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Cayuga | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1917, 1934-1989
Type:Text
Extent: .5 linear feet
Description: The Cayuga materials in the William Fenton Papers can be found in multiple sections of the finding aid. In Series I, see correspondence with "General, Chief and Mrs. Alex." Additional information may be included in other correspondences. In Series IIb, see especially "A Cayuga League Tradition." Series III includes the manuscripts "Howard Sky, 1900-1971: Cayuga Faith-Keeper, Gentleman, and Interpreter of Iroquois Culture" and "Installing a Cayuga Chief in 1945." Series IV includes Kurath's diary "Report on Cayuga Soursprings Longhouse Midwinter Festival." Series V includes Fenton's notes on "Deskaheh on Cayuga Council." In Series VI, there are photos of "Cayuga nomination strings" In Series VIII-B, see the "Iroquois Social Structure" section and in Series VIII-D see the "Cayuga Social Organization" folder with information on Myron Turkey. Additional Cayuga-related materials may be found in other folders not currently identified as Cayuga.
Collection: William N. Fenton papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.20)

Seneca
Language(s): English | Seneca
Date: 1936-1952
Type:Text
Extent: 1 volume
Description: Musicological analysis, attempt to relate musical patterns to "present ritual functions," and some consideration of speculative questions of chronology and individual creativity. This material is restricted due to potential cultural sensitivity.
Collection: Ceremonial Songs of the Tonawanda Seneca Longhouse (Mss.497.3.K965st)

Cherokee
Language(s): English | Cherokee
Date: 1828-1905; 1939-1975
Description: The Cherokee materials in the Lounsbury Papers is found primarily in several sections of the collection. Series I contains correspondence with a number of people on Cherokee language and culture. These correspondents include Harry Basehart, William Cook, William Fenton, John D. Gillespie, Mary Haas, Jack Kilpatrick, John Witthoft. In Series II, see the "Cherokee" section, which contains 3 boxes of research materials, including Lounsbury's field notes with numerous Cherokee speakers in Oklahoma, copies of original notes by other linguists, language instruction materials, and other related documents. The "General Iroquois" section contains some comparative materials as well, as may other sections to smaller degrees. Series VI contains multiple boxes of card files with Cherokee language data in the form of lexicons and texts in translation. In Series VII, there are several audio recordings, including a reading of Private John G. Burnett's eyewitness account of Cherokee removal, 1838-1839, and a significant number of recordings of songs and dances made by Will West Long and Della Owl, and Cherokee lessons by Robert Bushyhead and William Cook.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Cochiti
Alternate forms: Kotyit
Date: 1919-1940, 1957
Type:Text
Extent: 552 pages, 6 notebooks
Description: The Cochiti materials in the ACLS collection consist of several items in multiple sections of the finding aid. In the "Cochiti" section of the finding aid, there is a set of 5 field notebooks recorded by Boas in 1921-1922 containing his original field notes, texts, Vocabularies, paradigms, and notes in German shorthand. A second set of loose-leaf notes consists of texts with interlinear translations derived from the notebooks, 20 of which were later rendered into free translations by Ruth Benedict and published in 1931. In the "Keresan" section, Boas' "Keresan word list and linguistic notes" contains 8 folders of Laguna and Cochiti grammatical, linguistic, folkloristic, and ethnographic materials. His "Keresan lexical file" contains 8,000 Keresan terms, with some references to manuscripts from which they were derived, many of which are likely Cochiti. (This file may contain Western Keres as well.) In the "Laguna" section of the finding aid, Boas' "Laguna Vocabularies and texts" includes Keresan, Laguna, and Cochiti Vocabularies, grammatical notes, and texts. Lastly, in the "Tewa" section, "Cochiti and San Juan Pueblo songs" contains words, music, paraphrase of text, lists of ceremonial terms, and a "Phonologic chart for Cochiti Keresan and Tewa-Tanoan." NOTE: Portions of this material may be restricted due to potential cultural sensitivity.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Cochiti | Hopi
Alternate forms: Kotyit
Language(s): English
Date: undated
Subject: Music | Dance
Type:Text
Extent: 23 leaves
Description: Songs by Celestino Quintana, Cochiti Pueblo. Transcription of songs with brief discussion of choreography, music, and similarities between Hopi and Keresan styles. NOTE: Portions of this material may be restricted due to potential cultural sensitivity.
Collection: Miscellaneous Manuscripts Collection (Mss.Ms.Coll.200)

Cochiti
Alternate forms: Kotyit
Language(s): English | Keres, Eastern
Date: 1957
Genre: Interviews | Songs
Extent: 5 sound tape reels (4 hr.)
Description: Field recordings made at Cochiti Pueblo and Santa Fe, New Mexico in 1957 with Celestino Quintana of numerous dances, discussions of dances, song texts, and interviews for Keresan terminology and sound patterns. NOTE: Portions of this material may be restricted due to potential cultural sensitivity.
Collection: Keresan Recordings (Mss.Rec.24)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Chippewa
Language(s): English | Ojibwe
Date: November 16, 1830; February 25, 1836; June 29, 1847; August 12, 1898; May 10, 1912; 1956
Type:Text
Extent: 6 items
Description: Relavent materials can be found in the finding aid under the specific dates listed. Nineteenth-century correspondence from Kah-ge-ga-gah-bowh (George Copway) regarding Chippewa education efforts; Schoolcraft's work on "Indian tales," a vocabulary of the Algic requested by James Barbour, and biographical sketches of chiefs; Kidder obtained tales from Charley Bawgam and Jack LaPique on murder of trader, Aitken, 1837, and on mermaid tradition among Ojibwe. Under May 10, 1912, there is a 2-page "A Story of Turtle and His Brother'' in Ojibwe and English, told by Edwin Maness of Sarnia Reserve, Ontraio, and recorded by Edward Sapir. Also 1956 transcription of the Ojibwe songs from Lac du Flambeau by Willie Catfish, cataloged in Mss.Rec.75.
Collection: Miscellaneous Manuscripts Collection (Mss.Ms.Coll.200)

Ojibwe
Date: 1948, 1967-1968, 1985, 1993-1997, 2012-2015
Extent: 1883 pages, 72 photographs, 1 film
Description: The Ojibwe materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of several items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Beckett, Gills, Hele, Jackson, Kurath, Morse, Pollak, Powers, White, Willets, and Wishart.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Onondaga | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English | Onondaga
Date: 1891-1901, 1908, 1936-1949, 1951-1952, 1968-1971, 1986, 1992, 1995
Type:Text
Extent: .5 linear feet
Description: The Onondaga materials in the Fenton papers include multiple correspondents in Series I, such as Onondaga Nation, Howard Skye, and James Skye. In Series III, see ""Concerning the League: a motif analysis of the Gibson-Goldenweiser version of the Deganawidah Epic," "The Funeral of Tadodaho: Onondaga of Today," and "Sir William Johnson Carries the Ritual of Condolence over the Path to Onondaga, 1756." In Series IV, see articles by Bradley, Kurath, and Woodbury. Series VI includes "Onondaga Longhouse Food Spirit Festival." Series VIII-A, Series VIII-B, and Series VIII-F, include several folders of Onondaga-related materials. Some of these materials are restricted due to cultural sensitivity concerns.
Collection: William N. Fenton papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.20)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe | Odawa
Alternate forms: Chippewa, Ojibwa, Ojibway, Odawa
Language(s): English
Date: 1955
Type:Text
Extent: 1 volume
Description: The draft of an unpublished book. Includes pictures and musical scores. Attempts, by detailed analysis and description of present-day customs in historical perspective to evaluate powwows, feasts, and camp meetings in Ottawa culture. Twelve chapters give brief history, biographies, and locations; describe festivals and dances in detail; analyze native songs (scores); describe a Chippewa Methodist camp meeting and hymns, with analysis of hymn texts and tunes. Also, presnnts Ottawa superstitions (bear walking, medicines, herbs), 42 Ottawa myths (see also #2642), material on natural-history usage. Attempts to reconstruct function of ritual, with historical references. 
Collection: Religious Customs of Modern Michigan Algonquians (Mss.497.3.K965a)