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Apache | Arapaho | Cheyenne | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Cree | Dakota | Delaware | Kiowa | Ojibwe | Pojoaque | Santa Clara | Shawnee | Tohono O'odham | Wichita | Zuni
Alternate forms: Sioux, Papago, Pueblo, Ojibwa
Language(s): English
Date: 1870-1934
Extent: 5 folders
Description: The Eugenics Record Office Records consist of 330.5 linear feet of materials relating to the ERO, founded in 1910 for the study of human heredity and as a repository for genetic data on human traits. The Eugenics Record Office Papers (1670-1964) contain trait schedules, newspaper clippings, manuscript essays, pedigree charts, article abstracts, reprints, magazine articles, bibliographies, photographs, hair samples, postcard pictures, card files, and some correspondence which document the projects of the Eugenics Record Office during the thirty-four years of its operation. Of particular interest might be Folder "A:9770-1-118 Indians from Oklahoma (Work Sent in by Mr. Paul Roofe)" (1926), containing 118 pages of Individual Analysis Cards containing personal and family information about students at the Haskell Institute in Lawrence, Kansas. There is also "Folder A:9770 #1. Indian Photographs, Bureau of American Ethnography" (1870-1912), containing 23 photographs of Native individuals, all men, most with both front and profile shots, and identifying information on the back. Cultures represented include Kiowa, Brule (Dakota), Apache, Delaware, Papago (Tohono O'odham), Arapaho, Wichita, Zuni, Santa Clara (Pueblo), Shawnee, Pojoaque (Pueblo), Cheyenne, and Bannock. Folder "A:9770 #3. American Indians" (1920-1934) contains material about Bolivia Indians, Chippewas (Ojibwe) in Michigan, and from Dr. Margaret W. Koenig of the Nebraska Medical Women's League regarding the family history of Permela Palmer (Chicksaw), who married a Choctaw and then a white man, and who was of particular note because of her supernumerary mammary glands and the similarly abnormal breast development of some of her daughters. Folder "A:974 x 7. Caucasian x Indian" (1920-1925) contains trait charts of mixed families, including charts of a French-Cree and Choctaw family and a French-Cree and Scotch-Cree family sent by Mrs. L. M. William of Battleford, Sask.; a three-page typed essay, "For a Universial Marriage Law," advocating the prohibition of mixed marriages, also attributed to Mrs. William; and a magazine article, intended to be humorous, titled "Indian Wives and White Husbands" by Josiah M. Ward. Folder "A:976 x 70. American Indian - Negro" (1919-1928) contains charts, anecdotal data, notes, etc. regarding the traits of mixed children of Native and African American parents, several examples of which are stamped State Normal School, Montclair, NJ; a letter from the state registrar of Virginia to the Census Bureau concerning the efforts of people trying to gain recogition as Chickahominy, Rappahannock, and other groups despite having been previously been designated as "mullatoes," fear about such people having "broken into the census as Indians," and from there "have gotten across into the white race," and hopes to clarify matters for the 1930 Censuses; and materials (interviews, family trees, forms, notes) from a study directed by A. H. Estabrook and I. E. McDougle of the Sociology Department of Sweet Briar College--with fieldwork (such as interviews) performed by Sweet Briar students--titled "The Isshys, An Indian-Negro-White Family Group Near Amherest, Virginia."
Collection: Eugenics Record Office Records (Mss.Ms.Coll.77)

Cherokee | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: January 22, 1737
Type:Text
Extent: 2 pages
Description: Letter to Conrad Weiser regarding letters from Governor William Gooch of Virginia regarding persuading Cherokees to meet with the Six Nations. Weiser should help get the Indians to agree to meet.
Collection: Selections from the correspondence of the Honourable James Logan, 1699-1750 (Mss.B.L82)

Haudenosaunee | Cherokee | Catawba | Shawnee | Delaware | Wyandot | Miami | Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: January 22, 1736; 1744-1774; November 3, 1768; March 14, 1792; 1794; March 10, 1796; August 28, 1817; October 7, 1892; November 11, 1913; November 20, 1913; 1952; 1953-1954; September 1954; Undated
Type:Text
Extent: 14 items
Description: Relavent materials can be found in the finding aid under the specific dates listed. A variety of materials relating to the Haudenosaunee. Eighteenth-century materials include James Logan's treaty instructions to Conrad Weiser in 1736/7; examples of symbols used in treaty signatures by chiefs; miscellaneous items relating to treaties, Indian raids, and land transfers in Virginia;a 1768 deed of land to William Trent; using the Six Nations to make peace with western tribes; Indian agents' accounts, and a journal of a survey of Moravian lands in the Erie triangle translated and edited by Paul A. W. Wallace. Nineteenth-century materials include correspondence regarding Iroquois language and an Iroquois census. Twentieth-century materials include lectures given by Wallace and Leland (on Benjamin Franklin, and on the Deerfield massacre and Eleazer Williams' claim to be the Lost Dauphin, respectively); correspondence between Newhouse and Parker about Newhouse's manuscript history of the "Five Nations Union," the Society of American Indians and possible creation of a Society of Canadian Indians; and Snyderman's essay on ethnohistory, particularly through materials at the American Philosophical Society, Historical Society of Pennsylvania, the Quaker Historical Association, and the Haverford College Library. Other individuals mentioned include Shekallemy, Samuel Kirkland, Alfred, Street, Captain Brant, LIttle Billy, George Hoopaugh, Jacob Harmon, John Williams, Warham Williams, Madame de Pentigny, Captain John Stoddard, and John H. Hanson.
Collection: Miscellaneous Manuscripts Collection (Mss.Ms.Coll.200)

Haudenosaunee | Delaware | Shawnee | Susquehannock | Piscataway | Cayuga | Seneca | Onondaga | Mohican | Mohawk | Tuscarora
Alternate forms: Conestoga, Iroquois, Lenape, Ohio Indians
Language(s): English
Date: 1702-1753
Type:Text
Extent: 52 items
Description: Correspondence and other materials relating to Indian affairs. Topics include diplomacy with Six Nations, including various delegations to and from the Six Nations, diplomatic gifts and expenses, and Maryland's efforts to treat with anxieties about French intrigues, overtures, and inroads on Indian loyalty; land claims and disputes; Lancaster Treaty of 1744; two Delaware Indians accused of murder; Ohio Company; Indians' tensions with Virginians; and Indians in Ohio. Individuals (other than contributors) mentioned include Hotquantgoehle, Shickellamy, Andrew Montour, George Croghan, Colonel Burnett, Canasadego, Lord Cornbury, Indian Harry, Allumapis, and Lapaghpitton.
Collection: Selections from the correspondence of the Honourable James Logan, 1699-1750 (Mss.B.L82)

Nottoway
Language(s): English | Nottoway
Date: 1784
Type:Text
Extent: 3 pages
Description: The Nottoway materials in this collection consist of manuscripts listed in the finding aid as items 47 and 49, which are two letters relating to collection of Nottoway vocabulary and "Remarks on Indian names still to be found," with etymology of "Tuckahoe" and other Nottoway words, tracing them to Arabic and Hebrew roots.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Historical and Literary Committee, American Indian Vocabulary Collection    (Mss.497.V85)

Onondaga | Haudenosaunee | Susquehannock | Shawnee
Alternate forms: Conestoga, Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1703-1745
Type:Text
Extent: 4 items
Description: 1703 letter to William Penn regarding Jemmy le Tort, who had gone with Louis Lemoine in 1701; French have sent priest to the Onondagoes and New York's request to send away the priest has been refused. Indian Harry not around. Three later letters, 1737-1745 regarding Onondagas treating with Virginia;Conrad Weiser's importance to Indian affairs; neutrality of Onondagas in war between Britain and France; Shawnees led by Peter Chartier have robbed British traders and gone over to French.
Collection: Selections from the correspondence of the Honourable James Logan, 1699-1750 (Mss.B.L82)

Haudenosaunee | Oneida | Onondaga | Seneca | Cayuga | Tuscarora | Susquehannock | Shawnee | Nanticoke
Alternate forms: Conestoga, Iroquois, Six Nations
Language(s): English
Date: 1700-1757; ca 1815
Type:Text
Extent: 40 items
Description: Correspondence and other materials regarding Pennsylvania Indian affairs. Topics include Pennsylvania's relations with Native peoples; hostilities between Native groups and colonists in the backcountry; diplomatic overtures and councils between Native and colonial leaders; the fur trade; land claims and disputes; legal and illegal surveying of Indian lands; the Lancaster Treaty of 1744; copper mine opened by Governor Keith; anxieties about French influence over Indians and conflict with French over fur trade; role of gifts and payments for Indians; Indian roads; Virginians' desires to expand west; Native religious beliefs and morality; Count Zinzendorf's mission; the imprisonment and escape of Thomas McKee. Other individuals mentioned include Peter Bizaillon, Letitia Penn. Caxagan, Edward Shippen.
Collection: Selections from the correspondence of the Honourable James Logan, 1699-1750 (Mss.B.L82)

Powhatan
Language(s): Powhatan | English
Date: 1978
Type:Text
Extent: 1 folder
Description: Correspondence with Dale Kinkade in 1978 concerns the classification of the Pamunkey dialect of Powhatan (Series 1).
Collection: Daythal L. Kendall Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.148)

Powhatan
Language(s): English
Date: 1991-1992
Contributor: Gleach, Frederic W.
Type:Text
Extent: 335 pages
Description: The Powhatan materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 1 item, listed under "Gleach, Frederick": "English And Powhatan Approaches To Civilizing Each Other: A History Of Indian-White Relations In Early Colonial Virginia," a PhD thesis submitted to the University of Chicago (229 p.); report (2 p.); xeroxes of notes on archival materials from various libraries including the Newberry Library, the American Philosophical Society, and the National Anthropological Archives (104 p., xeroxed two to a page). Archival materials were gathered for the dissertation. The dissertation concerns various aspects of colonial relations between English colonizers and Powhatans (including war and trade), as well as Powhatan and Algonquian politics, cosmologies, and missionaries.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Powhatan
Language(s): English
Date: February 27, 1750
Type:Text
Extent: 1 page
Description: Tells of Ohio Company, its charter from the King; Lee's desire to treat with the Indians at Fredericksburg, and the falls of the Rappahannock.
Collection: Selections from the correspondence of the Honourable James Logan, 1699-1750 (Mss.B.L82)