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Mingo | Susquehannock | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Conestoga, Iroquois
Date: 1757, 1764-1771
Type:Text
Extent: 1 vol., 8 p. (vocabulary); 58 p. (memorandum book)
Description: Notebook with memorandum book, Fort Augusta, 1757-1771. Reference is made to Edward Shippen, Jr.; includes 6 pages of vocabulary identified as "Mingo", which may be Susquehannock or Seneca, then 1 page each of Tuscarora and Mohawk numerals; all copied in Indian vocabularies (Mss.497.In2). Memorandum book carries list of obligations, November 1764 - May 4, 1771. The vocabulary was taken from William Sack, a Conestoga Indian, in January 1757 at Fort Augusta in the midst of the Seven Years' War. Sack would later become a controversial figure in Pennsylvania history. The Paxton Boys claimed he was a murderer and used his presence in the Conestoga's camp as pretext for their assault on the Conestoga Indians. The manuscript then changes to the financial transactions of an unknown individual running from 1764 to 1771, although some evidence suggests that Edward Burd kept this memorandum book and vocabulary. This section runs 58 pages. It does not appear to containing any information on Indigenous languages, but may potentially contain information relevant to research Indigenous and settler interactions during this period.
Collection: A vocabulary in the Mingo tongue taken from the mouth of William Sack, a Canistogo Indian. . . and memorandum book (Mss.497.3.V852m)

Lenape | Shawnee | Haudenosaunee | Mohawk | Mingo
Alternate forms: Lenape, Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1756-1787
Type:Text
Extent: 18 items
Description: Correspondence and minutes of conferences relating to Pennsylvania's relations with Delawares, Shawnees, and the Haudenosaunee. Land deeds and purchases, the Treaty of Easton, the Seven Years' War era, the conflict called Pontiac's War and the surrender of the Delawares and Shawnees, the Treaty of Fort Stanwix, the Empress of Russia and her plan for a universal dictionary, Teedyuscung and his fitness for leadership are among the topics discussed.
Collection: Benjamin Franklin Papers (Mss.B.F85)