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Mingo | Susquehannock | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Conestoga, Iroquois
Language(s): English | Tuscarora | Mohawk
Date: 1757-1771
Contributor: Sack, William
Type:Text
Extent: 1 vol., 10 p.
Description: Notebook with memorandum book, Fort Augusta, 1757-1771. Reference is made to Edward Shippen, Jr.; includes Tuscarora and Mohawk numerals; all copied in Indian vocabularies (Mss.497.In2). Memorandum book carries list of obligations, November 1764 - May 4, 1771. The vocabulary was taken from Will Sack, a Conestoga Indian, in January 1757 at Fort Augusta in the midst of the Seven Years' War. Sack would later become a controversial figure in Pennsylvania history. The Paxton Boys claimed he was a murderer and used his presence in the Conestoga's camp as pretext for their assault on the Conestoga Indians. The memorandum book contains the financial transactions of an unknown individual during the 1760s, although some evidence suggests that Edward Burd kept this memorandum book and vocabulary.
Collection: A vocabulary in the Mingo tongue taken from the mouth of William Sack, a Canistogo Indian. . . and memorandum book (Mss.497.3.V852m)

Arawak
Language(s): English
Date: 1820
Type:Text
Extent: 1 volume
Description: A record begun March 10, 1820, principally of chronology of early Pennsylvania, with mention of Penn-Logan correspondence and extracts from same. Arruwak words, page 11; extract, Narrative [of the late massacres], pages 132-133.
Collection: Peter Stephen Du Ponceau commonplace book (Mss.410.D92)

Catawba | Cherokee | Haudenosaunee | Seneca | Delaware | Shawnee
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Lenape
Language(s): English
Date: 1737-1751
Type:Text
Extent: 19 items
Description: Correspondence between James Logan, other royal and propriety officials, and various native groups regarding Indian affairs. Topics include Catawba relations with Cherokees, Six Nations, and other Indian groups; Catawba relations with various colonies; efforts to preserve peace among Britain's native allies; fears about effect of inter-Native warfare during King George's War; and efforts to arrange a peace treaty between the Catawbas and Six Nations. Individuals mentioned include Schermerhorn and Conrad Weiser.
Collection: Selections from the correspondence of the Honourable James Logan, 1699-1750 (Mss.B.L82)

Cayuga | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: November 21, 1748
Type:Text
Extent: 1 page
Description: Letter to Richard Peters stating that Shickellamy is going to Bethlehem, apparently as a convert. Weiser expects "nothing but mischief by these people" (meaning the Moravians).
Collection: Selections from the correspondence of the Honourable James Logan, 1699-1750 (Mss.B.L82)

Cherokee | Creek
Language(s): English
Date: 1757-1787
Type:Text
Extent: 4 items
Description: Correspondence to Benjamin and William Franklin regarding Cherokee War, Cherokee relations with Creeks, British and U.S. relations with Cherokees and Creeks, Indian activities and Pennsylvania's relations with Indians during the Seven Years' War era, Constitution Convention, and U.S. relations with Indians during early national period.
Collection: Benjamin Franklin Papers (Mss.B.F85)

Cherokee | Mohawk | Haudenosaunee | Creek
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Six Nations
Language(s): English
Date: 1758-1763
Type:Text
Extent: 2 items
Description: Two letters to Joseph Shippen. One (1758) mentions twelve Cherokees and one Mohawk en route to Philadelphia and then to Colonel Johnson. Cites cost of keeping them. The second (1763) discusses Indian attacks; mentions Cherokees and Creeks. Note on Indian movements near Fort Augusta and a copy of letter of James Irvine to Caleb Carnault, 15 June 1763, discussing strength of Fort Augusta.
Collection: Edward Shippen letters and papers (Mss.B.Sh62)

Cherokee
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1787
Type:Text
Extent: 1 Letter
Description: Describes dinner with Benjamin Franklin and visiting Indians. Indians include a "clever" young Cherokee; the "old King" and his wife. Amused at their "civilized" dress. Behaved well; Council also at banquet.
Collection: Hewson Family Papers (Mss.B.H492.b)

Cherokee | Delaware
Alternate forms: Lenape
Language(s): English
Date: 1757-1759
Type:Text
Extent: 4 items
Description: Letters to Richard Peters, Governor Denny, and the Commissioners for Indian Affairs mentioning Cherokees. Topics include 150 Cherokees, a few Hambus and Delaware warriors at Ray's Town camp; a report of six Cherokee who saw French army on move; and information received from Job Chillway. Also a long letter from Edmond Atkin to George Croghan giving account of the state of the southern Indian tribes.
Collection: Indian and Military Affairs of Pennsylvania, 1737-1775 (Mss.974.8.P19)

Cherokee | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: January 22, 1737
Type:Text
Extent: 2 pages
Description: Letter to Conrad Weiser regarding letters from Governor William Gooch of Virginia regarding persuading Cherokees to meet with the Six Nations. Weiser should help get the Indians to agree to meet.
Collection: Selections from the correspondence of the Honourable James Logan, 1699-1750 (Mss.B.L82)

Delaware | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Lenape, Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1991
Contributor: Lowe, Joan L.
Type:Text
Genre: Theses
Extent: 86 pages
Description: This senior thesis for honors in American History was submitted to the University of Pennsylvania in 1991. Lowe's advisors were Anthony F. C. Wallace and Edward C. Carter III. The author was inspired by Peggy Reeves Sanday and Carroll Smith-Rosenberg to develop a feminist perspective in her study of history, and approaches the "Delaware as women" trope accordingly to argue that Delawares adopted a "European gender discourse" that "contributed to the erosion of Delaware Indian culture." Lowe focuses on laying out the background of the "Delaware as women"problem; analyzing morality (particular sexual mores), gender roles, and the use of the word "petticoats" in the context of Delaware culture; the position of the Delawares in relation to the Six Nation; land disputes and agreements; the fur trade; religion, particularly Moravian missionaries and native prophets; and politics. Gift of Joan L. Lowe.
Collection: Colonial gender discourse and the Delaware Indians; 1991 (Mss.970.3.L948c)