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Otomi | Chitimacha | Atakapa | Cherokee | Osage | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Nottoway | Kaw | Omaha | Dakota | Pawnee | Nanticoke | A'aninin | Miami | Mi'kmaq | Seminole | Quapaw | Yuchi | Delaware | Ojibwe | Shawnee | Seneca | Mohawk | Onondaga | Cayuga | Oneida | Tuscarora | Natchez | Wyandot | Creek | Mohican | Mohegan
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Ojibwa, Huron-Wyandot, Atsina, Gros Ventre, Micmac, Lenape
Date: 1798-1821
Type:Text
Extent: 219 pages
Description: This volume contains extracts of Benjamin Smith Barton's "New Views of the Origin of the Tribes and Nations of America" (Philadelphia, 1797), with additions by Peter S. Du Ponceau. The bulk of the volume is comprised of word list of 54 words with equivalents listed in a range of 50-70 languages. While Barton listed no authority, Du Ponceau cited sources. Languages with words listed include Chitimacha, Atakapa, Cherokee, Osage, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Nottoway, Kansa, Omaha, Dakota, Pawnee, Nanticoke, Gros Ventres, Miami, Mi'kmaq, Seminole, Quapaw, Yuchi, Delaware, Ojibwe, Shawnee, Seneca, Mohawk, Onondaga, Cayuga, Oneida, Tuscarora, Natches, Wyandot, Creek, Mahican, Mohegan, and many others. The word list includes the terms for God, heaven, and sky, as well as various terms relating to kinship, parts of the body, weather, and more. The volume also includes notes on sounds of the Otomi (Othomi) observations on declension; observations about the Omaha, Kansa, Oto, Arkansas, and Missouri languages; and notes on symbol and sound. Also includes a newspaper clipping of a review (in German) of Barton's "New Views" that appeared in "Göttingische Anzeigen von gelehrten Sachen," June 17, 1799.
Collection: A comparative vocabulary of Indian languages (Mss.497.B28)

Algonquian | Mohegan | Nipmuc | Pequot
Language(s): English
Date: 1932
Type:Text
Genre: Essays
Extent: 1 folder
Description: The Connecticut Indian materials in the Fenton papers can be found in Series III, which includes Fenton's 1932 paper, "The Connecticut Algonkians," written for George P. Murdock's course in ethnology at Yale. Additional material may potentially exist among correspondence in Series I.
Collection: William N. Fenton papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.20)

Mohegan
Language(s): English | Mohegan-Pequot
Date: circa 1920s
Extent: 1 folder; 26 photographs
Description: The Mohegan materials in Series V of the A. Irving Hallowell Papers are composed of stories in Mohegan translated into English, brief grammatical notes, two pages of vocabulary, and 2 maps of Native American tribes in Connecticut. In the folder labled "American Indian #4 in Box 24, Series V, there is an image of Gladys and Harold Tantaquidgeon. In Series VI, Subseries D, there are about 26 photographs identified as Mohegan-related.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Mohegan | Pequot | Yuchi | Nanticoke
Language(s): English | Mohegan-Pequot
Date: 1897-1943
Type:Text
Extent: 10 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Mohegan language, history, and culture. Includes Mohegan miscellaneous notes and correspondence from 1916-1943 including commentary on Fidelia Fielding's Texts, notes for 1920 Pequot trip with Nehantic and Pennacook notes, letters from the Honorable Thomas W. Bicknell to Speck concerning Indians in Rhode Island, notes on Mohegan social organization, 1 page of incomplete letter of Red Wing concerning Indian affairs, miscellaneous Stockbridge notes, George Heye to Speck regarding publication, John R. Swanton to Speck concerning his exhibition for Mohegan Stockbridge, postal card from Princess Pretty War regarding dress, Ernest E. Rogers to Speck regarding Speck's Mohegan-Pequot Diary, etc.; Pequot miscellaneous notes and correspondence from 1922-1941 including two cards with Mohegan names, 7 pages of reading notes, 1 page of animal names, a letter from Harral Ayres to the Smithsonian Institution concerning Connecticut place names, and a letter from Gertrude Bell Browne to Speck concerning seventeenth-century Pequot-Mohegan Mohegan-Pequot texts and vocabulary materials, notes and drafts relating to Speck (1928a); letters to his mother concerning his activities among Indians at Mohegan, Connecticut; copy for a news release on a Mohegan election; "Mohegan Land Deeds," a pamplet containing 22 seventeenth-century deeds signed by Connecticut Mohegan Indians, taken from Connecticut archival sources; 21 cards with notes on trees and uses of their products; Prince's 1907 letter of recommendation for Speck, discussing Speck's work, as a student, on the Pequot dialect of Mohegan-Pequots, Algic, and Yuchi; and Ward's correspondence with Speck regarding the printing of extra copies of Speck's Nanticoke study by the Historical Society of Delaware.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Mohegan | Montauk | Pequot
Language(s): English | Mohegan-Pequot
Date: 1756-1787; 1903
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Description: The Mohegan materials in the Siebert Papers are limited to an 18th century Vocabularies and Siebert's collection of Mohegan-Pequot and Montauk vocabulary. See Series IV and VII.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Mohegan
Language(s): English
Date: 1983, 1990
Type:Text
Extent: 97 pages
Description: The Mohegan materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 2 items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Simmons and Weinstein-Farson.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Mohegan
Language(s): English
Date: 1990
Genre: Interviews
Extent: 6 sound tape reels (2 hr., 45 min.)
Description: Interviews with Mohegan elders regarding various aspects 20th-century Mohegan history, recorded in Connecticut in 1990.
Collection: Mohegan Oral Histories (Mss.Rec.162)

Narragansett | Mohegan | Pequot | Cherokee
Language(s): English | Narragansett
Date: 1916-1926
Type:Text
Extent: 2 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Narragansett language, history, and culture. Includes a one-page report on "Physical measurements of the Narragansett male," based on an individual described as 1/4 Nehantic and 1/2 Brotherton (Narragansett); and Speck's miscellaneous Narragansett notes, comprised of a comparative vocabulary of Massachusetts, Narragansett, Mohegan, Pequot, and Naugatuck (approximately 30 items), 3 vocabulary lists on cards, 1 page of names, and a letter from Edmund B. Delabarre to Speck, May 6, 1920, regarding the author's preference of Cherokee to Narragansett as explanation of origin of characters on Rhode Island stone. Images note: newspaper clipping photographs peace pipe, native attire, tipi.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Anishinaabe | Delaware | Susquehannock | Erie | Wenrohronon | Honniasont | Mohegan | Seneca | Oneida | Wyandot | Ottawa | Tuscarora | Sappony | Tutelo | Nanticoke | Conoy | Shawnee | Munsee
Alternate forms: Conestoga, Iroquois, Lenape, Saponi
Language(s): English
Date: 1957
Type:Text
Genre: Reports
Extent: 20 pages
Description: The Pennsylvania Indians materials, John Alden Mason Papers include a document written for the Pennsylvania Historical Commission, regarding the Delaware, Susquehannock, Erie, Wenrohronon, Honniasont, and the transitory Mohegan, Seneca, Oneida, Wyandot, Ottawa, Tuscarora, Saponi, Tutelo, Nanticokes, Conoy, Shawnee, and Munsee.
Collection: John Alden Mason Papers (Mss.B.M384)

Penobscot | Passamaquoddy | Maliseet | Mi'kmaq | Haudenosaunee | Abenaki | Delaware | Mohegan | Mohican | Zuni | Navajo | Tutelo | Wabanaki
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Micmac, Lenape, Mahican, Malecite
Language(s): English | Abenaki, Eastern
Date: 1908-1947
Extent: 27 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Penobscot language, history, and culture, and his preparation of his book Penobscot Man. This includes several folders of Speck's field notes, notes organized around specific topics (including data not used in Speck's published works), copies and drafts of lectures and essays, correspondence, etc. Topics include Penobscot social organization, calendar system, house furnishings, hunting morality, animal lore, religion, art, sayings, alphabet, counting and measuring, canoe-making, face-painting, texts with interlineal translations, and "Bird Lore of the Northern Indians" (a faculty public lecture at the University of Pennsylvania). Additionally, significant correspondence concerns the preparation, expenses, dissemination, and reception of his Penobscot publications. Other topics of correspondence include Ethel Gandy's monograph on Penobscot art; names of chiefs and their clans; "clown" performances outside of the southwest among the Penobscot, Iroquois [Haudenosaunee], Abenaki, and Delaware; place names; the relationship of Penobscot-Mohegan and Mahican; a comparison of Zuni-Navajo and Red Paint; Tutelo. There is a particularly large folder of Speck's miscellaneous Penobscot notes containing both a variety of notes and correspondence from Penobscot consultants as well as non-Native colleagues. These include letters from Roland E. Nelson (Needahbeh, Penobscot) concerning drum for exhibit; letters from Nelson, Franz Boas, John M. Cooper, William B. Goodwin, E. V. McCollum, and J. Dyneley Prince, all concerning Penobscot Man; Clifford P. Wilson concerning moosehair embroidery; Edward Reman concerning Norse influence on Penobscot; Carrie A. Lyford concerning moose-wool controversy and Ann Stimson's report; Ann Stimson, letter of thanks; Henry Noyes Otis concerning genealogy of Indians named Sias on Cape Cod (Speck marked this Penobscot); Princess Pretty Woman (Passamaquoddy) concerning her dress (apparently at the Penn Museum); Dorothy Ranco (Penobscot) concerning Princess Pretty Woman's dress; Roland W. Mann, concerning site of Indian occupancy according to Penobscot tradition; Ryuzo Torii, letter of introduction. Other miscellaneous items include a 5-page transcript of agreements between Indians of Nova Scotia and the English, August 15, 1749; 2 pages, transcript of agreement of July 13, 1727 (letter of transmittal, Lloyd Price to Miss MacDonald, September 24, 1936); Ann K. Stimson, Moose Wool and Climbing Powers of the American Mink; miscellaneous field notes on topics like songs, kinship, totem, medicine, and social units; and 4 pages of Penobscot words and their cultural use.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)