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Otomi | Chitimacha | Atakapa | Cherokee | Osage | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Nottoway | Kaw | Omaha | Dakota | Pawnee | Nanticoke | A'aninin | Miami | Mi'kmaq | Seminole | Quapaw | Yuchi | Delaware | Ojibwe | Shawnee | Seneca | Mohawk | Onondaga | Cayuga | Oneida | Tuscarora | Natchez | Wyandot | Creek | Mohican | Mohegan
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Ojibwa, Huron-Wyandot, Atsina, Gros Ventre, Micmac, Lenape
Date: 1798-1821
Type:Text
Extent: 219 pages
Description: This volume contains extracts of Benjamin Smith Barton's "New Views of the Origin of the Tribes and Nations of America" (Philadelphia, 1797), with additions by Peter S. Du Ponceau. The bulk of the volume is comprised of word list of 54 words with equivalents listed in a range of 50-70 languages. While Barton listed no authority, Du Ponceau cited sources. Languages with words listed include Chitimacha, Atakapa, Cherokee, Osage, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Nottoway, Kansa, Omaha, Dakota, Pawnee, Nanticoke, Gros Ventres, Miami, Mi'kmaq, Seminole, Quapaw, Yuchi, Delaware, Ojibwe, Shawnee, Seneca, Mohawk, Onondaga, Cayuga, Oneida, Tuscarora, Natches, Wyandot, Creek, Mahican, Mohegan, and many others. The word list includes the terms for God, heaven, and sky, as well as various terms relating to kinship, parts of the body, weather, and more. The volume also includes notes on sounds of the Otomi (Othomi) observations on declension; observations about the Omaha, Kansa, Oto, Arkansas, and Missouri languages; and notes on symbol and sound. Also includes a newspaper clipping of a review (in German) of Barton's "New Views" that appeared in "Göttingische Anzeigen von gelehrten Sachen," June 17, 1799.
Collection: A comparative vocabulary of Indian languages (Mss.497.B28)

Beothuk
Language(s): English
Date: 1911-1922
Type:Text
Extent: 5 items
Description: Materials relating to Beothuk people, culture, and language. Includes correspondence from Franz Boas regarding a Beothuk report; from mining engineer Richard S. Dahl offering aid opening a Beothuk site; from James P. Howley concerning Speck's meeting with a Beothuk survivor, though Howley doubts the individual's authenticity (also includes a news clipping on Speck's discovery and a portion of Howley's book printing a Beothuk vocabulary with Speck pencil notes, 184-186); from William L. Messurier enclosing an article on Newfoundland extracted from "The Great Historical, Genealogical, and Poetical Dictionary" (London, 1701); and from Warren K. Moorehead discussing his New England archaeological field work and expressing doubt that Red Paint People of Maine were Beothuks based on the difference of art.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Catawba | Cherokee | Tutelo
Language(s): English | Catawba | Tutelo
Date: 1716; 1803; 1951-1997
Extent: 7 boxes
Description: The Catawba materials in the Frank Siebert Papers are primarily concentrated in Series II. These consist of copies of secondary sources such as an "Indian Vocabulary from Fort Christanna, 1716, Catawba census notes, 1830-1929, land claim agreements, and a dictionary of Place names in South Carolina. Original materials include hundreds of pages of Siebert's FIeld notes and a Catawba vocabulary / dictionary done with Wes Taukchiray.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Catawba | Cherokee | Quapaw
Language(s):
Date: 1900; 1940-1946; 1963-1997
Description: The Cherokee materials in the Siebert Papers consist a moderate range of items relating mainly to the Cherokee language. In Series IV, there are articles by Blumer, Masthay, Speck, Strom about the Cherokee language, as well as one item labelled "Quapaw and Cherokee - Linguistic Notes." In Series V, see "Linguistic Notes, Quapaw and Cherokee" (different from the item in Series IV), "Polly Wildcat, Cherokee." In Series VI, see articles by Hale and Witthoft. In Series XI, there is one studio portrait of an unidentified Cherokee child.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Cherokee
Language(s): Cherokee | English
Date: 1960s-2000s
Type:Text
Extent: 0.25 linear feet
Description: William Bright collected a small number of books on Cherokee language and culture, including a copy of the Cherokee Advocate newspaper (Series 2), as well as corresponding with Carl Masthay on Cherokee place names and with Pamela Munro on Cherokee linguistic analysis (Series 1).
Collection: William O. Bright Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.142)

Chumash
Date: 1959-1995
Extent: 0.25 linear feet
Description: Beginning with fieldwork in around 1959-1960 with Marie de Soto at Santa Barbara, California, Bright continued to collected materials in Chumashan languages and villages throughout his life. A short field notebook can be found in Series 3 Subseries 2, along with a large topical folder on Chumash in Series 4. Correspondence on “Hispanisms” (Spanish borrowings into Native languages, Series 1, and the card file in Series 5) is also of note.
Collection: William O. Bright Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.142)

Cupeño
Date: ca.1959-1975
Type:Text
Extent: 0.25 linear feet
Description: William Bright's small Cupeño collection consists of publications on Cupeño lexica, newspaper clippings collected during the 1960s, a history of a Californian mission (Series 2), and a comparative Takic language lexical slip file (Series 5).
Collection: William O. Bright Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.142)

Language(s): English
Date: 1940-1945
Extent: .1 linear feet
Description: This collection of memorabilia includes clippings, postcards (one from Marion H. Dickson), a brochure, and an arrow-head (a gift from the site to Murphy D. Smith, who deposited these materials at the APS). Images from a 1945 article in the Peoria Morning Star on the establishment of the new historical state park at the site include several striking photos of an excavated burial site (described as containing 230 skeletons of Mound-builders who died in a devastating epidemic), including one with of a school group at the burial site and another highlighting Dr. Don F. Dickson's method of leaving the dead in situ; a photo of the Dickson family farmstead (on which the Dickson mounds were located) before the establishment of the state park; and a photo of reconstructed pottery displayed in the museum. There is also a brochure about the site as a tourist and educational attraction with information on the history of the mounts, the Dickson Mound Museum, the work of the Dickson family (primarily Dr. Don F. Dickson, Marion H. Dickson, and Thomas M. Dickson), and the neighboring Payne Collection of artifacts. Several images of the excavated mass burial indicate that it was expected to be the main attraction to visitors, and it is called the "greatest display of stone age man in the world...230 skeletons left in original positions." Views of the burial site are also featured on the two postcards. The Dickson Mounds Museum is still a branch of the Illinois State Museum, and the Dickson Mounds are now understood to be a Mississippian cemetery complex associated with nearby village sites and a ceremonial center.
Collection: Dickson Mound (Lewistown, Ill.) Memorabilia (Mss.970.6.D56)

Atikamekw | Dene | Hopi | Makah | Inca | Aruac | Yurok | Hupa | Huchnom | Maidu | Miwok | Cahuilla | Mojave | Pomo | Chukchi | Kwakwaka'wakw | Nuu-chah-nulth | Salish | Maya | Ktunaxa
Alternate forms: Athabaskan, Athapascan, Têtes-de-Boules, Têtes de Boules, Tete de Boule, Hoopa, Mohave, Kwakiutl, Nootka, Kutenai, Kootenai, Kootenay, Na:tini-xwe
Language(s): English
Date: 1920-1958
Type:Text
Description: Materials from a wide range of indigenous cultures around the world are scattered throughout Series V of the A. Irving Hallowell Papers. Hallowell was interested in comparative ethnology on a number of topics including Bear Ceremonialism, textiles, artistic representations of Native people, basketry, kinship, pre-history, the development of language, family and marriage, nets and netting, etc. Much of this material constitutes Hallowell's reading notes on secondary sources and his research for very broad-based studies of humanity. Geographic regions represented in Series V include Australia, Africa, Pacific Islands, Polar regions California, Northwest coast, Southwest, and Southeast. The correspondence, in Series I, includes a very interesting, brief description of Franz Boas' first visit to the Kwakwaka'wakw community of Fort Rupert by the daughter of George Hunt in a folder labled Ronald Rohmer. There is also a letter from Edward Sapir detailing Nuu-chah-nulth bear hunting and face painting as well as sketches of netting needles.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Kiowa | Ponca | Shawnee | Cheyenne | Menominee | Ho-Chunk
Language(s): English
Date: 1885; 1936-1981
Description: The General Linguistics material in the Lounsbury collection can be found in Series II. It includes a broad array works ranging from archeoastronomy to maps to lectures presented by Lounsbury on the history of linguistics. Many of the items are secondary sources.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)