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Catawba | Cherokee | Tutelo
Language(s): English | Catawba | Tutelo
Date: 1716; 1803; 1951-1997
Extent: 7 boxes
Description: The Catawba materials in the Frank Siebert Papers are primarily concentrated in Series II. These consist of copies of secondary sources such as an "Indian Vocabulary from Fort Christanna, 1716, Catawba census notes, 1830-1929, land claim agreements, and a dictionary of Place names in South Carolina. Original materials include hundreds of pages of Siebert's FIeld notes and a Catawba vocabulary / dictionary done with Wes Taukchiray.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Cherokee
Language(s): English
Date: 1792-1796
Type:Text
Extent: 2 items
Description: Correspondence relating to Cherokees. Letter to Thomas Pennant, sending specimens of birds called Onacloneita by visiting Cherokee Indians; and letter to John G. E. Heckewelder, inquiring whether any Indians ever have a sickly white color or white spots on them and mentioning Cherokee belief that their ancestors found a race of "develish white-people" when they came to the area then inhabited. [From original in the Gilbert Collection, College of Physicians, Philadelphia.]
Collection: Violetta Delafield-Benjamin Smith Barton Collection (Mss.B.B284d)

Inuit
Alternate forms: Eskimo
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1905-1956
Extent: 44 folders; 1 box
Description: The Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers are a vast collection of materials relating to Wallace's work at the intersection of anthropology, psychology, and history. Though further research might yield more results, approximately 45 items directly pertaining to the Inuit (formerly Eskimos) have been identified. Wallace was particularly interested in arctic hysteria (piblokto) among the Inuit and other polar populations, and 27 folders of research materials on this topic can be found in Series VII. Eastern Pennsylvania Psychiatric Institute. Of particular interest might be the images in Series XII. Graphics, which include 13 folders of images of individuals (and some dogs) going about normal activites and--at another time--suffering from arctic hysteria. There is also a copy of Wallace's "Interdisciplinary Approaches to Mental Disorder Among the Polar Eskimos of Northwest Greenland" in Series IV. Works by Wallace A. Professional; several copies of articles by other scholars on Inuit and other arctic populations in Series VI. Consulting and Committee Work B. U.S.-Soviet Commission on Anthropology; and one box of research notecards in Series III. Notecards. Among Wallace's many correspondents, files for Robert Ackerman, the American Philosophical Society, the Arctic Health Research Center, the Arctic Institute of North America, Edmund Snow Carpenter, Nancy Yaw Davis, David Landy, Raymond Neutra, and Douglas Oliver include references to Inuits and other Arctic peoples. See the finding aid for a detailed discussion of Wallace's long and varied career, and for an itemized list of the collection's contents.
Collection: Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.64a)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Ojibway, Saulteaux
Date: 1932-1949
Description: The Ojibwe materials in the A. Irving Hallowell Papers are extensive. Hallowell focused on three regions of Ojibwe territory: Berens River in north, central Canada (Pikangikum, Pauingassi, Poplar River; Little Grand Rapids First Nations) and Lac du Flambeau in Wisconsin. Hallowell was particularly interested in psychological anthropology. Both the Berens River and Lac du Flambeau materials in Series V, for example, includes ethnographic information on taboos, incest regulations, Rorschach tests, dreams, and acculturation. Hallowell's interests in traditional knowledge are represented by descriptions of the practice of the Midewiwin religion; traditional stories about Wisakedjak and Tcakabec/Chakabesh, Memegwesiug, Windigos, and Thunderbirds. Of particular interest in the Lac du Flambeau materials are hundred of pages of family biographies in Series V and photographs with the names of community members in Series VI, Subseries B. Of particular interest in the Berens River materials are maps of traditional hunting grounds, a diagram of Ojibwe cosmology, an autobiography by Hallowell's collaborator Chief William Berens, 29 folders of "Saulteaux Indians--Myths and Tales" all in Series V. There are hundreds of photographs from the region, with many community members identified, and all digitized, in Series VI, Subseries A. The correspondence, in Series I, includes Robert Ritzenhaler's description of a shaking tent ceremony by Ojibwe in Wisconsin; a detailed account of Joseph Fiddler's trial for murdering a windigo in the folder labled Royal Canadian Mounted Police; papers sent by Morton Teicher detailing incidents of windigo in Canada (50+ pages); a letter from Frances Densmore describing a shaking tent ceremony; and several letters from Chief William Berens providing information about Ojibwe people in the photographs in Series VI.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)