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Anishinaabe | Blackfoot | Cree | Dakota | Métis | Kainai | Nakoda | Ojibwe | Secwépemc
Alternate forms: Blood, Ojibwa, Saulteaux, Shuswap, Simpcw, Sioux, Stoney
Language(s): English
Date: 1905-1910
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: Norman Leonard Jacobs was an engineer and surveyor with the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway in Canada. The collection consists of his correspondence with Bessie Frank (later Anathan), an acquaintance from Pittsburgh. Jacobs wrote of daily life in Canadian cities like Winnipeg and Edmonton, interactions with First Nations, and daily hardships encountered in the field (extreme cold, snowblindness, and lack of food), but also spoke of his work with pride and enthusiasm. In addition to the letters, Jacobs wrote twenty-eight pages of a "Diary of a Tenderfoot." Also included in the collection are two photobooks and various loose photographs, which display various aspects of camp life, details of work sites and the Canadian landscape, and First Nations peoples. Some of the photographs are extremely faded. Native peoples mentioned include Ojibwe, Blackfoot, Cree, "Surteau" (likely Saulteaux),"Bloods" (Kainai), "Stonies" (Nakoda, or "Stoney"), as well as Native people at Tete Jaune Cache who are likely Simpcw. The images include family groups; men, women, and children fishing; men (some apparently hired by Jacobs or his company to act as guides and carriers in the field) working with an infant in a cradleboard; Ojibwe graves; tepees [tipis]; "Sioux" warriors; a sweat bath; horse races; individuals like Joe KaeKwitch, Chief Handorgan, Chief Wingard, Muskowken, etc. Most of these materials have been digitized and are available through the APS's Digital Library. Also see the finding aid for more background information on Jacobs and detailed itemized lists for both Series I. Correspondence and Series II. Graphic Materials.
Collection: Anathan-Jacobs Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Collection (Mss.SMs.Coll.13)

Cayuga | Seneca-Cayuga | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1795, 1949, and undated
Extent: 3 folders
Description: The Cayuga materials in the Snyderman Papers include correspondence from Alexander General (Deskaheh) in Series I concerning "Cayuga Legends Explaining Conquest of Huronia," and a map of the Cayuga reservation from 1795 in Series II and a "Preliminary Report of the Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma" manuscript in Series IV.
Collection: George S. Snyderman Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.51)

Cayuga | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1917, 1934-1989
Type:Text
Extent: .5 linear feet
Description: The Cayuga materials in the William Fenton Papers can be found in multiple sections of the finding aid. In Series I, see correspondence with "General, Chief and Mrs. Alex." Additional information may be included in other correspondences. In Series IIb, see especially "A Cayuga League Tradition." Series III includes the manuscripts "Howard Sky, 1900-1971: Cayuga Faith-Keeper, Gentleman, and Interpreter of Iroquois Culture" and "Installing a Cayuga Chief in 1945." Series IV includes Kurath's diary "Report on Cayuga Soursprings Longhouse Midwinter Festival." Series V includes Fenton's notes on "Deskaheh on Cayuga Council." In Series VI, there are photos of "Cayuga nomination strings" In Series VIII-B, see the "Iroquois Social Structure" section and in Series VIII-D see the "Cayuga Social Organization" folder with information on Myron Turkey. Additional Cayuga-related materials may be found in other folders not currently identified as Cayuga.
Collection: William N. Fenton papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.20)

Cree
Language(s): Cree | Cree, Southern East
Date: 1969
Type:Text
Extent: ca. 152 p.
Description: The only Cree materials in the Charles E. Fiero Papers are "A Report on Coastal Montagnais-Naskapi by Helen Hisey and Charles Fiero" in Series I, with possibly similar materials on CD in Series II. Despite being titled "Coastal Montagnais-Naskapi", this is likely Southern East Cree, as the consultants are residents of Eastmain and Moose Factory, on James Bay. Fieldwork was done at Mokahum Indian Bible School, Cass Lake, Minnesota, where Fiero was working. The material includes grammatical analysis, interlinear texts, and lexica.
Collection: Charles E. Fiero Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.187)

Haudenosaunee | Mohawk | Seneca | Tuscarora | Lenape | Oneida
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Lenape
Language(s): English
Date: 1936-1967
Extent: 39 items
Description: Materials relating to Paul A. W. Wallace's interest in Haudenosaunee people, history, and culture. Of particular interest will be Wallace's correspondence and interviews with Haudenosaunee individuals. This includes Wallace's extensive correspondence with Ray Fadden (Tehanetorens, Aren Akweks) on subjects such as publications, the Six Nations, the Akwesasne Mohawks, personal matters, etc., as well as a woodcut by John Fadden (Kahionhes) titled "The persecuted Iroquois"; Ray Fadden's "The Visions of Handsome Lake," an interpretation of Ray Fadden's wampum belt (with two drawings by John Fadden); and Ray Fadden's (Aren Akweks, Tehanetorens) "Iroquois Lesson Book-Stories for good children and bad." Interview materials include a Six Nations Journal, containing notes on interviews with Nick Peters, Chief Joseph Montour, John Napoleon Brinton Hewitt, Isaiah Williams, Chief Hess, Chief William Loft, Alec General, and Jerry Aaron; notes, manuscripts, and interviews with William Dewaseragech Loft relating to the Six Nations and to Wallace's preparation of an entry on Loft for the Dictionary of Canadian Biography; and a transcript of a talk on Haudenosaunee cosmogony and history of relations with white people attributed to the Seneca chief Cornplanter and taken from a document (circa 1822) in the Draper Collection at Princeton University. Other Native correspondents and consultants include Jesse J. Cornplanter regarding the purchase of drawings, along with five of Cornplanter's drawings: "Two Friends," "Mortise," and three untitled; Alexander J. General (Deskaheh) regarding copies of Wallace's White Roots of Peace, the identity of a Mohawk chief, the meaning of some names, and Wallace's trip for the Seventh Annual Pageant at Ohnedagowah; E. T. Montour regarding the Handsome Lake religion; Ethel Brant Montour regarding the Six Nations and the Brant and Montour families; Donald Richmond regarding copying the Seth Newhouse version of Deganawidah sent to the St. Regis Mohawks; Allan Wargon regarding the film "The Longhouse People"; M. J. Jamieson regarding attendance by Wallace at the Condolence to the Dead and the Great Feast for the Dead; Arthur Einhorn (Skaroniate) regarding copies of publications, misinformation about the Iroquois, and plans for building an "Indian village"; Emily General regarding possible genealogical studies of chiefs of the Six Nations, the annual pageant at Ohnedagowah, and vital statistics of Deskaheh (Hi-wyi-iss, Levi General); Bernice Minton Loft Winslow (Dawendine) regarding the Six Nations, the health of her father Chief William Loft (Mohawk), publications, her poetry; Mad Bear regarding a parcel of land in Philadelphia reportedly owned by the and Robert Gabor (Sagotaoala) regarding Gabor's interest in and research on the effects of the adoption complex on the Iroquois Confederacy, his art work for Ray Fadden, circumstances under which the Delawares entered the League, etc. There is also correspondence between Wallace and other non-Native researchers including Charles E. Congdon regarding arrangements for conferences on Iroquoian studies; James T. Edward regarding a biographical sketch of Madam Montour for Notable American Women, 1607-1950; Peter Schuyler Miller regarding the Deganawidah legend; Arthur Caswell Parker regarding the Six Nations and Conrad Weiser; Harvey Chalmers regarding Heckewelder's prejudice against the Six Nations and its effect on Cooper, and prejudice aroused by Cooper's novels; Howard F. Comrie regarding the Iroquois Confederacy as an inspiration for the Constitution and Bill of Rights; Harry C. Durston regarding the date and place of the founding of the Five Nations Confederacy and possible influences of the Six Nations on the United States Constitution; John F. Freeman regarding Ray Fadden and the Akwesasne Mohawk Counsellor Organization and mentioning Seth Newhouse, Bernice Loft, and Edward Ahenakew; Marion E. Gridley regarding The Amerindian: American Indian Review, a picture of Maria Tallchief, and role of the Delawares, Tuscaroras, and Oneidas in the American Revolution; Alfred K. Guthe regarding old photos of Iroquois costumes in the Rochester Museum of Arts and Sciences; John Serres regarding the dedication of an Iroquois monument at Scarboro, Ontario and attempts to preserve Native culture; William N. Fenton regarding the Six Nations, different versions of the Deganawidah legend, meanings of Indian names, archaeological work in the area to be flooded by the Kinzua Dam, political history of the Iroquois, Seth Newhouse, publications, research, fieldwork, etc.; an essay by Fenton on published and manuscript sources relating to the history of political institutions and laws of the Six Nations, particularly with regard to ethnological sources, procedural methods to reach the desired goal, and expected results (published in Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society 93 (1949): pages 233-238); and William A. Ritchie regarding a meeting at the American Philosophical Society, Indian trails in the Delaware Valley, and the probable date of the founding of the Five Nations Confederacy. Finally, there are Wallace's own notes, drafts, essays, etc., including notes for and a draft of "The Iroquois-A Brief Outline of their History" and "Return of Hiawatha," on the reasons for Iroquois ascendancy.
Collection: Paul A. W. Wallace Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.64b)

Cayuga | Cherokee | Haudenosaunee | Mohawk | Nanticoke | Oneida | Onondaga | Seneca | Tuscarora | Wyandot
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Wendat, Huron
Language(s): English | Mohawk
Date: 1900-1951
Type:Text
Extent: 1380 pages
Description: This manuscript is an alphabetical list of about 6200 Iroquoian names, collected over 5 decades by Charles Cooke (Thawennensere), a Mohawk scholar from Wahta. Each entry includes the name in its Mohawk rendering, with phonetic spelling, gender, tribe, location, date, and clan. The name is then analyzed by radicals, with historical information about its bearer (where relevant). Cross reference to variants and from English names of Indians. Preface by Cooke, edited by C. Marius Barbeau, classifies names and gives numbers and sex. This item has been fully digitized and can be viewed online. See also an accompanying audio collection (Mss.Rec.10), listed separately in this guide, in which Cooke reads the majority of the names.
Collection: Iroquois personal names (Mss.497.3.C772)

Anishinaabe | Cayuse | Klallam | Cree | Dakelh | Haida | Heiltsuk | Kalapuya | Klickitat | Ktunaxa | Nez Perce | Nisga'a | Nuxalk | Ojibwe | Secwépemc | Squamish | Syilx | Tlingit | Walla Walla
Alternate forms: Bella Bella, Bella Coola, Carrier, Haíɫzaqv, Kootenai, Kootenay, Kutenai, Nehiyaw, Okanagan, Okanagon, Saulteaux, Shuswap, Skwxwú7mesh, Clallam, S'Klallam, nəxʷsƛ̕ay̕əm, Niska, Nishga, Nisgha
Date: 1834-1836
Type:Text
Genre: Notebooks
Extent: 2 volumes
Description: This collection contains two manuscript volumes collected by the naturalist John Kirk Townsend, obtained by dictation from native speakers, people of mixed ancestry, and traders of the Hudson's Bay Company. The first volume contains a collection of multiple comparative vocabulary lists of languages of modern-day Washington, Idaho, Oregon, British Columbia, and Alaska, obtained by dictation from native speakers, people of mixed ancestry, and traders of the Hudson's Bay Company. Languages included are: "Okanagan" (N̓səl̓xcin), "Attnaha" or "Shoushwap" (Secwepemctsin), "Walla Walla (Sahaptin), "Squalyamish" (Squamish / Sḵwx̱wú7mesh ?), "Nooselalum" (Klallam / nəxʷsƛ̕ay̕əm), "Haeeltzuk" (Heiltsuk), "Billichoola" (Nuxalk), "Nass" (Nisga'a), "Haidah" (Haida), "Tongaase" (Tlingit, possibly inland variety), Nez Perce, Chinook [Jargon], "Carrier or Takelhé" (Dakelh), "Kayouse" (Cayuse), and "Kootenai" (Ktunaxa). The second volume is a collection of vocabulary lists of 19 Indigenous languages, primarily of the Pacific Northwest, re-copied from earlier notes in an orderly fashion with an index and additional introductory information on the area where each language is spoken and the source of the vocabulary. 15 of the vocabularies are re-copied out from the first volume in this collection. This volume includes the languages listed for that volume, plus Cree (possibly Plains Cree), "Kalapooyah" (Kalapuya), Klikatat (Sahaptin or Yakama), and "Seauteux" (Western Ojibwa/Ojibwe).
Collection: John Kirk Townsend Indian vocabularies collection (Mss.497.3.T66)

Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Chippewa
Language(s): English | Ojibwe
Date: undated
Extent: ca 250 pages, 42 photographs
Description: "Ethnographic and linguistic field notes on the Ojibwa Indians," some 250 pages and 42 photographs regarding government, mythology, festivals, customs, games, etc. Also includes comments on the vocabulary, some items with English glosses; lists of bands and locations; photographs of people, activities, dwellings, canoes, etc.
Collection: Ojibwa ethnographic and linguistic field notes, 1903-1905 (Mss.497.3.J71)

Ojibwe | Anishinaabe
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Ojibway, Oji-Cree
Date: 1957-2017
Extent: 2.75 linear feet
Description: Almost all of the Charles E. Fiero Papers reflect varieties of Ojibwe/Anishinaabemowin. Fiero, a missionary linguist, is best known within the field for creating the double-vowel orthography. Series I (the bulk) contains manuscripts, while Series II contains a small volume of digital media that has yet to be transferred. The collection represents fieldwork originally done between 1957 and 1993 (bulk 1957-1970s), chronologically arranged by date of first fieldwork, and contains many retranscriptions and reanalyses by Fiero from subsequent decades, illustrating his understanding of the material. The fieldnotes mostly comprise lexica and texts, and individual folders typically contain detailed background information. Fieldwork was mostly conducted in Ontario. Place names include: Berens River, Deer Lake, Pauingassi, Pikangikum, Poplar Hill, Red Lake, White Earth, Cat Lake, Doghole Bar, Fort Hope, Grassy Narrows, McDowell Lake, North Spirit Lake, and Pickle Lake.
Collection: Charles E. Fiero Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.187)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Chippewa, Ojibwa, Ojibway, Saulteaux
Date: 1955-2011 (bulk 1992-2011)
Extent: 350+ hours; 2500+ photographs; 100+ documents
Description: Audio recordings, photographs, and born-digital manuscripts documenting Ojibwe communities and individuals primarily in Manitoba and Ontario, with a smaller number from Minnesota and Wisconsin. Subject matter includes the photographs and ethnography of A. Irving Hallowell in these communities in the 1930s, thunderbirds, memegwesiwag, Ojibwe language, religion, ceremonies, and other traditions. The main communities concerned are Berens River, Pauingassi, Little Grand Rapids, Pikangikum, Poplar Hill, and Jackhead. The majority of the audio materials are interviews recorded in the context of producing radio documentaries for CBC Radio One from the early 1990s through late 2000s. (See Series I, Subseries 12 for the broadcast version of these documentaries.) Transcripts for both the finished documentaries and some of the interviews are located in Series II. Photographs taken during Matthews' visits to indigenous communities, museums, and other locations can be found in Series III.
Collection: Maureen Matthews Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.164)