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Abenaki | Innu | Penobscot | Maliseet | Haudenosaunee | Wabanaki | Atikamekw
Alternate forms: Abnaki, Tete de Boule
Date: 1914-1930
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: The Abenaki materials in the Hallowell Papers are mostly located in Series V, Research Files, in folders labled "Abenaki" and Series VI, Photographs, Subseries E "St. Francis Abenaki Album." These include linguistic, ethnographic, ethnobotanical, ceremonial knowledge, information on political organization, and historical materials. Of particular interest are a sketch of Abenaki history from 1600-1930 accompanied by detailed notes from secondary sources on 17th century Abenaki history. The linguistic materials include an analysis of how the language changed after contact with Catholic missionaries, Abenaki vocabulary related to body parts, Abenaki phonetics, and religious, medical, and kinship terminology. The ethnobotanical materials include a manuscript labled "Identity of animals and plants," and information concerning herbal medicine and its practitioners. There is a wealth of ethnographic materials that include drawings of pipes, descriptions of games, baketry and birch bark maks. There is descriptions of Abenaki music and diagrams of dances, as well as detailed descriptions of hunting techniques. Some of the genealogical materials contains lists of community members names and descriptions of marriage. Interspered throughout the folders labled "Abenaki" in the Research Files are interlinear translations of stories such as "Man who could Find Lost Objects," "Woman and Bear Lover" and numerous other stories. The materials on hunting include topics such as the use of snow shoes, preparation of moose hide,and techniques and drawings of trapping. The collections contain important information designation hunting territories and family names. Four folders contain detailed informaiton on kinship terms. Two folders on Measurements and Genealogical data contain lists of names. The folders labled "Linguistics" in Series V contain scattered information about Abenaki grammar. In Series VI, of 160 photographs taken at St. Francis, Odanak in the Centre-du-Québec region. The Abenaki people in the photographs are identified, in most cases, and also include depictions of traditional dress, buildings, clothing, baskets, and a wide variety of material culture. The correspondence, in Series I, includes letters from Theophile Panadis; Gordon Day describing his collection of stories, recordings, vocabularies, and hunting territories. Henry Lorne Masta, one of Hallowell's Abenaki consultants, writes about culture and language. Additional correspondents may contain other Abenaki-related information.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Algonquin | Anishinaabe
Language(s): Algonquin
Date: 1997
Contributor: Artuso, Christian
Extent: 6 audiocassettes (1 hr., 23 min.) : DIGITIZED
Description: Recordings of traditional stories, autobiographical narratives, and conversations given by 11 Algonquin speakers in Kitiganik, Quebec. (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: Algonquin language recordings (Mss.Rec.259)

Atikamekw
Alternate forms: Têtes-de-Boules, Têtes de Boules, Tete de Boule
Language(s): Atikamekw | English
Date: 1915-1931
Extent: 2 folders, 28 photographs
Description: The Atikamekw materials in the Frank G. Speck Papers consist of 2 folders in Subcollection I, Series I. Item II(4B9a) concerns hunting territories of Mistassini, Waswanipi, "Tête de Boule", and Chicoutimi, with ethnographic data on childbirth and chiefs. Item II(2H1) includes notes on Atikamekw consultalts and a word list. Includes notes on reverse of 2p. letter of W. C. Orchard (Heye Foundation) to Speck, Dec. 10, 1931. In Series III, see "10-24(a-z, aa-bb) Tetes de Boule," which contains 28 photographs.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Cree | Innu | Naskapi
Alternate forms: Montagnais, Nehiyaw
Language(s): English | Cree | Innu-aimun
Date: 1911-1931, 1936, 1938-1948
Extent: 6+ folders; 60+ photographs; 1 film
Description: The Cree material in the Frank Speck papers are scattered around multiple sections of the finding aid, mostly in Subcollection I, Series I. In this series, see item II(2A5), containing correspondence from P.G. Downes to Speck regarding Cree in Quebec. See item II(2F3), which includes notes from A. irving Hallowell to Speck regarding field work visiting Sweet Grass Cree, mentioning attitude of Cree to Leonard Bloomfield. Item II(4B9c) contains Speck's field notes on the Mistassini band, including notes on relationship between Cree and Montagnais languages, as well as museum specimens. Item II(2G1) includes Naskapi names in Cree syllabary; the Lord's Prayer in Cree; miscellaneous syllabary Cree words, and images of 79 pictographs. In Subcollection I, Series II, see correspondence with Claude Schaeffer regarding Rocky Boy Cree, and correspondence with Paul A. W. Wallace regarding Cree tales (Wissakutchek) collected by Edward Ahenakew in Alberta. In Subcollection I, Series III, there are 4 "Cree" photograph folders containing approximately 60 photographs. See also "Naskapi films," located in Subcollection II, Series IV, Photographs and Video, which includes some footage of some Cree people.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Language(s): English | French
Date: 1755-1788
Type:Text
Extent: 9 items
Description: Letters between various correspondents regarding Indian affairs. Topics include French intrigues during Seven Years' War era; sale of liquor to Indians and consequent disorders; relations with western Indians and action needed by Congress of Confederation in early national period; ancient fortifications discovered at the junction of Muskingum and Ohio, as well as in Kentucky; South Carolina governor's bad management of Indian affairs; discovery of root which cures gout; land sales and grants; Indians' title to lands, implications of papal decrees and Quebec Act.
Collection: Benjamin Franklin Papers (Mss.B.F85)

Innu | Naskapi
Alternate forms: Montagnais
Language(s): French | Innu-aimun
Date: 1953
Type:Text
Extent: 4 pages
Description: Lists of Montagnais names of birds, fishes and amphibians, and mammals. Based on French-speaking informants, Sebastian McKenzie and his son Francis, Scotch-Montagnais descent. Orthography is French, not phonetic. Secured during Ungava expedition of the Arctic Institute of North America.
Collection: Miscellaneous Manuscripts Collection (Mss.Ms.Coll.200)

Innu | Naskapi
Alternate forms: Montagnais
Language(s): English
Date: 1919
Extent: 30+ photographs
Description: The Innu materials in the Hallowell Papers include 30+ photographs in Series VI, Subseries D, from Lac St-Jean (Mashteuiatsh) and unidentified Naskapi communities.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Innu | Naskapi
Alternate forms: Montagnais, Montagnais-Naskapi
Language(s): English | Innu-aimun | Naskapi
Date: 1910s-1940s
Extent: 1.5 linear feet; 500+ photographs; 10+ maps; 1 film
Description: The Innu and Naskapi materials in the Frank Speck Papers are extensive and found to some degree in most sectionsn of the finding aid. The majority of these materials are identified by Speck as "Montagnais-Naskapi," though they include materials relating to Innu peoples from throughout Québec and Labrador, particularly the communities in the area of Lac St-Jean (Mashteuiatsh; usually given as "Lake St. John" by Speck), St-Augustin (usually "St. Augustine" in Speck); and Naskapi communities in northern and central Labrador. The main body of field work manuscript material is found in Subcollection I, Series II, especially items II(3B1a) through II(4B13). In Series III and IV, there are approximately 500-600 photographs and lantern slides from these communities. Series V contains approximately 12 maps pertaining to Speck's research into hunting territories and place names. In Subcollection II, Series I, see correspondence from Beston, Cooper, Gusinde, Myers, Sapir, and especially the voluminous correspondence with Richard White, a trader in Labrador who provided Speck with extensive information on the Naskapi peoples of the region for decades. In Series II, there are numerous works by Speck, including draft versions of "Naskapi, the Savage Hunters of the Labrador Peninsula." Finally, in Series IV, there is a brief silent film consisting of footage taken of various Innu peoples, including Joseph Kurtness, doing various activities, such as skinning and preparing hides, and singing.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Cayuga | Cherokee | Haudenosaunee | Mohawk | Nanticoke | Oneida | Onondaga | Seneca | Tuscarora | Wyandot
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Wendat, Huron
Language(s): English | Mohawk
Date: 1900-1951
Type:Text
Extent: 1380 pages
Description: This manuscript is an alphabetical list of about 6200 Iroquoian names, collected over 5 decades by Charles Cooke (Thawennensere), a Mohawk scholar from Wahta. Each entry includes the name in its Mohawk rendering, with phonetic spelling, gender, tribe, location, date, and clan. The name is then analyzed by radicals, with historical information about its bearer (where relevant). Cross reference to variants and from English names of Indians. Preface by Cooke, edited by C. Marius Barbeau, classifies names and gives numbers and sex. This item has been fully digitized and can be viewed online. See also an accompanying audio collection (Mss.Rec.10), listed separately in this guide, in which Cooke reads the majority of the names.
Collection: Iroquois personal names (Mss.497.3.C772)

Cree
Alternate forms: James Bay Cree, Nehiyaw
Language(s): English
Date: 1986
Type:Text
Extent: 1 folder
Description: The James Bay Cree materials in the Fenton papers can be found in Series I, correspondence with the Grand Council of the Crees.
Collection: William N. Fenton papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.20)