Displaying 1 - 4 of 4
Delaware | Shawnee | Nanticoke | Wyandot | Mohican | Ojibwe | Wampanoag | Onondaga | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Huron, Ojibwe, Chippewa, Munsee, Iroquois, Six Nations, Lenape
Language(s): English
Date: 1816-1888
Type:Text
Extent: 8 items
Description: Materials relating to Alonguian languages and cultures, as well as to the publication of pieces on those subjects. Topics include an essay submitted by Reynolds on Algonquian metalsmiths; Tooker's request for a copy of Heckewelder's comparative Algonquian vocabularies for his work on Long Island place names; two letters revolving around Horsford's efforts to publish the American Philosophical Society manuscript of Heckewelder's comparative Algonquian vocabulary with his edition of Zeisberger's Onondaga dictionary; Du Ponceau on Native languages described as Huron, Delaware, Minsi, Mohicon, Natick, Chippeway, Shawanoe and Nanticoke; and two items relating to a manuscript found on the coast of Labrador which Du Ponceau presented to the APS in facsimile and which he believed to be Algonquian.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Beothuk
Language(s): English
Date: 1911-1922
Type:Text
Extent: 5 items
Description: Materials relating to Beothuk people, culture, and language. Includes correspondence from Franz Boas regarding a Beothuk report; from mining engineer Richard S. Dahl offering aid opening a Beothuk site; from James P. Howley concerning Speck's meeting with a Beothuk survivor, though Howley doubts the individual's authenticity (also includes a news clipping on Speck's discovery and a portion of Howley's book printing a Beothuk vocabulary with Speck pencil notes, 184-186); from William L. Messurier enclosing an article on Newfoundland extracted from "The Great Historical, Genealogical, and Poetical Dictionary" (London, 1701); and from Warren K. Moorehead discussing his New England archaeological field work and expressing doubt that Red Paint People of Maine were Beothuks based on the difference of art.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Inuit
Alternate forms: Aivilik, Eskimo, Inuk, Inuttitut, Nunatsiavut
Date: 1883-1929
Extent: 184 pages; 2900 slips; 18 drawings
Description: The Inuit materials in the ACLS collection consists of several items in the "Eskimo" section of the finding aid. The core materials are Boas' fieldwork materials from Baffinland in 1883, his first fieldwork trip. "Eskimo ethnographic notes from Baffinland" includes vocabulary, texts, and ethnographic notes. "Eskimo texts" includes several text written in syllabic script, and includes other texts as well, some with interlinear translations, and additional vocabulary lists. This material comes from Hamilton Inlet (Labrador), Hudson Bay, and Cumberland Sound. "Eskimo interlinear texts" includes brief additional texts. Boas' "Eskimo lexicon" consists of an extensive German-Inuit vocabulary file of over 2900 slips. Boas' "Eskimo Songs" consists of song texts with translations. Lastly, "Eskimo folklore" consists of materials on stories, customs, and cooking and building methods, sent to Boas by George Comer, largely from the Southampton Island and Repulse Bay region. A table of content of the Comer materials is available upon request.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Inuit | Innu
Alternate forms: Eskimo, Montagnais
Language(s): English
Date: 1773-1774
Type:Text
Extent: 2 items
Description: Two items attributed to Sir Roger Curtis, an official of the British Royal Navy, from his time on the Labrador coast in the early 1770s: "Remarks upon the north coast of Labrador" (137 pages) and "An account of the Moravian mission upon the coast of Labrador in 1773" (15 pages). Some duplication. "Remarks" describes geography, the Esquimaux [Inuit] and their customs and physical type; compares them with the Montagnais [Innu]; and suggests sending an emissary who would live with them, learn their language, and persuade them of the friendship of the English so as to further trade and fisheries. Printed (in part), Curtis (1774). "An account" is one chapter of "Remarks," a brief account of the success of the mission in civilizing the Inuit, and the difficulties of converting them. Criticizes Inuit religious leaders who, using reason unaided by faith, ask difficult questions of the missionaries. Hopeful that mission activities will keep the Inuit from migrating and thus hurting trade. Mentions an Inuit woman who went to England. Proposes trip to far north.
Collection: Royal Society (Great Britain) miscellaneous correspondence and documents (Mss.Film.460)