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Apache | Arapaho | Cheyenne | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Cree | Dakota | Delaware | Kiowa | Ojibwe | Pojoaque | Santa Clara | Shawnee | Tohono O'odham | Wichita | Zuni
Alternate forms: Sioux, Papago, Pueblo, Ojibwa
Language(s): English
Date: 1870-1934
Extent: 5 folders
Description: The Eugenics Record Office Records consist of 330.5 linear feet of materials relating to the ERO, founded in 1910 for the study of human heredity and as a repository for genetic data on human traits. The Eugenics Record Office Papers (1670-1964) contain trait schedules, newspaper clippings, manuscript essays, pedigree charts, article abstracts, reprints, magazine articles, bibliographies, photographs, hair samples, postcard pictures, card files, and some correspondence which document the projects of the Eugenics Record Office during the thirty-four years of its operation. Of particular interest might be Folder "A:9770-1-118 Indians from Oklahoma (Work Sent in by Mr. Paul Roofe)" (1926), containing 118 pages of Individual Analysis Cards containing personal and family information about students at the Haskell Institute in Lawrence, Kansas. There is also "Folder A:9770 #1. Indian Photographs, Bureau of American Ethnography" (1870-1912), containing 23 photographs of Native individuals, all men, most with both front and profile shots, and identifying information on the back. Cultures represented include Kiowa, Brule (Dakota), Apache, Delaware, Papago (Tohono O'odham), Arapaho, Wichita, Zuni, Santa Clara (Pueblo), Shawnee, Pojoaque (Pueblo), Cheyenne, and Bannock. Folder "A:9770 #3. American Indians" (1920-1934) contains material about Bolivia Indians, Chippewas (Ojibwe) in Michigan, and from Dr. Margaret W. Koenig of the Nebraska Medical Women's League regarding the family history of Permela Palmer (Chicksaw), who married a Choctaw and then a white man, and who was of particular note because of her supernumerary mammary glands and the similarly abnormal breast development of some of her daughters. Folder "A:974 x 7. Caucasian x Indian" (1920-1925) contains trait charts of mixed families, including charts of a French-Cree and Choctaw family and a French-Cree and Scotch-Cree family sent by Mrs. L. M. William of Battleford, Sask.; a three-page typed essay, "For a Universial Marriage Law," advocating the prohibition of mixed marriages, also attributed to Mrs. William; and a magazine article, intended to be humorous, titled "Indian Wives and White Husbands" by Josiah M. Ward. Folder "A:976 x 70. American Indian - Negro" (1919-1928) contains charts, anecdotal data, notes, etc. regarding the traits of mixed children of Native and African American parents, several examples of which are stamped State Normal School, Montclair, NJ; a letter from the state registrar of Virginia to the Census Bureau concerning the efforts of people trying to gain recogition as Chickahominy, Rappahannock, and other groups despite having been previously been designated as "mullatoes," fear about such people having "broken into the census as Indians," and from there "have gotten across into the white race," and hopes to clarify matters for the 1930 Censuses; and materials (interviews, family trees, forms, notes) from a study directed by A. H. Estabrook and I. E. McDougle of the Sociology Department of Sweet Briar College--with fieldwork (such as interviews) performed by Sweet Briar students--titled "The Isshys, An Indian-Negro-White Family Group Near Amherest, Virginia."
Collection: Eugenics Record Office Records (Mss.Ms.Coll.77)

Guna
Alternate forms: Cuna, Kuna
Language(s): English
Date: 1924-1925
Extent: 2 folders
Description: The Eugenics Record Office Records consist of 330.5 linear feet of materials relating to the ERO, founded in 1910 for the study of human heredity and as a repository for genetic data on human traits. The Eugenics Record Office Papers (1670-1964) contain trait schedules, newspaper clippings, manuscript essays, pedigree charts, article abstracts, reprints, magazine articles, bibliographies, photographs, hair samples, postcard pictures, card files, and some correspondence which document the projects of the Eugenics Record Office during the thirty-four years of its operation. Kuna (formerly Cuna) materials include thirty-seven black and white 3 ¼" square silver gelatin photographs of the so-called "White Indians of Panama" located in Series I. Trait Files, Box $65, Folder "A:9861. White Indians - San Blas Coast" (1924-1925). As detailed in the accompanying World's Work article "Blond Indians of the Darien Jungle," Richard Olgesby Marsh photographed Kuna albinos in their village in 1924, and also encountered albinos among the indigenous peoples of mainland Panama. References to "White Indians" and "Albino Indians of Panama" also refer to the Kuna, who live in the San Blas Islands off the coast of Panama and who have the highest rate of albinism of any ethnic community in the world. Before geneticists discovered the DNA chromosome responsible, Marsh believed that the Kuna were descended from Vikings who arrived in the Americas before Columbus, and convinced the U.S. government to pressure Panama to set up the current autonomous governing structure of the Kuna. Folder "A:97728. Central America" (1925), also in Box #65, contains a list of seven individuals titled "Skin Color...San Blas Indians."
Collection: Eugenics Record Office Records (Mss.Ms.Coll.77)

Hawaiian
Language(s): English
Date: 1926-1944
Extent: 2 folders
Description: The Eugenics Record Office Records consist of 330.5 linear feet of materials relating to the ERO, founded in 1910 for the study of human heredity and as a repository for genetic data on human traits. The Eugenics Record Office Papers (1670-1964) contain trait schedules, newspaper clippings, manuscript essays, pedigree charts, article abstracts, reprints, magazine articles, bibliographies, photographs, hair samples, postcard pictures, card files, and some correspondence which document the projects of the Eugenics Record Office during the thirty-four years of its operation. Hawaiian materials can be found in Series I. Trait Files. Folder "A:974 x 96. Caucasian x Hawaiian" (1942) in Box #62 contains an article about the many combinations of races in the Hawaiian Islands, with photos of people of Hawaiian, white, Filipino, Chinese, Korean, Spanish, Japanese, Samoan, Portuguese, Hindu, and Danish descent, and a slip noting a cross reference in Folder A:97-35-39. Folder "A:97·51 x 96. Chinese - Hawaiian" (1926-1927) in Box #64 contains a 1926 clipping (with photo) about Eleanor Lukela, possibly the "most perfect child" because of her Chinese-Hawaiian heritage; a three-page abstract from Porteus and Babcock about Chinese-Hawaiian traits; and a letter from Frank F. Bunker of the Carnegie Institute to Dr. Charles B. Davenport, director of the Department of Genetics, mentioning Bunker's own experience with "the splendid qualities of the children of Chinese and Hawaiian marriages," but drawing the attention to the importance of environment and parental involvement with the children rather than attributing it only to genetics.
Collection: Eugenics Record Office Records (Mss.Ms.Coll.77)

Inuit
Alternate forms: Eskimo
Language(s): English
Date: 1908-1929
Extent: 3 folders
Description: The Eugenics Record Office Records consist of 330.5 linear feet of materials relating to the ERO, founded in 1910 for the study of human heredity and as a repository for genetic data on human traits. The Eugenics Record Office Papers (1670-1964) contain trait schedules, newspaper clippings, manuscript essays, pedigree charts, article abstracts, reprints, magazine articles, bibliographies, photographs, hair samples, postcard pictures, card files, and some correspondence which document the projects of the Eugenics Record Office during the thirty-four years of its operation. There are Inuit (formerly Eskimo) materials located in Series I. Trait Files. These include Folder "A:974 x 98. Caucasian x Eskimo" (1927), which contains correspondence (with sketches) of Herbert B. Wentz, M.D. to Harry H. Laughlin of the Eugenics Research Association, largely about the occurence of pigmentation in children of white and Native parents, but also with Wentz's descriptions of the unfair treatment toward Native Alaskans in medicine, education, and the reindeer industry. Folder "A:979 x 80. Caucasian - Eskimo" (1919) contains a single, brief anecdotal paragraph about an Inuit woman married to a white man. Folder "A:9798. Eskimos" (1908-1929) contains several newspaper clippings and articles (from Harpers, World's Work, The Literary Digest, The New York Times, etc.) relating to the Inuit, including Vilhjalmr Stefansson's article "Wintering Among the Eskimos"; newspaper clippings showing Mrs. Frank E. Kleinschmidt sharing a meal with Inuit women and children, Mrs. Kleinschmidt with an Inuit hunter, and an Inuit girl; Robert J. Flaherty's article "Wetalltooks' Islands: How the Remarkable Information and Native Map of One Wetalltook, an Esquimo, Suggested the Belcher Island Expedition" (with photos); Flaherty's article "How I Flimed 'Nanook of the North'" (with photos); "Knud Rasmussen's Artic Odyssey: The First of Two Articles by the Leader of the Fifth Thule Expedition" (with photos); William A. Thomas's "Health of a Carnivorous Race: A Study of the Eskimo"; a New York Times spread on Earl Rossman's expedition in Nunivak (with photos); Stefansson's "The 'Blond' Eskimos"; "Eskimos Under their Skin, as seen by Rasmussen" (with photos); and three pages of references to mentions of Eskimos in medical journals, two from the Journal of Immunology, Baltimore and one from Ugeskrift for Laeger, Copenhagen.
Collection: Eugenics Record Office Records (Mss.Ms.Coll.77)

Shinnecock
Language(s): English
Date: 1933 and undated
Contributor:
Extent: 2 folders
Description: The Eugenics Record Office Records consist of 330.5 linear feet of materials relating to the ERO, founded in 1910 for the study of human heredity and as a repository for genetic data on human traits. The Eugenics Record Office Papers (1670-1964) contain trait schedules, newspaper clippings, manuscript essays, pedigree charts, article abstracts, reprints, magazine articles, bibliographies, photographs, hair samples, postcard pictures, card files, and some correspondence which document the projects of the Eugenics Record Office during the thirty-four years of its operation. Shinnecock (a Long Island group descended from Pequot and Narragansett peoples) materials include Folder "A:9770 #2. Shinnecock Indians" (1933) in Series I. Trait Files, which contains a newspaper clipping of an article titled "Other Tribes May Dwindle But Shinnecock...," mentioning growth between the 1920 and 1930 censuses, as well as the educational, economic, and political divisions within the reservation; and an undated "Shinnecock Indians Pedigree Chart" in a folder of the same name, located in Series IX. Pedigrees (this is an oversized item).
Collection: Eugenics Record Office Records (Mss.Ms.Coll.77)

Taino
Alternate forms: Carib
Language(s): English
Date: 1922
Genre: Essays
Extent: 1 folder
Description: The Eugenics Record Office Records consist of 330.5 linear feet of materials relating to the ERO, founded in 1910 for the study of human heredity and as a repository for genetic data on human traits. The Eugenics Record Office Papers (1670-1964) contain trait schedules, newspaper clippings, manuscript essays, pedigree charts, article abstracts, reprints, magazine articles, bibliographies, photographs, hair samples, postcard pictures, card files, and some correspondence which document the projects of the Eugenics Record Office during the thirty-four years of its operation. Taino (Carib) materials include Folder "A:9780. South America" (1922) in Series I. Trait Files, Box #65, which contains a journal article titled "Discovering Diamonds in British Guiana: An American's Adventure in Opening Up the Treasure House on the Upper Mazaruni River" by William J. LaVarre, Jr., in which the author tells of locating diamond deposits through his association with Carib (Taino) villagers. The article includes textual descriptions and photos of indigenous individuals.
Collection: Eugenics Record Office Records (Mss.Ms.Coll.77)