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Coeur d'Alene | Spokane
Alternate forms: Schitsu'umsh
Language(s): Coeur d'Alene | English
Date: 1908; Circa 1910; 1930s
Type:Text
Extent: 435 pages; 1 notebook
Description: The Coeur d'Alene materials in the ACLS collection consist mainly of 3 items in the "Coeur d'Alene (Schitsu'umsh)" section of the finding aid. One is Reichard's "Coeur d'Alene Indian texts" (item S1g.1) containing 51 texts without translations. Two items (S1g.2 and S1g.3) recorded by James Teit consist of Coeur d'Alene vocabularies, some relating to material culture and religion. In the "Thompson (Nlaka'pamux)" section of the finding aid, Teit's "Field notes on Thompson and neighboring Salish languages" (item S1b.7) includes some Coeur d'Alene information, though the extent is undetermined as these notebooks are very complicated and have not yet been fully indexed. "Suffixes in Thompson, with variants in other Salish languages" (item S1b.12) contains some incidental Coeur d'Alene terms written in.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Ho-Chunk
Alternate forms: Winnebago
Language(s): English | Ho-Chunk
Date: 1938-1939
Type:Text
Extent: 281 pages, 11 notebooks
Description: The Ho-Chunk materials in the ACLS collection consists primarily of three items in the "Winnebago (Ho-Chunk)" section of the finding aid. The bulk of the material is Amelia Susman's 11 field notebooks, which contains texts with interlinear translation, Vocabularies, ethnographical and linguistic notes, and some songs. Two additional items also by Susman are extended analyses based upon field work with Sam Blowsnake and wife: "The accentual system of Winnebago" and "The Winnebago syllabary." In the "Chiwere (Iowa)" section of the finding aid, Gordon Marsh's "Materials for a study of the Iowa Indian language" include some Ho-Chunk grammatical notes, and Ho-Chunk cognates with Chiwere. Lastly, in the "Dakota" section, Franz Boas' "Miscellaneous Dakota notes" (item X8a.3) includes a Dakota-Ho-Chunk comparative word list.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Hopi
Language(s): English | Hopi
Date: 1960, 1963, 1965-1970, 1973, 1976-1978, 1988-1989, 1994, 2006
Extent: 1286 pages, 11 photographs
Description: The Hopi materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 18 items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Black, Cameron, Hodge, Jeanne, Kealiinohomoku, Masayesva, McChesney, Schepers, Seaman, Swanson, and Voegelin. Some of these materials may be restricted due to cultural sensitvity or privacy considerations.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Inuit
Alternate forms: Aivilik, Eskimo, Inuk, Inuttitut, Nunatsiavut
Date: 1883-1929
Extent: 184 pages; 2900 slips; 18 drawings
Description: The Inuit materials in the ACLS collection consists of several items in the "Eskimo" section of the finding aid. The core materials are Boas' fieldwork materials from Baffinland in 1883, his first fieldwork trip. "Eskimo ethnographic notes from Baffinland" includes vocabulary, texts, and ethnographic notes. "Eskimo texts" includes several text written in syllabic script, and includes other texts as well, some with interlinear translations, and additional vocabulary lists. This material comes from Hamilton Inlet (Labrador), Hudson Bay, and Cumberland Sound. "Eskimo interlinear texts" includes brief additional texts. Boas' "Eskimo lexicon" consists of an extensive German-Inuit vocabulary file of over 2900 slips. Boas' "Eskimo Songs" consists of song texts with translations. Lastly, "Eskimo folklore" consists of materials on stories, customs, and cooking and building methods, sent to Boas by George Comer, largely from the Southampton Island and Repulse Bay region. A table of content of the Comer materials is available upon request.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Kathlamet | Chinook | Clackamas
Alternate forms: Kiksht
Language(s): English | Kathlamet
Date: 1890-1895
Type:Text
Extent: 4 notebooks; approx. 2,600 slips
Description: The Kathlamet materials in the ACLS collection consist of items in two sections of the finding aid. In the "Chinook" section, Boas' notebooks 1, 2, and 4 of "Field notes on Chinookan and Salishan languages and Gitamat], Molala, and Masset " contain texts, ethnographic information, and grammatical notes. In the same section, Boas' "Miscellaneous notes on Chinookan languages" includes a text in an unidentified language and fragmentary slips of Chinook-Kathlamet comparisons. In the "Kathlamet" section, there is an additional field notebook by Boas, and two large, separate lexicons derived in part from his fieldwork.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Koasati
Alternate forms: Coushatta
Language(s): Alabama | English | Koasati
Date: 1934
Subject: Linguistics | Stories
Type:Text
Extent: 1 notebook
Description: The Koasati materials in the ACLS collection consist of a single notebook in the "Koasati" section of the finding aid, recorded by Mary Haas and Morris Swadesh. This contains a page of biographical and locational data, 575 Koasati forms with English equivalents, and 2 texts with interlinear translation.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Mattole
Language(s): English | Mattole
Date: 1907
Type:Text
Extent: 2 notebooks
Description: The Mattole materials in the ACLS collection consist of 2 notebooks in the "Mattole" section of the finding aid. These notebooks, recorded by Goddard in 1907, includes a detailed account in English of an Indian's explanation of topographical features connected with a Mattole settlement, a survey of Bear River sites, October 1907, and Mattole texts with interlinear translation. Also includes Vocabularies.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Nahua
Alternate forms: Aztec
Date: 1912-1924, 1928, 1930, 1940, 1949-1950, 1953
Type:Text
Extent: 359 pages, Circa 750 slips, 1 notebook (314 pages), 1 volume (168 pages)
Description: The Nahua materials in the ACLS collection consist of numerous items in the "Nahuatl" section of the finding aid, which contains a full listing. Prominent materials include texts recorded by Boas from Milpa Alta speakers, including Doña Luz Jiménez, in 1912. There are also additional texts, recorded by Miguel Barrios Espinosa in 1950 San Juan Tlilhuacan, Delegacion de Azcapotzales, Mexico City. Boas and Mason's "Nahautl vocabulary" contains 750+ word slips based upon work by Simeón and Mason. "Vocabulares Nawatl" by Leon and Swadesh consists of vocabulary of 3 Nahuatl dialects (identified as Telina, Ilamalan, and San Pedro [Atocpan?]) based on field work in 1939 with 4 speakers. There are additional grammatical studies and linguistic treatments by Whorf, Barlow, Croft, and Ripley. Some Nahuatl vocabulary can also be found in comparative Uto-Aztecan materials in the "Uto-Aztecan" section of the finding aid.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Nuxalk
Alternate forms: Bella Coola, Bellacoola
Language(s): English | German | Nuxalk
Date: 1937 and undated
Extent: approx. 150 pages, and 1 notebook
Description: The Nuxalk materials in the ACLS collection consist of items in multiple sections of the finding aid. In the "Bella Coola" section, there are Boas' working ethnographic notes with some linguistic information, with page references to other unidentified documents, and Newman's "grammatical summaries" giving analysis of different aspects of the Nuxalk language. In the "Chinook" section of the finding aid, Boas' "Field notes on Chinookan and Salishan languages and Gitamat], Molala, and Masset," notebook 3 includes Nuxalk vocabulary and ethnographic notes, partially written in German shorthand. Finally, in the "Kwakiutl" section of the finding aid, Boas' "Kwakiutl ethnographic notes" (item 29) includes pencil sketches of Bella Coola houses, and Boas & Hunt's "Kwakiutl ethnographic materials" (item 31), includes an origin story of the "Naxalkem" (presumably Nuxalk), written in English by Hunt.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Pentlatch
Alternate forms: Coast Salish, Puntlatch, Puntledge
Language(s): English | German | Pentlatch
Date: 1886, circa 1890, 1900, circa 1910
Subject: Linguistics | Stories
Type:Text
Extent: 217 pages, 2 slips
Description: The Pentlatch materials in the ACLS collection consist of 3 items in 3 different sections of the finding aid. The "Pentlatch" section includes materials from Boas' recording of Pentlatch language at Comox in 1886 and subsequent analysis. It contains English-Pentlatch and Pentlatch-English vocabulary, and texts with interlinear translation in German. In the "Comox" section, "Comox and Pentlatch texts" contains 15 texts with interlinear translations. (The number that are Pentlatch is undetermined.) Lastly, in the "Salish" section of the finding aid, Boas' "Comparative vocabularies of eight Salishan languages" includes Pentlatch vocabulary derived from earlier field work.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)