITIZED
Description: This program consists of primarily of recordings converting Robert C. Hollow's Mandan dictionary into Hidatsa with the assistance of speaker James Driver. Most of the recordings consist of a Hidatsa word list elicited by the reading of English terms and phrases from the Mandan-English section of Robert C. Hollow's Mandan dictionary. The Mandan equivalents from the dictionary are infrequently given. Includes occasional discussion of context and usage of given words, as well as occasional comments on Hidatsa social life and customs. Also includes recordings analyzing the "Sacred Arrow Myth" that Bowers recorded with Sam Newman in Hidatsa in July 1932. James Driver also gives several narratives in Hidatsa on "Trip with Paul Ewald to family graves," "Data on tribal lands," "History of the Catholic Mission," and "Traveling to Minot," which in part concerns the Influenza Epidemic of 1918-1919. (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: Mandan-Hidatsa cultural change and language studies, Fort Berthold Reservation (Mss.Rec.84)

Hidatsa | Mandan
Language(s): English | Hidatsa | Mandan
Date: 1969
Extent: 19 sound tape reels (155 hr., 29 min.) : DIGITIZED
Description: Primarily consists of autobiographical stories, creation stories, and medicine stories collected by Alfred W. Bowers in earlier decades. The stories are read in segments in Bowers' English translation to two native consultants, who then translate the material into both Mandan and Hidatsa, or occasionally into either Mandan or Hidatsa alone. A small number of stories are told in Mandan only. Also includes English discussions of the Mandan and Hidatsa domestic life, material culture, personal reminscences, and histories of the Crow-Flies-High Band and the Fort Buford and Fort Berthold settlements. Bowers' original table of contents also available. Recorded at Fort Berthold Indian Reservation, North Dakota, in 1969. (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: Mandan-Hidatsa Ethnohistory and Linguistics (Mss.Rec.81)

Mandan
Language(s): English | Mandan
Date: 1936; 1933-1934
Type:Text
Extent: 472 pages
Description: The Mandan materials in the ACLS collection consist of two items in the "Mandan" section of the finding aid. Kennard's "Mandan folkloristic texts" contain 28 text with free and interlinear translations. Boas' "Mandan word list" consists of lexical items with English equivalents arranged by stem, with reference numbers to texts of Edward A. Kennard.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Mandan
Language(s): English | Lakota | Mandan
Date: circa 1930s
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 1 folder
Description: The Mandan materials in the Franz Boas Professional Papers consist of 1 folder labelled "Mandan and Teton Glossary," containing an unfinished 16-page word list.
Collection: Franz Boas Personal and Professional Papers (Mss.B.B61p)

Mandan
Language(s): English
Date: 1808?
Type:Text
Genre: Journals
Extent: 2 pages
Description: A brief description of the environment. Mentions Sioux, Mandan, Minnetaree.
Collection: Lewis and Clark Journals (Mss.917.3.L58)