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Otomi | Chitimacha | Atakapa | Cherokee | Osage | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Nottoway | Kaw | Omaha | Dakota | Pawnee | Nanticoke | A'aninin | Miami | Mi'kmaq | Seminole | Quapaw | Yuchi | Delaware | Ojibwe | Shawnee | Seneca | Mohawk | Onondaga | Cayuga | Oneida | Tuscarora | Natchez | Wyandot | Creek | Mohican | Mohegan
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Ojibwa, Huron-Wyandot, Atsina, Gros Ventre, Micmac, Lenape
Date: 1798-1821
Type:Text
Extent: 219 pages
Description: This volume contains extracts of Benjamin Smith Barton's "New Views of the Origin of the Tribes and Nations of America" (Philadelphia, 1797), with additions by Peter S. Du Ponceau. The bulk of the volume is comprised of word list of 54 words with equivalents listed in a range of 50-70 languages. While Barton listed no authority, Du Ponceau cited sources. Languages with words listed include Chitimacha, Atakapa, Cherokee, Osage, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Nottoway, Kansa, Omaha, Dakota, Pawnee, Nanticoke, Gros Ventres, Miami, Mi'kmaq, Seminole, Quapaw, Yuchi, Delaware, Ojibwe, Shawnee, Seneca, Mohawk, Onondaga, Cayuga, Oneida, Tuscarora, Natches, Wyandot, Creek, Mahican, Mohegan, and many others. The word list includes the terms for God, heaven, and sky, as well as various terms relating to kinship, parts of the body, weather, and more. The volume also includes notes on sounds of the Otomi (Othomi) observations on declension; observations about the Omaha, Kansa, Oto, Arkansas, and Missouri languages; and notes on symbol and sound. Also includes a newspaper clipping of a review (in German) of Barton's "New Views" that appeared in "Göttingische Anzeigen von gelehrten Sachen," June 17, 1799.
Collection: A comparative vocabulary of Indian languages (Mss.497.B28)

Cherokee | Oneida | Onondaga | Cayuga | Seneca | Tuscarora | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Date: 1946-1989
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: The Cayuga materials in the Lounsbury Papers are located primarily in the "Cayuga" section of Series II, which contains extensive field notes and transcriptions made by both Lounsbury and Michael Foster of Cayuga stories and speeches given by Alexander General, Howard Skye, and Mrs. George Green, along with related discussions. See also Series VII, Audio Recordings, which includes some recordings featuring the Thanksgiving Address and the Condolence ceremony. See also correspondence in Series I, which includes Michael K. Foster's work on Cayuga Midwinter ceremonies, William Sturtevant's work with Oklahoma Seneca-Cayuga, and Marius Barbeau's materials on Cayuga and Tuscarora.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Cherokee
Language(s): Cherokee | English
Date: 1958
Genre: Stories
Extent: 3 sound tape reels (2 hr. 2 min.)
Description: Field recordings made in North Carolina in 1958 of Cherokee sacred formulae dealing. The entirety of this recording collection has been designated as culturally sensitive and restricted.
Collection: Cherokee formulae (Mss.Rec.36)

Cherokee
Language(s): Cherokee | English
Date: 1941-1946; 1951-1952
Extent: 1,652 pages, 920 slips, 59 phonograph discs, 4,500 cards
Description: The Cherokee materials in the ACLS collection consist of 3 sets of material located in the "Cherokee" section of the finding aid. The smallest item is Frans Olbrechts' brief essay comparing Cherokee and Ethiopic syllabaries. Two linguistic studies comprise the bulk of the remaining materials. Zellig Harris and John Witthoft's "Cherokee materials" was conducted in Philadelphia at the University of Pennsylvania and consists of grammatical Vocabularies and utterances, extensive grammatical notes and analyses, and numerous ethnographic and autobiographical stories, plus some songs, recorded on phonograph discs with Molly Sequoyah (mainly) and Will French. A small number of texts are written in the Cherokee syllabary as well. A second linguistic study by William Reyburn, conducted in Cherokee, N.C., consists of 1000+ pages of linguistic notes, transcriptions of recordings, and analyses, plus an extensive lexical file organized according to morpheme class. Reyburn's accompanying recordings are cataloged as Mss.Rec.16, "Cherokee materials gathered...on the Cherokee reservation at Cherokee, N.C.," listed separately in this guide.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Cherokee
Language(s): English | Cherokee
Date: 1818-1899
Type:Text
Extent: 8 items
Description: Items relating to Cherokee materials at the American Philosophical Society. Topics include a memorandum and letters written by Peter Stephen du Ponceau regarding Native languages, especially Cherokee; Du Ponceau, Abbe Correia da Serra, and John Vaughan's visit with two Cherokee boys being sent to school in Connecticut. One (Leonard Hicks) referred du Ponceau to Butrick's Cherokee grammar; D. S. Butrick's plan to prepare a Cherokee grammar modeled on Zeisberger's Delaware grammar, and other information on Cherokee language that he sent to du Ponceau upon the latter's request; Butrick's hope that these studies will aid the Cherokees, and his plea for attention to Cherokees seeking Christ; Frank Cushing's inquiries about a William Bartram manuscript once in possession of Samuel G. Morton according to notes of Ephraim G. Squier, and about a John H. Payne manuscript on Cherokees; and James Mooney's request about the location of John Howard Payne's manuscript on the Cherokee which was cited in Ephraim G. Squier's Serpent Symbol (1851). Other individuals mentioned include Colonel Return Jonathan Meigs, John Gambold, Isaac Minis Hays, and Rev. Samuel Worcester.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Cherokee
Language(s): Cherokee | English
Date: circa 1784, 1800, 1818
Type:Text
Extent: 42 pages
Description: The Cherokee materials in this collection consist of manuscripts listed in the finding aid as items 2, 5, 6, 38, 39, 41, 42. These include Vocabularies in various forms, some comparing Cherokee to other languages, as well as correspondence discussing Cherokee linguistics features, and one complaining of white harassment of Cherokees to be removed.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Historical and Literary Committee, American Indian Vocabulary Collection    (Mss.497.V85)

Cherokee | Seneca | Oneida
Language(s): English | Cherokee
Date: circa 1946-1953 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 3 folders
Description: Three items relating to the Cherokee language have been identified in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. In Subcollection I, there is relevant correspondence with Floyd Lounsbury (regarding Oneida, Seneca, and Cherokee work) in Series I. Correspondence. In Subcollection II, there is a Cherokee folder in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries IV. Macro-Siouan; and William D. Reyburn's "Cherokee Verb Morphology" (circa 1953) in Series IV. Works by Others.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Cherokee
Language(s): Cherokee | English
Date: 1974-2008
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 4 folders
Description: Daythal Kendall's few Cherokee materials include an article by Duane King presented at the American Anthropological Association meetings of 1977, and correspondence with several others that briefly mentions Cherokee, mostly in Kendall's capacity at the American Philosophical Society.
Collection: Daythal L. Kendall Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.148)

Cherokee
Language(s): English | Cherokee
Date: 1828-1905; 1939-1975
Description: The Cherokee materials in the Lounsbury Papers is found primarily in several sections of the collection. Series I contains correspondence with a number of people on Cherokee language and culture. These correspondents include Harry Basehart, William Cook, William Fenton, John D. Gillespie, Mary Haas, Jack Kilpatrick, John Witthoft. In Series II, see the "Cherokee" section, which contains 3 boxes of research materials, including Lounsbury's field notes with numerous Cherokee speakers in Oklahoma, copies of original notes by other linguists, language instruction materials, and other related documents. The "General Iroquois" section contains some comparative materials as well, as may other sections to smaller degrees. Series VI contains multiple boxes of card files with Cherokee language data in the form of lexicons and texts in translation. In Series VII, there are several audio recordings, including a reading of Private John G. Burnett's eyewitness account of Cherokee removal, 1838-1839, and a significant number of recordings of songs and dances made by Will West Long and Della Owl, and Cherokee lessons by Robert Bushyhead and William Cook.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)