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A'aninin | Anishinaabe | Apache | Apache, Plains | Apache, Western | Arapaho | Arikara | Assiniboine | Blackfoot | Caddo | Catawba | Cayuga | Cherokee | Cheyenne | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Comanche | Creek | Crow | Delaware | Flathead | Haudenosaunee | Ho-Chunk | Hopi | Houma | Iñupiat | Iowa | Isleta | Kaw | Kickapoo | Laguna | Lakota | Mandan | Menominee | Meskwaki | Munsee | Nez Perce | Ojibwe | Omaha | Oneida | Oto | Ottawa | Penobscot | Pawnee | Ponca | Potawatomi | Quapaw | Seminole | Seneca | Shawnee | Shoshone | Stockbridge-Munsee | Tsimshian | Wabanaki | Wichita | Wyandot
Alternate forms: Arapahoe, Chippewa, Eskimo, Gros Ventre, Iroquois, Kansa, Lenape, Muscogee, Niimíipu, Odawa, Ojibwa, Ojibway, Salish, Sioux, Sac-and-Fox, Sauk-and-Fox, Winnebago, Wyandotte
Language(s): English
Date: 1939-1943
Extent: 0.25 linear feet
Description: There are a few items in the Frank G. Speck Papers currently identified as relating to Indian boarding schools.In the collection guide, under Subcollection 1, Series 1, in Section IV, "Southeast," see item IV(15H3), "Yuchi miscellaneous notes," which contains a letter from Ann Rolland (Haskell Institute), to Speck, April 6, 1941, as well as items under "C. Houma (Louisiana)" that relate to mission schools. In Section XIII, "Miscellaneous," see item XIII(22H), "Haskell Institute Roster," which lists of Native students and the Haskell Institute boarding school in 1939-1940, giving name, age, address, and tribe. (The tribes of the students included are listed above in this entry.) In Subcollection I, Series II, Biographical Material, see letters (listed alphabetically by author) from Leona E. Giger and Ann Rolland, both students at Haskell in the early 1940s. Also see letter from "Redge" and Gladys Laulin regarding Chippewa boy returning home for dances. In Series III, Photographs, there is an undated photograph [#10-14(a)] from the Shingwauk Indian Residential School. See also school-related photos in folders "Creek #3," "Eskimo [Inuit] (Labrador) #4," "Houma #1," #2, #7, and #8, "Pamunkey #6," and "Penobscot: People #2." In Series IV, Lantern Slides, there are slides of Native and Black students at the Hampton Institute. More boarding school-related material may be identified in the collection with further research.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Deg Xit'an | Yupik | Inuit | Iñupiat | Koyukon
Alternate forms: Anvik, Eskimo, Deg Hit'an,  Deg Hitan,  Degexit'an,  Kaiyuhkhotana, Ingalik (pej.), Iñupiaq
Date: 1976 and undated
Contributor: Unknown
Type:Text
Extent: 28 reels
Description: These texts, produced in the late-nineteenth and twentieth centuries, include dictionaries, vocabularies, grammars, and religious materials (hymns and sermons, etc. primarily Christian) of the Central Alaskan Yupik, Deg Xit'an (formerly known as Ingalik or Ingalit), Iñupiaq, and Koyukon languages. From originals on deposit by the Oregon Province Archives of the Society of Jesus at the Pacific Northwest Indian Center, Spokane, Washington. Guide book included.
Collection: Indian language collection: the Alaska native languages, 20th century (Mss.Film.1364)

Iñupiat
Alternate forms: Eskimo, Iñupiaq
Date: 1899; 1905; 1935
Extent: 50 pages; 18 drawings
Description: The Iñupiat materials in the ACLS collection consist of three items in the "Eskimo" section of the finding aid. Boas' "Comparative word list of Alaskan Eskimo, Siberian Eskimo, and Chukchee" includes vocabulary from Utqiagvik ("Point Barrow") and the Seward Peninsula. Alfred Francis' "Kungmit Eskimo vocabulary" consists of an approximately 300-word list recorded at Kotzebue, including terms for animals, kinship, parts of the body, natural objects, and other terms. Finally, Boas' "Drawings for 'Property Marks of Alaskan Eskimo'" includes drawing from which illustrations for Boas' 1899 article on this topic were made.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Iñupiat
Alternate forms: Eskimo, Iñupiaq
Date: 1947, 1950, and undated
Subject: Music
Genre: Songs
Extent: 10 minutes
Description: The Iñupiat materials in the Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers consists of two recordings of songs performed by singers from Point Hope, Alaska, originally recorded by Red McCloud of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police at Aklavik, Northwest Territories in 1947 or 1948.. The singers are not identified on the recording or in any accompanying documentation. Gillespie re-recorded them by playing them off an original phonograph recording on to a wire recording. Sound quality is poor. This program was made as part of a wire recording sent to Floyd Lounsbury by John W. Gillespie, containing recordings made by himself and excerpts of other field recordings he had acquired. Includes Gillespie's commentary made in 1950. This recording is found in "Series VII: Audio recordings" in the collection guide, on a larger recording titled "Gillespie: Wyandot." 
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Iñupiat
Alternate forms: Eskimo, Iñupiaq
Date: 1976
Type:Text
Genre: Essays
Extent: 106 pages
Description: The Iñupiat materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 1 item. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under McNabb: ""Conduct, Code, and Perception in Kobuk Inupiaq Culture," on Kobuk Iñupiaq (Northern Alaskan Inupiatan, Malimiutun) place names, semantics, and relations to culture. Based on fieldwork in Kiana, Kobuk River Valley, Northwestern Alaska, with main consultant named as Nita Sheldon of Noorvik.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Iñupiat | Yupik
Alternate forms: Eskimo, Iñupiaq
Language(s): English
Date: 1911-1918
Extent: 208 photographs
Description: Walter C. Shields was the Superintendent of Schools of the Northwest district of the Alaska division for the Bureau of Education of the United States Department of the Interior from 1910-1918. The photograph album reflects the dual role the Bureau of Education played in creating schools for Iñupiat children and domestic reindeer herding for their parents as part of a government project to impose Euro-American models of education and subsistence on Iñupiat communities. The 199 original black and white photographs, dated 1911-1913, reflect individual and group portraits of Inupiat Eskimos, interior and exterior views of their homes and schools, reindeer sleds and round-ups. Taken by Shields and his colleague H. Barnette, some specific locations include Barrow, Wainwright, Noatak, Selawik, Buckland, Candle, Deering, Wales, and Shishmaref. Nine other photographs, dated 1916, 1928, are of dwellings and dog sleds in the White Mountains.
Collection: Walter C. Shields Photograph album (Mss.SMs.Coll.4)