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Dakota | Meskwaki | Iowa
Alternate forms: Sioux, Sac and Fox
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1955-1958
Extent: 22 folders
Description: The Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers are a vast collection of materials relating to Wallace's work at the intersection of anthropology, psychology, and history. See the finding aid for a detailed discussion of Wallace's long and varied career, and for an itemized list of the collection's contents. Though further research might yield more results, approximately 22 items directly relating to Dakota peoples (also called Sioux by Wallace) have been identifed. All of these materials relate to land claims by the Sisseton-Wahpeton, Mdewakanton, and Wapakoota Sioux, with whom the Yankton Sioux consolidated their claim in 1958, based on the 1851 treaty line in Minnesota. Materials include research and writings by Wallace and by his assistant Michal Kane and Wallace's correspondence with the legal representatives of the Dakota claimants. There are some relevant materials in Series I. Correspondence filed under New Directions, Seymour Parker, Pauline Shortridge, and John Wozniak. However, most of these folders reside in the alphabetically-organized Seriex IX. Indian Claims, and are as follows: "Dakota Indians--Notes," "Dakota Indians--Wallace, Anthony F.C.-- Eastern Dakota: Outline of Locations, Population, Culture and History, 1800-1862" (1957), "Kane, Michal--Dakota (Eastern Dakota): Notes," "Kane, Michal--Safi-Sioux Conflict: Notes and Explanation for Map," "Kane, Michal--Sioux Claims: Calendar of Selections from Senate and House Documents," "Kane, Michal--Sioux's Eye View of Minnesota History," "Marest, Gabriel, 1662-1714--Letter in Neill, N.D., History of Minnesota (extract)," "Miscellaneous Manuscript Collections--Historical Societies--Minnesota," "Sioux--Correspondence," Sioux--Correspondence: Cragun, John W.," "Siouan Indians--Correspondence: Sonosky, Marvin (Finances)," "Sioux Exhibits--Exhibits: Sac and Fox Cases, Bureau of Indian Affairs," "Sioux--Maps," "Sioux--Notes by AFCW #1," "Sioux--Notes by AFCW #2," "Sioux--Sisseton and Wahpeton Bands or Tribes, etc. et. al. vs. the United States of America, Docket Nos. 142, 359-363: Proposed Findings of Fact and Brief in Support Thereof, in Behalf of Mississippi Sioux, Petitioners" (2 folders, volume 1 and 2), and "Sioux--Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958 Early History of Eastern Siouan Tribes (notes)." Note that much of Wallace's Dakota (Sioux) material incorporated his earlier research on the Meskwaki (Sac and Fox) and other neighboring peoples, and there is a great deal of overlap among these entries.
Collection: Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.64a)

Language(s): English
Date: 1940-1945
Extent: .1 linear feet
Description: This collection of memorabilia includes clippings, postcards (one from Marion H. Dickson), a brochure, and an arrow-head (a gift from the site to Murphy D. Smith, who deposited these materials at the APS). Images from a 1945 article in the Peoria Morning Star on the establishment of the new historical state park at the site include several striking photos of an excavated burial site (described as containing 230 skeletons of Mound-builders who died in a devastating epidemic), including one with of a school group at the burial site and another highlighting Dr. Don F. Dickson's method of leaving the dead in situ; a photo of the Dickson family farmstead (on which the Dickson mounds were located) before the establishment of the state park; and a photo of reconstructed pottery displayed in the museum. There is also a brochure about the site as a tourist and educational attraction with information on the history of the mounts, the Dickson Mound Museum, the work of the Dickson family (primarily Dr. Don F. Dickson, Marion H. Dickson, and Thomas M. Dickson), and the neighboring Payne Collection of artifacts. Several images of the excavated mass burial indicate that it was expected to be the main attraction to visitors, and it is called the "greatest display of stone age man in the world...230 skeletons left in original positions." Views of the burial site are also featured on the two postcards. The Dickson Mounds Museum is still a branch of the Illinois State Museum, and the Dickson Mounds are now understood to be a Mississippian cemetery complex associated with nearby village sites and a ceremonial center.
Collection: Dickson Mound (Lewistown, Ill.) Memorabilia (Mss.970.6.D56)

Atikamekw | Dene | Hopi | Makah | Inca | Yurok | Hupa | Yuki | Maidu | Miwok | Cahuilla | Mojave | Pomo | Chukchi | Kwakwaka'wakw | Nuu-chah-nulth | Salish | Maya | Ktunaxa | Arawak
Alternate forms: Athabaskan, Athapascan, TĂȘtes-de-Boules, TĂȘtes de Boules, Tete de Boule, Hoopa, Mohave, Kwakiutl, Nootka, Kutenai, Kootenai, Kootenay, Na:tini-xwe
Language(s): English
Date: 1920-1958
Type:Text
Description: Materials from a wide range of indigenous cultures around the world are scattered throughout Series V of the A. Irving Hallowell Papers. Hallowell was interested in comparative ethnology on a number of topics including Bear Ceremonialism, textiles, artistic representations of Native people, basketry, kinship, pre-history, the development of language, family and marriage, nets and netting, etc. Much of this material constitutes Hallowell's reading notes on secondary sources and his research for very broad-based studies of humanity. Geographic regions represented in Series V include Australia, Africa, Pacific Islands, Polar regions California, Northwest coast, Southwest, and Southeast. The correspondence, in Series I, includes a very interesting, brief description of Franz Boas' first visit to the Kwakwaka'wakw community of Fort Rupert by the daughter of George Hunt in a folder labled Ronald Rohmer. There is also a letter from Edward Sapir detailing Nuu-chah-nulth bear hunting and face painting as well as sketches of netting needles.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)