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Mingo | Susquehannock | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Conestoga, Iroquois
Date: 1757, 1764-1771
Type:Text
Extent: 1 vol., 8 p. (vocabulary); 58 p. (memorandum book)
Description: Notebook with memorandum book, Fort Augusta, 1757-1771. Reference is made to Edward Shippen, Jr.; includes 6 pages of vocabulary identified as "Mingo", which may be Susquehannock or Seneca, then 1 page each of Tuscarora and Mohawk numerals; all copied in Indian vocabularies (Mss.497.In2). Memorandum book carries list of obligations, November 1764 - May 4, 1771. The vocabulary was taken from William Sack, a Conestoga Indian, in January 1757 at Fort Augusta in the midst of the Seven Years' War. Sack would later become a controversial figure in Pennsylvania history. The Paxton Boys claimed he was a murderer and used his presence in the Conestoga's camp as pretext for their assault on the Conestoga Indians. The manuscript then changes to the financial transactions of an unknown individual running from 1764 to 1771, although some evidence suggests that Edward Burd kept this memorandum book and vocabulary. This section runs 58 pages. It does not appear to containing any information on Indigenous languages, but may potentially contain information relevant to research Indigenous and settler interactions during this period.
Collection: A vocabulary in the Mingo tongue taken from the mouth of William Sack, a Canistogo Indian. . . and memorandum book (Mss.497.3.V852m)

Lenape | Shawnee | Haudenosaunee | Mohawk | Mingo
Alternate forms: Lenape, Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1756-1787
Type:Text
Extent: 18 items
Description: Correspondence and minutes of conferences relating to Pennsylvania's relations with Delawares, Shawnees, and the Haudenosaunee. Land deeds and purchases, the Treaty of Easton, the Seven Years' War era, the conflict called Pontiac's War and the surrender of the Delawares and Shawnees, the Treaty of Fort Stanwix, the Empress of Russia and her plan for a universal dictionary, Teedyuscung and his fitness for leadership are among the topics discussed.
Collection: Benjamin Franklin Papers (Mss.B.F85)

Lenape | Haudenosaunee | Cayuga | Miami | Shawnee | Nanticoke | Mohawk | Seneca | Susquehannock | Piscataway | Mingo
Alternate forms: Conestoga, Lenape, Iroquois, Conoy
Language(s): English
Date: 1725-1759
Type:Text
Extent: 27 items
Description: Correspondence and other materials relating to Indian affairs. Topics include land claims; treaties and diplomatic conferences; Indian complaints of dispossession and mistreatment; "Minguay" (Mingo?) expense of Indian diplomacy; illness and death of Allumapis; Conrad Weiser's activities in the service of the colony; Delawares and other Indians in Ohio; hanging of Indian in New Jersey; efforts to make the Haudenosaunee "overlords" of Pennsylvania's nearer Native neighbors; the Walking Purchase; Shawnees "making trouble"; fears of Indians going over to the French. Individuals mentioned include Allumapis, Christopher Pyrlaeus, Conrad Weiser, Shickellamy, Teedyuscung, Christopher Stump, Hugh Jones, Mannakahickan, Broken Thigh, Captain Newcastle, James Logan, Governor Ogle; Nutimus.
Collection: Selections from the correspondence of the Honourable James Logan, 1699-1750 (Mss.B.L82)

Lenape | Haudenosaunee | Shawnee | Nanticoke | Mohawk | Seneca | Onondaga | Meskwaki | Mahican | Wyandot | Ojibwe | Miami | Kickapoo | Mingo
Alternate forms: Lenape, Iroquois, Fox, Ojibwa
Language(s): English
Date: 1760
Type:Text
Extent: 1 reel
Description: Christian Frederick Post was a Moravian missionary and observer of Native peoples and cultures; he was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 1768. This journal of Post's, who was in the company of fellow colonist John Hays and Delaware leader Teedyuscung (and also mentions Delawares Isaac Still and Moses Tattamy), relates to Post's mission as a representative of the Governor and Council of Pennsylvania to the Ohio Valley Indians and the conference held near the Ohio River in 1760. Copy in clerk's hand. Concerning message carried to Mingos (Haudenosaunee, in the Ohio Valley) and other Ohio Indians, return of colonists taken captive during the Seven Years' War, and other happenings on the journey. Includes description of conjuring ceremony. This is a microfilm of an original in possession of Mrs. Henry P. Gummere.
Collection: Journal, 1760, of the great council of the different Indian nations (Mss.Film.204)