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Aztec
Language(s): English
Date: 1790-1806, 1818
Type:Text
Extent: 1 volume, 106 p.
Description: William E. Hulings' translation of Leon y Gama's "Descripcion Histórica y Cronológica de las dos Piedras" (1792), together with a query of William E. Hulings on the possible relation of the Aztecs to the Mound Builders. The volume describes and translates a monument and a calendar stone; it also presents ethnologic information, particularly regarding mythology. The volume is divided into three sections with separate pagination: "An historical and chronological description of two stones found under ground, in the great square of the City of Mexico, in the years 1790" (84 p.), "Notes to Antonio de Leon y Gama's Work" (19 p.), and "Translated from the Diary of Mexico, for Augt. 5th 1806" (3 p.).
Collection: An historical and chronological description of two stones found under ground, in the great square of the City of Mexico, in the years 1790 [translation] (Mss.913.72.L55)

Caddo | Delaware | Choctaw | Chickasaw | Osage | Pascagoula | Natchez
Language(s): English
Date: 1804
Type:Text
Extent: 107 pages
Description: "Journal up the Red and Washita rivers, with William Dunbar, by order of the U.S. with list of common names of some of the trees and vegetables from the River Washita." No. 2 of Explorations in the Louisiana Country. Describes mounds near Natchez and on the Ouachita. Mentions Caddo trace; Captain Jacobs, a Delaware Indian; Chickasaws, Choctaws, Osages (Little Osages and Grand Osages) and Pascagoulas; warfare and raids; and the singing of a Choctaw woman mourning a child. Printed (abstract only) as Jefferson (1806). [See also Hunter journals #473, volumes 2, 3, 4, May 27, 1804-March 29, 1805.]
Collection: Mémoire sur le district du Ouachita dans la province de la Louisianne, [1803] (Mss.917.6.Ex7)

Chickasaw | Cherokee | Choctaw
Language(s): English
Date: March 24, 1837
Type:Text
Extent: 1 page
Description: Letter discussing grave robbing of Indigenous ancestors' remains. Sends drawings of heads, one of an ancient tribe, flattened at back of head, from mound at junction of French-Broad and Holston rivers. Other from bank of Cumberland river above Nashville, probably of Chickasaw, Cherokee, and Choctaw nations said to visit here. They seem much alike in their living form to Troost.
Collection: Samuel George Morton Papers (Mss.B.M843)

Chinook | Guanche | Klickitat
Language(s): English
Date: 1835; 1837
Type:Text
Extent: 2 items
Description: Letters discussing grave robbing of Indigenous ancestors' remains. Letter from John Warren Collins including a list of American Indian skulls in his collection: Chinook, Mound Builder, and Algonquian. Has cast of Guanche skull from Canary Islands. Letter from John Kirk Townsend regarding a trunk full of remains he sent, including a few skulls, one of which is Klickitat; explains that with many falling to disease it is easier to take remains. In a postscript, he describes at length the manner of compressing the skull. Emphasizes that while some normal heads are seen, those individuals never attain any power or influence. His Chinook specimen was that of a chief.
Collection: Samuel George Morton Papers (Mss.B.M843)

Language(s): English
Date: 1940-1945
Extent: .1 linear feet
Description: This collection of memorabilia includes clippings, postcards (one from Marion H. Dickson), a brochure, and an arrow-head (a gift from the site to Murphy D. Smith, who deposited these materials at the APS). Images from a 1945 article in the Peoria Morning Star on the establishment of the new historical state park at the site include several striking photos of an excavated burial site (described as containing 230 skeletons of Mound-builders who died in a devastating epidemic), including one with of a school group at the burial site and another highlighting Dr. Don F. Dickson's method of leaving the dead in situ; a photo of the Dickson family farmstead (on which the Dickson mounds were located) before the establishment of the state park; and a photo of reconstructed pottery displayed in the museum. There is also a brochure about the site as a tourist and educational attraction with information on the history of the mounts, the Dickson Mound Museum, the work of the Dickson family (primarily Dr. Don F. Dickson, Marion H. Dickson, and Thomas M. Dickson), and the neighboring Payne Collection of artifacts. Several images of the excavated mass burial indicate that it was expected to be the main attraction to visitors, and it is called the "greatest display of stone age man in the world...230 skeletons left in original positions." Views of the burial site are also featured on the two postcards. The Dickson Mounds Museum is still a branch of the Illinois State Museum, and the Dickson Mounds are now understood to be a Mississippian cemetery complex associated with nearby village sites and a ceremonial center.
Collection: Dickson Mound (Lewistown, Ill.) Memorabilia (Mss.970.6.D56)

Language(s): English
Date: 1931-1941
Contributor: Schoff, Harry L.
Genre:
Extent: 2 items
Description: Materials relating to archaeological sites in New York State. Includes Schoff's reports and photographs on Wheatland Mound, Kip Island site, and Eagle Bluff site, all in Seneca County, New York, and regarded as Point Peninsula aspect, an undated letter from Schoff to Edmund S. Carpenter, and an unattributed item titled "Vandalia Mound Materials," a report on a Hopewellian site in Cattaraugus County, New York, along with a site map and two photographs.
Collection: United States. Work Projects Administration (Pa.) Reports, 1918-1948 (Mss.913.748.Un3)

Chickasaw | Choctaw | Catawba | Tutelo | Natchez | Caddo | Delaware | Sauk | Meskwaki | Tunica | Beothuk | Montauk | Seminole | Cherokee | Yuchi | Creek
Alternate forms: Fox
Language(s): English
Date: 1915-1950
Type:Text
Extent: 18 folders
Description: This entry concerns materials relating to Speck's general study of Native American peoples, languages, and cultures east of the Mississippi, as well as to his activities as a consulted expert in the field. Includes Speck's miscellaneous notes on the southeast; notes on "tribal remnants" in the southeast; notes on shamanism in the northeast; notes on the 1941 symposium Man in Northeastern America; offprints, drafts, and synopses of the work of others, sometimes with Speck's notes, including several that were printed in Frederick Johnson's 1946 volume based on the symposium, Man in Northeastern North America; archaeological reports on southeastern pottery, mound sites, and the Georgia coast; a student's master's thesis on mound-builders; and letters from various correspondents regarding eastern Indian baskets, museum specimens, the sale of Indian art and specimens, the ethnohistory of the southeast, Indian place names, archaeological sites in Pennsylvania and Massachusetts, scapulimancy, copies of Indian treaties from a museum in Nova Scotia, and other topics.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Language(s): English | French
Date: 1755-1788
Type:Text
Extent: 9 items
Description: Letters between various correspondents regarding Indian affairs. Topics include French intrigues during Seven Years' War era; sale of liquor to Indians and consequent disorders; relations with western Indians and action needed by Congress of Confederation in early national period; ancient fortifications discovered at the junction of Muskingum and Ohio, as well as in Kentucky; South Carolina governor's bad management of Indian affairs; discovery of root which cures gout; land sales and grants; Indians' title to lands, implications of papal decrees and Quebec Act.
Collection: Benjamin Franklin Papers (Mss.B.F85)

Language(s): English
Date: 1811-1884
Type:Text
Extent: 4 items
Description: 1) Moses Fiske's description of skeletal remains found in basket burial in Warren County, Tennessee, in 1810. 2) Charles Willson Peale's catalogue of museum contents: "Indian curiosities, dresses, ornaments. Implements of agriculture, war, etc. of various nations. In the upper Room." Artifacts and articles of dress of western Indians (Lewis and Clark); ornaments from Ohio mounds; unidentified belts, pouches, and arrowheads. 3) Benjamin Franklin Peale's description of his collection of Material culture; thinks pottery fragments sent to him by Sellers are those of Mound Builders. 4) George Escol Seller's letter describing his artifacts from mounds in Ohio, 60 specimens of tools and cloth. Argues that Franklin Peale collected specimens to show the unity of mankind, while Sellers collects to find the variety of tools. Discusses Mound Builders at some length.
Collection: Peale-Sellers Family Collection (Mss.B.P31)

Choctaw | Creek | Yuchi | Cherokee | Chickasaw | Atakapa | Natchez | Chinook
Language(s): English
Date: 1829-1839
Type:Text
Extent: 21 items
Description: Letters mostly discussing grave robbing of Indigenous ancestors' remains and Morton's phrenological work. Topics include human and animal crania and skeletons that correspondents have and/or have sent to Morton; phrenological anaylsis of Indigenous ancestors' remains, attributing traits to various peoples based on skull formation; Native American burial sites and mortuary customs; excavation of Native mounds and descriptions of the objects and human remains found inside; discovery of mastadon skeletons; and speculation about Native American origins. Several letters relate to Ohio, Illinois, and the Upper Mississippi Valley. Peru and Mexico also mentioned.
Collection: Samuel George Morton Papers (Mss.B.M843)