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Otomi | Chitimacha | Atakapa | Cherokee | Osage | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Nottoway | Kaw | Omaha | Dakota | Pawnee | Nanticoke | A'aninin | Miami | Mi'kmaq | Seminole | Quapaw | Yuchi | Delaware | Ojibwe | Shawnee | Seneca | Mohawk | Onondaga | Cayuga | Oneida | Tuscarora | Natchez | Wyandot | Creek | Mohican | Mohegan
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Ojibwa, Huron-Wyandot, Atsina, Gros Ventre, Micmac, Lenape
Date: 1798-1821
Type:Text
Extent: 219 pages
Description: This volume contains extracts of Benjamin Smith Barton's "New Views of the Origin of the Tribes and Nations of America" (Philadelphia, 1797), with additions by Peter S. Du Ponceau. The bulk of the volume is comprised of word list of 54 words with equivalents listed in a range of 50-70 languages. While Barton listed no authority, Du Ponceau cited sources. Languages with words listed include Chitimacha, Atakapa, Cherokee, Osage, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Nottoway, Kansa, Omaha, Dakota, Pawnee, Nanticoke, Gros Ventres, Miami, Mi'kmaq, Seminole, Quapaw, Yuchi, Delaware, Ojibwe, Shawnee, Seneca, Mohawk, Onondaga, Cayuga, Oneida, Tuscarora, Natches, Wyandot, Creek, Mahican, Mohegan, and many others. The word list includes the terms for God, heaven, and sky, as well as various terms relating to kinship, parts of the body, weather, and more. The volume also includes notes on sounds of the Otomi (Othomi) observations on declension; observations about the Omaha, Kansa, Oto, Arkansas, and Missouri languages; and notes on symbol and sound. Also includes a newspaper clipping of a review (in German) of Barton's "New Views" that appeared in "Göttingische Anzeigen von gelehrten Sachen," June 17, 1799.
Collection: A comparative vocabulary of Indian languages (Mss.497.B28)

Haudenosaunee | Oneida | Onondaga | Seneca | Mohawk | Tuscarora | Nottoway
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Onkwehón:we
Language(s): English
Date: 1816-1820
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 6 items
Description: Items relating to Haudenosaunee materials, mostly the correspondence of Peter S. du Ponceau as he sought to obtain linguistic materials. This includes an exchange with Jason Chamberlain, who was referred to du Ponceau by Thomas Jefferson, mentioning an "Indian spelling book" [Gaiatonsera (1813)] and Eleazer Williams; a letter to Williams listing Iroquois works at the American Philosophical Society and requesting "more data"; a letter to Joseph P. Norris asking for records pertaining to the conference between Scaroyady of the Six Nations and some members of the Society of Friends [for reply, see also Norris to Du Ponceau, June 19, 1818]; a letter to Jefferson forwarding comparative Iroquoian vocabularies (Oneida, Onondaga, Seneca, Mohawk, Tuscarora with Nottoway); and a memorandum by du Ponceau concerning H. G. Spofford's (of Albany) directions to contact Eleazer Williams (Oneida Castle, Oneida New York) for Indian vocabularies.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Arawak | Dakota | Delaware | Haudenosaunee | Nottoway | Seneca | Tuscarora | Wyandot
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Huron, Wendat
Language(s): English
Date: October 7, 1820; June 4, 1818; September 21, 1818; August 12, 1818; July 1, 1819; July 15, 1820
Subject: History | Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 6 letters
Description: Concerning vocabularies of Huron-Wyandot and Delaware. Mentions Steinhauer and Schulz, who has an Arawak dictionary. Heckewelder offers corrections to Du Ponceau's publication. Discusses Leatherlip's Huron-Wyandot identity. Claims Nottoway, Naudowessie, and Huron are the same. Recounts how Tuscarora broke from Haudenosaunee.
Collection: John Gottlieb Ernestus Heckewelder letters to Peter Stephen Du Ponceau  (Mss.497.3 H35o)

Delaware | Nottoway
Date: 1840
Subject: Botany | Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 1 volume, 11 p.
Description: This small manuscript volume contains a brief vocabulary written down by John Wood "from an old Indian Woman of the name of Edie Turner the 4th of March 1820"; together with newsclipping, Petersburg, Virginia, March 17, identifying informant and relating Nottoway, Powhatan and Welsh. The vocabulary is listed by semantic categories "Of the Universe; Of the Human Species; Of Animals; Vegetable Kingdom; Division of Time; Domestic Essays; Adjectives; Verbs." Marginal comparisons with Tuscarora, Onondaga, Wyandot, Delaware, etc., probably by Peter S. Du Ponceau. [See also letters of Jefferson to Du Ponceau, July 7, 1820; Du Ponceau to Jefferson, July 12, 1820.] This item is bound with a list of the Latin and botanical names of the plants, prepared by Christian Frederick Kampman, and with John Wood, "Vocabulary of the language of the Nottoway Tribe of Indians..." (1820).
Collection: Names of various trees, shrubs, and plants in the language of the Lennape (Mss.497.3.W85)

Nottoway
Language(s): English | Nottoway
Date: 1784
Type:Text
Extent: 3 pages
Description: The Nottoway materials in this collection consist of manuscripts listed in the finding aid as items 47 and 49, which are two letters relating to collection of Nottoway vocabulary and "Remarks on Indian names still to be found," with etymology of "Tuckahoe" and other Nottoway words, tracing them to Arabic and Hebrew roots.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Historical and Literary Committee, American Indian Vocabulary Collection    (Mss.497.V85)

Nottoway | Onondaga | Mohawk | Haudenosaunee | Dakota | Wyandot | Powhatan
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Sioux, Huron, Wendat
Language(s): English | French
Date: 1820-1821
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 5 items
Description: Correspondence of Peter S. du Ponceau regarding the Nottoway language. Includes three letters to Thomas Jefferson regarding Nottoway as Iroquoian language, numbers, Onondaga and Mohawk, Nottoway-Naudowesie-Huron, Heckewelder's letter on Powhatan being Delaware (#1153), Carver's Naudowessit, Wilson's Nottoway vocabulary, Pickering's essay on orthography, and his search for Mattapony and Pamunkey Vocabularies; letter to Friedrich von Adelung, thanking him for publications and forwarding membership certificate and books on Indian languages, including Nottoway vocabulary manuscript; letter to John G. E. Heckewelder concerning Indians and their languages, especially Naudowessie, Sioux, Huron, Nottoway [Reply to July 15 letter (#1713)].
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Nottoway
Language(s): English
Date: Undated
Type:Text
Genre: Notes | Maps
Extent: 1 folder
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of the Nottoway. Includes two pages of miscellaneous notes and a map of the Eastern Maryland shore.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Tuscarora | Seneca | Dakota | Haudenosaunee | Ojibwe | Shawnee | Miami | Otomi | Powhatan | Mohawk | Natchez | San Felipe | Nottoway | Ho-Chunk
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Ojibwa, Winnebago, Sioux, Keres
Language(s): English
Date: 1801-1843
Type:Text
Extent: 33 items
Description: Correspondence, largely from Peter S. du Ponceau to Albert Gallatin, regarding legal and political matters, Indian languages and linguistics, philological matters, and the American Philosophical Society. Specific topics include exchanges of publications and manuscripts between the two men; the creation of a map of Indian languages; the government's collecting of Indian vocabularies and du Ponceau's refusal to supply Historical and Literary Committee material to the government, believing that the committee rather than the government should undertake the collection and publication of Indian materials; methods of seeking data on languages, and the difficulties of sentence for testing problems of comparative Vocabularies;s both already published and in progess, such as Eliot's Grammar, Barton (1797), Pickering (1820), Hodgson on the Berber, Najera (1837), Zeisberger (1830), Gallatin (1836), Prichard (1813), several of du Ponceau's works, etc.; du Ponceau's acceptance of copies of Gallatin's Synopsis, with a jab at its Worcester (rather than APS) the fate of the manuscript for du Ponceau's prize essay: the printer bankrupt, difficulties in getting manuscript returned, and du Ponceau has no full copy; of du Ponceau's study of Chinese;s and the Transactions of the Historical and Literary Committee; du Ponceau's acceptance of vocabularies on behalf of the the state of European linguistics; Pickering's alphabet for Indian languages; Carib women's vs. men's the opposition founding of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, and du Ponceau's efforts to make peace by submitting his translation of Vater's Enquiry for them to publish; illnesses and deaths in du Ponceau's family; and du Ponceau's age, health, and failing eyesight. Other individuals mentioned include Franklin, Rush, Rittenhouse, Jefferson, Cass, Schoolcraft, Long, Ebeling, Adelung, Klaproth, Balbi, Humboldt, Volney, and Heckewelder. Originals at the New York Historical Society.
Collection: Peter Stephen Du Ponceau letters, 1801-1843, to Albert Gallatin (Mss.Film.541)

Catawba | Nottoway | Sappony
Language(s): English
Date: 1728
Type:Text
Extent: 1 volume
Description: The only known copy of a manuscript possibly earlier than Byrd's History (#525). This contains fewer Indian references and lacks interpolated information, but describes contact with Saponi and Nottoway Indians in 1728. Three pages missing; these are printed in Woodfin (1945), from fragments of early draft.
Collection: Secret history of the line between Virginia and North Carolina (Mss.975.5.B99s)