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Anishinaabe | Hawaiian | Potawatomi | Paiute | Cheyenne | Dakota | Arapaho | Kiowa
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1942-1968
Extent: circa 28
Description: There are many items relating to Indigenous American languages in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. This entry is intended as a catch-all for materials that cover Indigenous American languages in general and might not show up in narrower searches. Researchers should also view the entries for specific languages and regions. For this more general category, there is relevant material in both Subcollection I and Subcollection II. In Subcollection I, there are 7 folders relating to Voegelin's intended publication "American Indian Language" in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries III-B: Works Authored by Voegelin [see also the associated material in Oversized]. Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-C: Other contains one file on inscribed stones and the Dene syllabary system and another on the Summer Linguistic Institute (in which many Native North American languages are mentioned). There are also two images of a stone inscribed with what were supposed to be Potawatomi petroglyphs in Series VII. Photographs. Also in Series VII are several language maps (i.e., "Indian language groups in the state of Illinois" and "American Indian Languages"), in which Algonquian languages are particularly well-represented. In Subcollection II, there is relevant correspondence with Wallace Chafe (regarding a census of speakers of indigenous languages), Kenneth Croft (regarding the state of American language work in Mexico, the use of mechanical recording equipment, Cheyenne materials, etc.), Samuel H. Elbert (regarding place names in Hawaii, comparison with Oceania and North America), Dell Hymes (regarding Anthropological Lingustics), Vernon E. Jake (regarding proposed language speaker census, particularly how to discern whether children really know the language), Luis S. Kemnitzer (a thank-you note in which Voegelin revealingly acknowledges, "Although I once worked with the Dakota language, I know little of its culture."), Jerome Kirk (a thank you known in which Voegelin asserts, "I've never found any speaker among the twenty American Indian languages I've worked with who got them [directional terms] straight."), and Morris Swadesh (many languages). Also in Subcollection II, there is a file of notes on classification of North American languages in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries XI. General; some "Ungrouped Tales," two folders with stories about Pechiha (Kickapoo?) and Yellow Horse (Arapaho?) attributed to Joe Pierce and Bruno Nettl, respectively, and a folder on sources in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries II. American Indian Tales for Children; and drafts, linguistic notes and maps in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries V. American Indian Languages.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Hawaiian
Language(s): English
Date: 1926-1944
Extent: 2 folders
Description: The Eugenics Record Office Records consist of 330.5 linear feet of materials relating to the ERO, founded in 1910 for the study of human heredity and as a repository for genetic data on human traits. The Eugenics Record Office Papers (1670-1964) contain trait schedules, newspaper clippings, manuscript essays, pedigree charts, article abstracts, reprints, magazine articles, bibliographies, photographs, hair samples, postcard pictures, card files, and some correspondence which document the projects of the Eugenics Record Office during the thirty-four years of its operation. Hawaiian materials can be found in Series I. Trait Files. Folder "A:974 x 96. Caucasian x Hawaiian" (1942) in Box #62 contains an article about the many combinations of races in the Hawaiian Islands, with photos of people of Hawaiian, white, Filipino, Chinese, Korean, Spanish, Japanese, Samoan, Portuguese, Hindu, and Danish descent, and a slip noting a cross reference in Folder A:97-35-39. Folder "A:97ยท51 x 96. Chinese - Hawaiian" (1926-1927) in Box #64 contains a 1926 clipping (with photo) about Eleanor Lukela, possibly the "most perfect child" because of her Chinese-Hawaiian heritage; a three-page abstract from Porteus and Babcock about Chinese-Hawaiian traits; and a letter from Frank F. Bunker of the Carnegie Institute to Dr. Charles B. Davenport, director of the Department of Genetics, mentioning Bunker's own experience with "the splendid qualities of the children of Chinese and Hawaiian marriages," but drawing the attention to the importance of environment and parental involvement with the children rather than attributing it only to genetics.
Collection: Eugenics Record Office Records (Mss.Ms.Coll.77)

Hawaiian
Language(s): English | Hawaiian
Date: circa 1870s
Contributor:
Type:Text
Extent: 1 notebook
Description: The J.P. Lesley Papers include some Hawaiian language vocabulary located in Series III: Notebooks. See Notebooks 23: Philology.
Collection: J.P. Lesley Papers (Mss.B.L56)