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A'aninin | Anishinaabe | Apache | Apache, Plains | Apache, Western | Arapaho | Arikara | Assiniboine | Blackfoot | Caddo | Catawba | Cayuga | Cherokee | Cheyenne | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Comanche | Creek | Crow | Delaware | Flathead | Haudenosaunee | Ho-Chunk | Hopi | Houma | Iñupiat | Iowa | Isleta | Kaw | Kickapoo | Laguna | Lakota | Mandan | Menominee | Meskwaki | Munsee | Nez Perce | Ojibwe | Omaha | Oneida | Oto | Ottawa | Penobscot | Pawnee | Ponca | Potawatomi | Quapaw | Seminole | Seneca | Shawnee | Shoshone | Stockbridge-Munsee | Tsimshian | Wabanaki | Wichita | Wyandot
Alternate forms: Arapahoe, Chippewa, Eskimo, Gros Ventre, Iroquois, Kansa, Lenape, Muscogee, Niimíipu, Odawa, Ojibwa, Ojibway, Salish, Sioux, Sac-and-Fox, Sauk-and-Fox, Winnebago, Wyandotte
Language(s): English
Date: 1939-1943
Extent: 0.25 linear feet
Description: There are a few items in the Frank G. Speck Papers currently identified as relating to Indian boarding schools.In the collection guide, under Subcollection 1, Series 1, in Section IV, "Southeast," see item IV(15H3), "Yuchi miscellaneous notes," which contains a letter from Ann Rolland (Haskell Institute), to Speck, April 6, 1941, as well as items under "C. Houma (Louisiana)" that relate to mission schools. In Section XIII, "Miscellaneous," see item XIII(22H), "Haskell Institute Roster," which lists of Native students and the Haskell Institute boarding school in 1939-1940, giving name, age, address, and tribe. (The tribes of the students included are listed above in this entry.) In Subcollection I, Series II, Biographical Material, see letters (listed alphabetically by author) from Leona E. Giger and Ann Rolland, both students at Haskell in the early 1940s. Also see letter from "Redge" and Gladys Laulin regarding Chippewa boy returning home for dances. In Series III, Photographs, there is an undated photograph [#10-14(a)] from the Shingwauk Indian Residential School. See also school-related photos in folders "Creek #3," "Eskimo [Inuit] (Labrador) #4," "Houma #1," #2, #7, and #8, "Pamunkey #6," and "Penobscot: People #2." In Series IV, Lantern Slides, there are slides of Native and Black students at the Hampton Institute. More boarding school-related material may be identified in the collection with further research.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Kiowa | Ponca | Shawnee | Cheyenne | Menominee | Ho-Chunk
Language(s): English
Date: 1885; 1936-1981
Description: The General Linguistics material in the Lounsbury collection can be found in Series II. It includes a broad array works ranging from archeoastronomy to maps to lectures presented by Lounsbury on the history of linguistics. Many of the items are secondary sources.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Ho-Chunk | Tsimshian
Alternate forms: Winnebago
Language(s): English | Ho-Chunk
Date: 1938-1939
Type:Text
Extent: 281 pages, 11 notebooks
Description: The Ho-Chunk materials in the ACLS collection consists primarily of three items in the "Winnebago (Ho-Chunk)" section of the finding aid. The bulk of the material is Amelia Susman's 11 field notebooks, which contains texts with interlinear translation, Vocabularies, ethnographical and linguistic notes, and some songs. Two additional items also by Susman are extended analyses based upon field work with Sam Blowsnake and wife: "The accentual system of Winnebago" and "The Winnebago syllabary." In the "Chiwere (Iowa)" section of the finding aid, Gordon Marsh's "Materials for a study of the Iowa Indian language" include some Ho-Chunk grammatical notes, and Ho-Chunk cognates with Chiwere. Lastly, in the "Dakota" section, Franz Boas' "Miscellaneous Dakota notes" (item X8a.3) includes a Dakota-Ho-Chunk comparative word list.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Ho-Chunk
Alternate forms: Winnebago
Date: 1950
Subject: Music | Medicine | Religion
Genre: Notebooks | Songs
Description: The Ho-Chunk materials in the Lounsbury Papers consists of a large number of recordings of George LaMere singing Buffalo Dance, Medicine, War Party Dance song, etc. The correspondence, in Series I, consists of Winnebago songs by George LaMere including a list of songs and typescript of LaMere's introductory comments listed under Robert E. Ritzenthaler,
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Ho-Chunk
Language(s): Ho-Chunk
Date: 1935-1937
Genre: Songs
Extent: 33 min. : DIGITIZED
Description: The Ho-Chunk materials in the Frank Speck recording collection consist of 14 recordings, primarily of instrumental flute music for various occasions, as well as lullabies, peyote songs, and other medicine songs. (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: Recordings of Cherokee, Creek, Naskapi, Penobscot, Sioux, Santee, Tutelo, and Winnebago (Mss.Rec.49)

Ho-Chunk
Alternate forms: Winnebago
Language(s): English
Date: 1839
Type:Text
Extent: 2 folders
Description: In total, the Kane Family Papers consist of 56 linear feet of letters, legal papers, financial records, etc. of three generations of the prominent Philadelphia family. There are two folders, "Brodhead, D.M. Indian Material," #1 and #2 (1839), in Series II. Kane Family Legal Papers, which contain Philadelphia lawyer Daniel M. Brodhead's handwritten manuscript correspondence and other writings on legal issues pertaining to a recent treaty, treaty rights, land claims, removal, etc. facing the Ho-Chunk (whom he called Winnebago) people in Wisconsin, including a report to Secretary of War Joel R. Poinsett, ad a long letter from Indian agent Joseph M. Street. There is also a letter from C. A. Rogers to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs accusing Brodhead of siphoning treaty money to the comissioners. [See Linda M. Waggoner, "'Neither White Man Nor Indian': Affidavits from the Winnebago Mixed Blood Claim Commissions, Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin," for an interpretation of Brodhead's activities as nefarious).
Collection: Kane Family Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.115)

Ho-Chunk
Language(s): Ho-Chunk | English
Date: undated
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 3 folders
Description: Haas' short file of Ho-Chunk/Winnebago materials consists of a 19-page lexicon with consultants Chief Yellow Thunder and Arthur Decorah, and a card file likely derived from this, organized by Wick R. Miller. This can be found in Series 2 Subseries ‘Ho-Chunk' and Series 9 respectively. There is additionally a discussion of the transfer of Paul Radin's field notes, containing Ho-Chunk materials, to the American Philosophical Society.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Ho-Chunk | Meskwaki
Alternate forms: Winnebago, Fox
Language(s): English
Date: 1962; 1973
Type:Text
Genre: Essays | Notes
Extent: 2 items
Description: Fraenkel's "Notes to accompany Winnebago recording," with informant, date, place, contents, etc., of each tape. Some recordings were made with informant reading from texts published by Paul Radin, Memoirs 2 and 3, International Journal of American Linguistics. See also #3865. Walker's "The Winnebago syllabary and the generative model," regarding the Fox orthography and the derivation of the Winnebago orthography from it; Winnebago rules for conversion from phonemic transcription to the Winnebago orthography.
Collection: Miscellaneous Manuscripts Collection (Mss.Ms.Coll.200)

Ho-Chunk
Alternate forms: Winnebago
Language(s): English | Ho-Chunk
Date: 1908-1930 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 49 items
Description: Materials relating to Radin's study of Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) history, culture, and language. Some items are written in Ho-Chunk, with and without English translations. This large collection includes 34 original field notebooks; numerous short and long stories (Hare cycle, Aleck Linetree [probably Alec Lone Tree], the origin of the Buffalo clan, the story of the holy one, the boy who wished to be immortal, etc.); several longer pieces, such as a typed manuscript titled "The legend of Mother-of-all-the-Earth," speeches of Charlie Houghton, multiple versions of "How Blowsnake joined the medicine dance," "Origin myth of the medicine dance," etc.; several published secondary sources; over 3,000 slips for an English-Winnebago [i.e. Ho-Chunk] dictionary and other items relating to Ho-Chunk phonetics, lexicon, linguistics, etc.; several phonetic texts, some with English translation; and a variety of other items with ethnographic, historical, and linguistic data pertaining to ceremonies, tales, clans, medicine, origins, dance, burial, peyote, names, and sweat-baths. Individuals mentioned (some as ) include: Jacob Russell, Charlie Houghton, Oliver LaMere, Sam Blowsnake, John Rave, Thomas Clay, Robert Lincoln, James Smith, Tom Big Bear, and George Ricehill.
Collection: Paul Radin papers (Mss.497.3.R114)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe | Ho-Chunk
Alternate forms: Winnebago, Ojibwa, Chippewa
Language(s): English | Ojibwe | Ho-Chunk
Date: 1822
Contributor: Kelso, Henry B.
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 1 volume
Description: Ojibwa-English vocabulary, no order. Ho-chunk numerals. Family genealogical data and miscellaneous jottings.
Collection: Indian dictionary, Green Bay (Mss.497.3.K295)