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Apache | Arapaho | Cheyenne | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Cree | Dakota | Delaware | Kiowa | Ojibwe | Pojoaque | Santa Clara | Shawnee | Tohono O'odham | Wichita | Zuni
Alternate forms: Sioux, Papago, Pueblo, Ojibwa
Language(s): English
Date: 1870-1934
Extent: 5 folders
Description: The Eugenics Record Office Records consist of 330.5 linear feet of materials relating to the ERO, founded in 1910 for the study of human heredity and as a repository for genetic data on human traits. The Eugenics Record Office Papers (1670-1964) contain trait schedules, newspaper clippings, manuscript essays, pedigree charts, article abstracts, reprints, magazine articles, bibliographies, photographs, hair samples, postcard pictures, card files, and some correspondence which document the projects of the Eugenics Record Office during the thirty-four years of its operation. Of particular interest might be Folder "A:9770-1-118 Indians from Oklahoma (Work Sent in by Mr. Paul Roofe)" (1926), containing 118 pages of Individual Analysis Cards containing personal and family information about students at the Haskell Institute in Lawrence, Kansas. There is also "Folder A:9770 #1. Indian Photographs, Bureau of American Ethnography" (1870-1912), containing 23 photographs of Native individuals, all men, most with both front and profile shots, and identifying information on the back. Cultures represented include Kiowa, Brule (Dakota), Apache, Delaware, Papago (Tohono O'odham), Arapaho, Wichita, Zuni, Santa Clara (Pueblo), Shawnee, Pojoaque (Pueblo), Cheyenne, and Bannock. Folder "A:9770 #3. American Indians" (1920-1934) contains material about Bolivia Indians, Chippewas (Ojibwe) in Michigan, and from Dr. Margaret W. Koenig of the Nebraska Medical Women's League regarding the family history of Permela Palmer (Chicksaw), who married a Choctaw and then a white man, and who was of particular note because of her supernumerary mammary glands and the similarly abnormal breast development of some of her daughters. Folder "A:974 x 7. Caucasian x Indian" (1920-1925) contains trait charts of mixed families, including charts of a French-Cree and Choctaw family and a French-Cree and Scotch-Cree family sent by Mrs. L. M. William of Battleford, Sask.; a three-page typed essay, "For a Universial Marriage Law," advocating the prohibition of mixed marriages, also attributed to Mrs. William; and a magazine article, intended to be humorous, titled "Indian Wives and White Husbands" by Josiah M. Ward. Folder "A:976 x 70. American Indian - Negro" (1919-1928) contains charts, anecdotal data, notes, etc. regarding the traits of mixed children of Native and African American parents, several examples of which are stamped State Normal School, Montclair, NJ; a letter from the state registrar of Virginia to the Census Bureau concerning the efforts of people trying to gain recogition as Chickahominy, Rappahannock, and other groups despite having been previously been designated as "mullatoes," fear about such people having "broken into the census as Indians," and from there "have gotten across into the white race," and hopes to clarify matters for the 1930 Censuses; and materials (interviews, family trees, forms, notes) from a study directed by A. H. Estabrook and I. E. McDougle of the Sociology Department of Sweet Briar College--with fieldwork (such as interviews) performed by Sweet Briar students--titled "The Isshys, An Indian-Negro-White Family Group Near Amherest, Virginia."
Collection: Eugenics Record Office Records (Mss.Ms.Coll.77)

Apache
Language(s): English | Apache
Date: 1938 and undated
Type:Text
Genre: Notes | Essays | Maps
Extent: 4 folders
Description: Three items relating to Apache languages have been identified in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. All are in Subcollection II. They include Apache material in a folder labeled "Athabascan (Chipewyan)" as well as a separate "Apachean" folder in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries II. Na-Dene. The "Apachean" folder contains a typescript version of "The Word" by Gladys Reichard (with a note from Reichard), a draft typescript with annotation of "The Apachean Verb, Part I: Verb Structure and Pronomial Prefixes," by Harry Hoijer, and Voegelin's notes on Hoijer's articles on Apachean. Finally, there is a Chiricahua Apache story ("Child-of-the-Water Kills Four Monsters") as well as a Taos story about an Apache youth ("An Apache Boy Takes a Redhead Scalp") in the Southwestern Indian Tales section of Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries II: American Indian Tales for Children. Apache languages (Chiricahua, Jicarilla, Mescalero, and Jano) are also represented on Harry Tschopik's map of "Indian Languages in New Mexico, A.D. 1600" (1938) in Subseries V: American Indian Languages. This item has been digitized and is available through the APS's Digital Library.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Apache
Date: undated
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 0.1 linear feet
Description: Mary Haas' short file of Apache languages consists of Swadesh lists, partially from work by Harry Hoijer, and lexical and grammatical comparisons with other languages, all in Series 2 and 9.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Apache
Language(s): English
Date: 1976, 2012-2015
Type:Text
Extent: 482 pages
Description: The Apache materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 2 items. (Materials specified as relating to particular Apache people, such Mescalero, Jicarilla, etc., can be found in separate entries in this guide.) Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under William Merrill and Margaret Pollak. The Merrill material is "An Investigation of Ethnographic and Archaelogical Specimens of Mescalbeans (Sophora secundiflora) in American Museums." The Pollak material is "An Ethnohistorical Study of Diabetes in an Urban American Indian Community," of which some of the anonymous interviewees are Apache.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

A'aninin | Anishinaabe | Apache | Apache, Plains | Apache, Western | Arapaho | Arikara | Assiniboine | Blackfoot | Caddo | Catawba | Cayuga | Cherokee | Cheyenne | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Comanche | Creek | Crow | Delaware | Flathead | Haudenosaunee | Ho-Chunk | Hopi | Houma | Iñupiat | Iowa | Isleta | Kaw | Kickapoo | Laguna | Lakota | Mandan | Menominee | Meskwaki | Munsee | Nez Perce | Ojibwe | Omaha | Oneida | Oto | Ottawa | Penobscot | Pawnee | Ponca | Potawatomi | Quapaw | Seminole | Seneca | Shawnee | Shoshone | Stockbridge-Munsee | Tsimshian | Wabanaki | Wichita | Wyandot
Alternate forms: Arapahoe, Chippewa, Eskimo, Gros Ventre, Iroquois, Kansa, Lenape, Muscogee, Niimíipu, Odawa, Ojibwa, Ojibway, Salish, Sioux, Sac-and-Fox, Sauk-and-Fox, Winnebago, Wyandotte
Language(s): English
Date: 1939-1943
Extent: 0.25 linear feet
Description: There are a few items in the Frank G. Speck Papers currently identified as relating to Indian boarding schools.In the collection guide, under Subcollection 1, Series 1, in Section IV, "Southeast," see item IV(15H3), "Yuchi miscellaneous notes," which contains a letter from Ann Rolland (Haskell Institute), to Speck, April 6, 1941, as well as items under "C. Houma (Louisiana)" that relate to mission schools. In Section XIII, "Miscellaneous," see item XIII(22H), "Haskell Institute Roster," which lists of Native students and the Haskell Institute boarding school in 1939-1940, giving name, age, address, and tribe. (The tribes of the students included are listed above in this entry.) In Subcollection I, Series II, Biographical Material, see letters (listed alphabetically by author) from Leona E. Giger and Ann Rolland, both students at Haskell in the early 1940s. Also see letter from "Redge" and Gladys Laulin regarding Chippewa boy returning home for dances. In Series III, Photographs, there is an undated photograph [#10-14(a)] from the Shingwauk Indian Residential School. See also school-related photos in folders "Creek #3," "Eskimo [Inuit] (Labrador) #4," "Houma #1," #2, #7, and #8, "Pamunkey #6," and "Penobscot: People #2." In Series IV, Lantern Slides, there are slides of Native and Black students at the Hampton Institute. More boarding school-related material may be identified in the collection with further research.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Apache | Chiricahua | Crow | Dakota | Lakota
Language(s): English
Date: Circa 1880-1900
Extent: 19 photographs
Description: The Ellen Lehman Native American Photograph Collection consists of 19 albumen prints of late nineteenth-century Native American leaders on cabinet cards. The bulk of the images date from the 1880s and portray important members of the Dakota Indian tribes, many of whom fought against the 7th Cavalry of the U.S. Army at the Battle of the Little Bighorn in 1876. Among the leaders depicted are: Sitting Bull, Gall, Rain in the Face, Crow King, and White Bull. The collection also includes two images of Geronimo, the Bedonkohe Apache leader who resisted Mexican and American expansion in the Southwest in the latter half of the nineteenth century. The majority of the photographs in the collection were taken by David Francis Barry, with Orlando Scott Goff and George W. Scott also contributing.
Collection: Ellen Lehman Native American Photograph Collection (Mss.SMs.Coll.16)

Cherokee | Apache | Caddo | Calusa | Ojibwe | Choctaw | Delaware | Gwich'in | Haudenosaunee | Inuit | Karankawa | Mattaponi | Meskwaki | Muscogee | Navajo | Onondaga | Pueblo | Seminole | Seneca | Shawnee | Sioux | Slave | Timucua | Tuscarora | Tutelo | Wyandot
Alternate forms: Chippewa, Creek, Eskimo, Fox, Kuchin, Kutchin, Loucheux, Ojibwa, Ojibway, Mvskoke, Sauk, Huron, Wendat
Language(s): English
Date: 1939-1945; 1947-Circa 1961; 1951-1962;
Type:Text
Extent: Circa 350 volumes; 75 photographs; 75 newspaper clippings; 70 manuscripts
Description: Research on culture primarily related to Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, Cherokee Nation, and United Keetowah Band.
Collection: Miscellaneous items pertaining to the American Indian (Mss.497.3.G41)

Apache | Navajo | Pawnee | Taos | Zapotec
Language(s): English
Date: 1861-1916
Type:Text
Extent: 19 items
Description: Narratives of travels and adventures, 1881-1864, 1881-1916, in the Far West, Southwest, Northwest, northern Mexico, as well as Ohio, New York, and Europe, apparently written from memory about 1916. Mentions hostilities of Pawnee and Apache, describing an Indian attack. Visits Pima Indians, Navajo reservation; sees Taos Indian dance. Observes Mitla ruins; visits Sacaton Pima reservation; visits California Indian schools. Describes music for Indians at mission; visits Ohio mounds; comments on Northwest Art; statues of Indian heroes in Northwest. Two letters relate to Ayer and the Field Museum. See especially #1, 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 19.
Collection: Reminiscences of the Far West, and other trips (Mss.B.Ay2)