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Otomi | Chitimacha | Atakapa | Cherokee | Osage | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Nottoway | Kaw | Omaha | Dakota | Pawnee | Nanticoke | A'aninin | Miami | Mi'kmaq | Seminole | Quapaw | Yuchi | Delaware | Ojibwe | Shawnee | Seneca | Mohawk | Onondaga | Cayuga | Oneida | Tuscarora | Natchez | Wyandot | Creek | Mohican | Mohegan
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Ojibwa, Huron-Wyandot, Atsina, Gros Ventre, Micmac, Lenape
Date: 1798-1821
Type:Text
Extent: 219 pages
Description: This volume contains extracts of Benjamin Smith Barton's "New Views of the Origin of the Tribes and Nations of America" (Philadelphia, 1797), with additions by Peter S. Du Ponceau. The bulk of the volume is comprised of word list of 54 words with equivalents listed in a range of 50-70 languages. While Barton listed no authority, Du Ponceau cited sources. Languages with words listed include Chitimacha, Atakapa, Cherokee, Osage, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Nottoway, Kansa, Omaha, Dakota, Pawnee, Nanticoke, Gros Ventres, Miami, Mi'kmaq, Seminole, Quapaw, Yuchi, Delaware, Ojibwe, Shawnee, Seneca, Mohawk, Onondaga, Cayuga, Oneida, Tuscarora, Natches, Wyandot, Creek, Mahican, Mohegan, and many others. The word list includes the terms for God, heaven, and sky, as well as various terms relating to kinship, parts of the body, weather, and more. The volume also includes notes on sounds of the Otomi (Othomi) observations on declension; observations about the Omaha, Kansa, Oto, Arkansas, and Missouri languages; and notes on symbol and sound. Also includes a newspaper clipping of a review (in German) of Barton's "New Views" that appeared in "Göttingische Anzeigen von gelehrten Sachen," June 17, 1799.
Collection: A comparative vocabulary of Indian languages (Mss.497.B28)

Delaware | Shawnee | Nanticoke | Wyandot | Mohican | Ojibwe | Wampanoag | Onondaga | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Huron, Ojibwe, Chippewa, Munsee, Iroquois, Six Nations, Lenape
Language(s): English
Date: 1816-1888
Type:Text
Extent: 8 items
Description: Materials relating to Alonguian languages and cultures, as well as to the publication of pieces on those subjects. Topics include an essay submitted by Reynolds on Algonquian metalsmiths; Tooker's request for a copy of Heckewelder's comparative Algonquian vocabularies for his work on Long Island place names; two letters revolving around Horsford's efforts to publish the American Philosophical Society manuscript of Heckewelder's comparative Algonquian vocabulary with his edition of Zeisberger's Onondaga dictionary; Du Ponceau on Native languages described as Huron, Delaware, Minsi, Mohicon, Natick, Chippeway, Shawanoe and Nanticoke; and two items relating to a manuscript found on the coast of Labrador which Du Ponceau presented to the APS in facsimile and which he believed to be Algonquian.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Algonquian | Massachusett
Language(s): English
Date: May 27, 1816; April 13, 1817; March 21, 1819; October 16, 1821; October 11, 1821; October 9, 1821; October 13, 1821; October 18, 1821; October 25, 1821
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 9 letters
Description: Concerns Indian linguistics including the Algonquian language family, translations, names of Indians, and a paper on "Indian linguistics" (the language has not been identified).
Collection: John Gottlieb Ernestus Heckewelder letters to Peter Stephen Du Ponceau  (Mss.497.3 H35o)

Arawak
Language(s): English
Date: 1819-1884
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 4 items
Description: Correspondence relating to Arawakan languages materials at the APS, particularly those assembled and deposited by Theodor Schulz. Du Ponceau thanks Schulz for his work on the Arawak language and writes to him about other South American languages, noting that he has copied Schulz's Arawak vocabulary into his book of 45 vocabularies and inquiring about men's and women's languages, DeLaet's vocabularies of Yaois, Sapajoi, etc., and Caraibi; Schulz contacts the APS secretary requesting permission for the Rev. N. O. Tank to use Schulz's Arawak manuscripts deposited at the APS; and Im Thurn requests a loan of Schulz's works on Arawak language.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Arawak
Language(s): English
Date: 1820
Type:Text
Extent: 1 volume
Description: A record begun March 10, 1820, principally of chronology of early Pennsylvania, with mention of Penn-Logan correspondence and extracts from same. Arruwak words, page 11; extract, Narrative [of the late massacres], pages 132-133.
Collection: Peter Stephen Du Ponceau commonplace book (Mss.410.D92)

Caddo | Creek | Natchez | Biloxi | Adai
Language(s): English | French
Date: 1821-1822
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 3 items
Description: Notes concerning Indian nations given to Peter S. Du Ponceau by Mr. Darby, giving locations of Caddo, Inies [?], Natchitoches, Apalachicolas, and Biloxi; a letter from Du Ponceau to John Sibley seeking Caddo and Natchez vocabularies of 150 words each and giving classes (from Jefferson word list?); and a letter from Du Ponceau to Friedrich von Adelung transmitting two of Sibley's manuscript vocabularies, Caddo and Adayes [Adai], and noting that his brother, Le Chevalier Du Ponceau, has prepared a translation of Heckewelder (1819).
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Carib
Language(s): English | French
Date: 1815-1834
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Genre: Notebooks
Extent: 9 notebooks
Description: Grammatical study based on Breton (1667). Includes auxiliary-verb conjugation; extracts on men's vs. women's speech taken from Davies (1666). List of words from DeLaet (1633)
Collection: Peter Stephen Du Ponceau notebooks on philology (Mss.410.D92)

Cayuga | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: Undated
Type:Text
Extent: 1 page
Description: Memorandum of conversation with Judge Peters [probably Judge Richard Peters of Pennsylvania] to the effect that Thomas Jefferson was unjustly charged with fabricating Logan's speech [presumably the well-known and controversial speech often called "Logan's Lament."]. Peters claimed he had seen it printed as part of a treaty long before.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Language(s): English
Date: 1815-1834
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 9 notebooks
Description: List of 26 languages of Guatemala in an extract from Bailey's translation of Juarros (1823).
Collection: Peter Stephen Du Ponceau notebooks on philology (Mss.410.D92)

Cherokee
Language(s): English | Cherokee
Date: 1818-1899
Type:Text
Extent: 8 items
Description: Items relating to Cherokee materials at the American Philosophical Society. Topics include a memorandum and letters written by Peter Stephen du Ponceau regarding Native languages, especially Cherokee; Du Ponceau, Abbe Correia da Serra, and John Vaughan's visit with two Cherokee boys being sent to school in Connecticut. One (Leonard Hicks) referred du Ponceau to Butrick's Cherokee grammar; D. S. Butrick's plan to prepare a Cherokee grammar modeled on Zeisberger's Delaware grammar, and other information on Cherokee language that he sent to du Ponceau upon the latter's request; Butrick's hope that these studies will aid the Cherokees, and his plea for attention to Cherokees seeking Christ; Frank Cushing's inquiries about a William Bartram manuscript once in possession of Samuel G. Morton according to notes of Ephraim G. Squier, and about a John H. Payne manuscript on Cherokees; and James Mooney's request about the location of John Howard Payne's manuscript on the Cherokee which was cited in Ephraim G. Squier's Serpent Symbol (1851). Other individuals mentioned include Colonel Return Jonathan Meigs, John Gambold, Isaac Minis Hays, and Rev. Samuel Worcester.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)