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Apache | Arapaho | Cheyenne | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Cree | Dakota | Lenape | Kiowa | Ojibwe | Pojoaque | Santa Clara | Shawnee | Tohono O'odham | Wichita | Zuni
Alternate forms: Sioux, Papago, Pueblo, Ojibwa
Language(s): English
Date: 1870-1934
Extent: 5 folders
Description: The Eugenics Record Office Records consist of 330.5 linear feet of materials relating to the ERO, founded in 1910 for the study of human heredity and as a repository for genetic data on human traits. The Eugenics Record Office Papers (1670-1964) contain trait schedules, newspaper clippings, manuscript essays, pedigree charts, article abstracts, reprints, magazine articles, bibliographies, photographs, hair samples, postcard pictures, card files, and some correspondence which document the projects of the Eugenics Record Office during the thirty-four years of its operation. Of particular interest might be Folder "A:9770-1-118 Indians from Oklahoma (Work Sent in by Mr. Paul Roofe)" (1926), containing 118 pages of Individual Analysis Cards containing personal and family information about students at the Haskell Institute in Lawrence, Kansas. There is also "Folder A:9770 #1. Indian Photographs, Bureau of American Ethnography" (1870-1912), containing 23 photographs of Native individuals, all men, most with both front and profile shots, and identifying information on the back. Cultures represented include Kiowa, Brule (Dakota), Apache, Delaware, Papago (Tohono O'odham), Arapaho, Wichita, Zuni, Santa Clara (Pueblo), Shawnee, Pojoaque (Pueblo), Cheyenne, and Bannock. Folder "A:9770 #3. American Indians" (1920-1934) contains material about Bolivia Indians, Chippewas (Ojibwe) in Michigan, and from Dr. Margaret W. Koenig of the Nebraska Medical Women's League regarding the family history of Permela Palmer (Chicksaw), who married a Choctaw and then a white man, and who was of particular note because of her supernumerary mammary glands and the similarly abnormal breast development of some of her daughters. Folder "A:974 x 7. Caucasian x Indian" (1920-1925) contains trait charts of mixed families, including charts of a French-Cree and Choctaw family and a French-Cree and Scotch-Cree family sent by Mrs. L. M. William of Battleford, Sask.; a three-page typed essay, "For a Universial Marriage Law," advocating the prohibition of mixed marriages, also attributed to Mrs. William; and a magazine article, intended to be humorous, titled "Indian Wives and White Husbands" by Josiah M. Ward. Folder "A:976 x 70. American Indian - Negro" (1919-1928) contains charts, anecdotal data, notes, etc. regarding the traits of mixed children of Native and African American parents, several examples of which are stamped State Normal School, Montclair, NJ; a letter from the state registrar of Virginia to the Census Bureau concerning the efforts of people trying to gain recogition as Chickahominy, Rappahannock, and other groups despite having been previously been designated as "mullatoes," fear about such people having "broken into the census as Indians," and from there "have gotten across into the white race," and hopes to clarify matters for the 1930 Censuses; and materials (interviews, family trees, forms, notes) from a study directed by A. H. Estabrook and I. E. McDougle of the Sociology Department of Sweet Briar College--with fieldwork (such as interviews) performed by Sweet Briar students--titled "The Isshys, An Indian-Negro-White Family Group Near Amherest, Virginia."
Collection: Eugenics Record Office Records (Mss.Ms.Coll.77)

Cree | Flathead | Inca | Haudenosaunee | Kaingang | Kiowa | Maya | Natchez | Navajo | Ojibwe | Pawnee | Sahaptin | Purépecha | Seneca | Zuni
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Navaho, Ojibwa, Saulteaux, Sioux, Tonawanda, Tarascan, Tarasco
Language(s): English
Date: 1935-1937
Type:Text
Genre: Notes
Extent: 2 volumes, 150 p.
Description: These items include notes on "primitive economics" (Incan) for A. Irving Hallowell and from seminars with Linton Satterthwaite (on Mayan architecture), E. B. Howard (on problems of the Clovis site in New Mexico), and others at the University of Pennsylvania. There are also notes taken at the 1936 meeting of the American Anthropological Association of papers by various anthropologists in attendance, including Ruth Benedict, Frederica de Laguna, Waiter Dyk, William N. Fenton, Alfred V. Kidder, David G. Mandelbaum, George P. Murdock, Arthur C. Parker, Elsie Clews Parsons, Gladys A. Reichard, William A. Ritchie, Linton Satterthwaite, Gene Weltfish, and others regarding Cree, Flathead, Iroquois (Haudenosaunee), Kaingang (Southern Brazil), Kiowa, Mayan, Natchez, Navajo, Ojibwa, Pawnee, Pueblos, Sahaptin, Saulteaux, Siouan, Tarascan, Tonawanda (Seneca), Zuni, etc.
Collection: Ernestine H. Wieder Singer notes (Mss.970.1.Si6)

Anishinaabe | Hawaiian | Potawatomi | Paiute | Cheyenne | Dakota | Arapaho | Kiowa
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1942-1968
Extent: circa 28
Description: There are many items relating to Indigenous American languages in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. This entry is intended as a catch-all for materials that cover Indigenous American languages in general and might not show up in narrower searches. Researchers should also view the entries for specific languages and regions. For this more general category, there is relevant material in both Subcollection I and Subcollection II. In Subcollection I, there are 7 folders relating to Voegelin's intended publication "American Indian Language" in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries III-B: Works Authored by Voegelin [see also the associated material in Oversized]. Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-C: Other contains one file on inscribed stones and the Dene syllabary system and another on the Summer Linguistic Institute (in which many Native North American languages are mentioned). There are also two images of a stone inscribed with what were supposed to be Potawatomi petroglyphs in Series VII. Photographs. Also in Series VII are several language maps (i.e., "Indian language groups in the state of Illinois" and "American Indian Languages"), in which Algonquian languages are particularly well-represented. In Subcollection II, there is relevant correspondence with Wallace Chafe (regarding a census of speakers of indigenous languages), Kenneth Croft (regarding the state of American language work in Mexico, the use of mechanical recording equipment, Cheyenne materials, etc.), Samuel H. Elbert (regarding place names in Hawaii, comparison with Oceania and North America), Dell Hymes (regarding Anthropological Lingustics), Vernon E. Jake (regarding proposed language speaker census, particularly how to discern whether children really know the language), Luis S. Kemnitzer (a thank-you note in which Voegelin revealingly acknowledges, "Although I once worked with the Dakota language, I know little of its culture."), Jerome Kirk (a thank you known in which Voegelin asserts, "I've never found any speaker among the twenty American Indian languages I've worked with who got them [directional terms] straight."), and Morris Swadesh (many languages). Also in Subcollection II, there is a file of notes on classification of North American languages in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries XI. General; some "Ungrouped Tales," two folders with stories about Pechiha (Kickapoo?) and Yellow Horse (Arapaho?) attributed to Joe Pierce and Bruno Nettl, respectively, and a folder on sources in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries II. American Indian Tales for Children; and drafts, linguistic notes and maps in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries V. American Indian Languages.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Kiowa | Ponca | Shawnee | Cheyenne | Menominee | Ho-Chunk
Language(s): English
Date: 1885; 1936-1981
Description: The General Linguistics material in the Lounsbury collection can be found in Series II. It includes a broad array works ranging from archeoastronomy to maps to lectures presented by Lounsbury on the history of linguistics. Many of the items are secondary sources.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Arapaho | Caddo | Cherokee | Cheyenne | Comanche | Lenape | Kiowa | Meskwaki | Osage | Otoe | Odawa | Pawnee | Ponca | Quapaw | Seneca-Cayuga | Shawnee | Yuchi
Alternate forms: Arapahoe
Language(s): English
Date: 1973-1974
Genre: Songs | Speeches
Extent: 36 audiocassettes (33 hr., 53 min.)
Description: Recordings of powwows, benefit dances, wedding dances, dance competitions, and other permonances at various grounds in Oklahoma and Missouri from 1973-1974 by Sue Roark-Calnek. Includes round dances, stomp dances, war dances, gourd dances, snake dances, buffalo dances, hand games, and others. Dancers, singers, and staff are Arapaho, Caddo, Cayuga, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Delaware, Fox, Hopi, Kiowa, Osage, Ottawa, Oto, Pawnee, Ponca, Quapaw, Seneca, Shawnee, and Yuchi. Includes Delaware and Quapaw Pow-Wow, Osage Inloska Society, Arapaho Starhawk Society, Nevada (Mo.) Bushwhacker Days Pow-Wow, and White Oak Shawnee Night Stomp Dance, Kihekah Steh Pow-Wow, and Seneca-Cayuga Green Corn Ceremonial and Stomp Dance. Some materials may be restricted due to cultural sensitivity and privacy concerns.
Collection: Indian performances in Oklahoma (Mss.Rec.107)

Apache, Kiowa | Cheyenne | Comanche | Kiowa
Language(s): Apache, Kiowa | Comanche | English
Date: 1992-1993
Genre: Interviews | Songs
Extent: 13 audiocassettes (16 hr., 32 min.) : DIGITIZED
Description: Audio recordings of interviews with Cheyenne, Comanche, Kiowa, and Kiowa Apache consultants regarding military societies, related dances and ceremonial traditions, the participation of Indians veterans in the U.S. military during wars in the 20th century--including Comanche code talkers--and related topics. Also includes recordings of performances by the Comanche Tuhwi Society, Kiowa Black Legs Society, Kiowa Scalp & Victory Dance Songs, Kiowa children's songs, and some Kiowa folklore. Recorded by William C. Meadows in various locations in Oklahoma in 1992 and 1993. (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: Interviews on Cheyenne, Comanche, Kiowa, and Apache military societies (Mss.Rec.166)

Kiowa
Language(s): English
Date: 1994
Extent: 24 audiocassettes (29 hr., 4 min.)
Description: Consists of the researcher's personally dictated notes regarding his fieldwork, interviews, and research, as well as recordings of Kiowa Black Leggings Warrior Society Powwows and memorial services. These powwow and memorial service recordings may be restricted due to cultural sensitivity and privacy concerns.
Collection: Kiowa Belief Systems (Mss.Rec.280)

Kiowa
Language(s): English | Kiowa
Date: Undated
Contributor:
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 6 pages
Description: The Kiowa materials in the ACLS collection consist of a brief text and word list by an unidentified author, located in the "Kiowa" section of the finding aid.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Kiowa
Language(s): English | Kiowa
Date: Undated
Type:Text
Genre: Notes | Stories
Extent: 2 folders
Description: Two items relating to the Kiowa language have been identified in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. They are both in Subcollection II. One is a small subseries in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries VII. Kiowa-Tanoan, which contains primarily Towa (Jemez), Tiwa (Taos), and Tewa (Santa Clara and Hopi-Tewa) materials. The other consists of eight Kiowa stories (several featuring Sendeh) in the Plains Indian Tales category in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries II: American Indian Tales for Children. Researchers might also be interested in viewing the entries for other Tanoan languages.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Kiowa
Alternate forms: Kaiowa
Language(s): English | Kiowa
Date: 1927
Type:Text
Genre: Notebooks
Extent: 3 notebooks
Description: The Kiowa materials in the Elsie Clews Parsons papers consist of 3 "Kaiowa" notebooks found in Subcollection II, Series IV, "Research Notes." Some of this material may be restricted due to cultural sensitivity or privacy concerns. Additional relevant material may appear in correspondence folders.
Collection: Elsie Clews Parsons papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.29)