Current Filters
Click filter to remove
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4
Language(s): English
Date: 1950-1953
Type:Text
Extent: 3 items
Description: The Deering Collection of Indian Captivities is comprised of a bibliography, together with ethnographic and historical summaries and extracts, of the collection of Indian captivities of the late Frank Cutter Deering of Saco, Maine, in the keeping of Joseph G. Deering of Biddeford, Maine, prepared under grants from the Wenner-Gren Foundation and the American Philosophical Society. Pages 1-1037 describe the books of Deering; works in the libraries of Harvard, Yale, Laval, the National Museum of Canada, the Collection de Luc Lacourciere, Quebec, and McGill University. Transcriptions and extracts from manuscripts by Frank C. Deering, captivities of Mary Storer (compiled by Jacques Rousseau, 1942), 1703, with letters; Nathaniel Segar, manuscript in the Seminaire de Quebec, Toronto Public Library; and of Edmund S. Carpenter. Summaries, too, of standard printed series, such as Thwaites, etc. Relates to northeastern, plains, western, and Canadian Indians in particular. Omitted are those 40 works found in the Greenwood collection. An important set of summaries because of the inaccessibility of the collection. Reference to both the Walsh and the Ayer lists. [N.B., duplicate numbering, 1351-1362, of different material.] This collection also includes a brief catalogue prepared by Michael J. Walsh of Goodspeed's, Boston, at death of Frank C. Deering, which includes texts omitted in the longer bibliography, as well as a corrected corrected version of Walsh's catalogue by Charles Marius Barbeau, 1950.
Collection: Indian narratives and captivities (Mss.016.9701.D365b)

Language(s): English
Date: 1811-1884
Type:Text
Extent: 4 items
Description: 1) Moses Fiske's description of skeletal remains found in basket burial in Warren County, Tennessee, in 1810. 2) Charles Willson Peale's catalogue of museum contents: "Indian curiosities, dresses, ornaments. Implements of agriculture, war, etc. of various nations. In the upper Room." Artifacts and articles of dress of western Indians (Lewis and Clark); ornaments from Ohio mounds; unidentified belts, pouches, and arrowheads. 3) Benjamin Franklin Peale's description of his collection of Material culture; thinks pottery fragments sent to him by Sellers are those of Mound Builders. 4) George Escol Seller's letter describing his artifacts from mounds in Ohio, 60 specimens of tools and cloth. Argues that Franklin Peale collected specimens to show the unity of mankind, while Sellers collects to find the variety of tools. Discusses Mound Builders at some length.
Collection: Peale-Sellers Family Collection (Mss.B.P31)

Language(s): English
Date: 1987
Type:Text
Genre: Catalogs
Extent: 1 volume, 34 p.
Description: Inventory of collections in the Archives of the Languages of the World at Indiana University.
Collection: Indiana University. Archives of Traditional Music (Mss.016.4.In2)

Onondaga | Haudenosaunee | Lenape | Creek
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Lenape
Language(s): English | French
Date: 1798-1897
Type:Text
Extent: 34 items
Description: Items relating to linguists and languages of the Americas. Bulk is the correspondence of Peter S. du Ponceau with Thomas Jefferson, Friedrich von Adelung, John Quincy Adams, John Vaughan, Johann S. Vater, John G. E. Heckewelder, Albert Gallatin, George Ord, and others regarding topics such as linguistics; Native languages and customs; acquiring publications for the American Philosophical Society Library; forwarding publications to others; philological essays; legal essays; Europeans' study of American Indian languages; the efforts of the Historical and Literary Committee and its pursuit of languages, especially comparative grammars; his own collection of Vocabularies; his work as an editor and linguist, including his addition to Barton (1797); Long's expedition and western vocabularies now in print; the origin of the American Indian; Byrd's manuscript of the North Carolina-Virginia boundary; the importance of comparative grammars instead of mere word-hunting; the Lewis and Clark journals; his search for Southern languages; Adelung's comment that Jefferson knew of a Mexican manuscript at New Orleans, and that Washington and others had supplied vocabularies to Catherine the Great; and plans for William Penn papers. Other items of interest include APS reports, including "Catalogue of historical manuscripts in the American Philosophical Society," Du Ponceau's "Report upon philology...and Report upon ethnography," and a letter to Mahlon Dickerson discussing objectives and scientific methods to be used on U. S. exploring expedition.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)