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Algonquian | Mohawk | Wiyot | Yurok | Lenape | Cree | Ojibwe | Onondaga | Crow | Omaha | Zuni | Yucatec | Quechua | Pawnee
Language(s): English | French | Algonquian
Date: 1948-1977
Type:Text
Description: The Algonquin materials in the Lounsbury Papers include information about indigenous place names, Delaware kinship terminology in Series II. Series III includes work on comparative linguistics, phonology, dialects. The correspondence in Series I contains letters on kinship systems from a diverse array of tribes.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Apache | Arapaho | Cheyenne | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Cree | Dakota | Lenape | Kiowa | Ojibwe | Pojoaque | Santa Clara | Shawnee | Tohono O'odham | Wichita | Zuni
Alternate forms: Sioux, Papago, Pueblo, Ojibwa
Language(s): English
Date: 1870-1934
Extent: 5 folders
Description: The Eugenics Record Office Records consist of 330.5 linear feet of materials relating to the ERO, founded in 1910 for the study of human heredity and as a repository for genetic data on human traits. The Eugenics Record Office Papers (1670-1964) contain trait schedules, newspaper clippings, manuscript essays, pedigree charts, article abstracts, reprints, magazine articles, bibliographies, photographs, hair samples, postcard pictures, card files, and some correspondence which document the projects of the Eugenics Record Office during the thirty-four years of its operation. Of particular interest might be Folder "A:9770-1-118 Indians from Oklahoma (Work Sent in by Mr. Paul Roofe)" (1926), containing 118 pages of Individual Analysis Cards containing personal and family information about students at the Haskell Institute in Lawrence, Kansas. There is also "Folder A:9770 #1. Indian Photographs, Bureau of American Ethnography" (1870-1912), containing 23 photographs of Native individuals, all men, most with both front and profile shots, and identifying information on the back. Cultures represented include Kiowa, Brule (Dakota), Apache, Delaware, Papago (Tohono O'odham), Arapaho, Wichita, Zuni, Santa Clara (Pueblo), Shawnee, Pojoaque (Pueblo), Cheyenne, and Bannock. Folder "A:9770 #3. American Indians" (1920-1934) contains material about Bolivia Indians, Chippewas (Ojibwe) in Michigan, and from Dr. Margaret W. Koenig of the Nebraska Medical Women's League regarding the family history of Permela Palmer (Chicksaw), who married a Choctaw and then a white man, and who was of particular note because of her supernumerary mammary glands and the similarly abnormal breast development of some of her daughters. Folder "A:974 x 7. Caucasian x Indian" (1920-1925) contains trait charts of mixed families, including charts of a French-Cree and Choctaw family and a French-Cree and Scotch-Cree family sent by Mrs. L. M. William of Battleford, Sask.; a three-page typed essay, "For a Universial Marriage Law," advocating the prohibition of mixed marriages, also attributed to Mrs. William; and a magazine article, intended to be humorous, titled "Indian Wives and White Husbands" by Josiah M. Ward. Folder "A:976 x 70. American Indian - Negro" (1919-1928) contains charts, anecdotal data, notes, etc. regarding the traits of mixed children of Native and African American parents, several examples of which are stamped State Normal School, Montclair, NJ; a letter from the state registrar of Virginia to the Census Bureau concerning the efforts of people trying to gain recogition as Chickahominy, Rappahannock, and other groups despite having been previously been designated as "mullatoes," fear about such people having "broken into the census as Indians," and from there "have gotten across into the white race," and hopes to clarify matters for the 1930 Censuses; and materials (interviews, family trees, forms, notes) from a study directed by A. H. Estabrook and I. E. McDougle of the Sociology Department of Sweet Briar College--with fieldwork (such as interviews) performed by Sweet Briar students--titled "The Isshys, An Indian-Negro-White Family Group Near Amherest, Virginia."
Collection: Eugenics Record Office Records (Mss.Ms.Coll.77)

Cree | Flathead | Inca | Haudenosaunee | Kaingang | Kiowa | Maya | Natchez | Navajo | Ojibwe | Pawnee | Sahaptin | Purépecha | Seneca | Zuni
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Navaho, Ojibwa, Saulteaux, Sioux, Tonawanda, Tarascan, Tarasco
Language(s): English
Date: 1935-1937
Type:Text
Genre: Notes
Extent: 2 volumes, 150 p.
Description: These items include notes on "primitive economics" (Incan) for A. Irving Hallowell and from seminars with Linton Satterthwaite (on Mayan architecture), E. B. Howard (on problems of the Clovis site in New Mexico), and others at the University of Pennsylvania. There are also notes taken at the 1936 meeting of the American Anthropological Association of papers by various anthropologists in attendance, including Ruth Benedict, Frederica de Laguna, Waiter Dyk, William N. Fenton, Alfred V. Kidder, David G. Mandelbaum, George P. Murdock, Arthur C. Parker, Elsie Clews Parsons, Gladys A. Reichard, William A. Ritchie, Linton Satterthwaite, Gene Weltfish, and others regarding Cree, Flathead, Iroquois (Haudenosaunee), Kaingang (Southern Brazil), Kiowa, Mayan, Natchez, Navajo, Ojibwa, Pawnee, Pueblos, Sahaptin, Saulteaux, Siouan, Tarascan, Tonawanda (Seneca), Zuni, etc.
Collection: Ernestine H. Wieder Singer notes (Mss.970.1.Si6)

Zuni
Language(s): English | Zuni
Date: 1965
Genre: Stories
Extent: 4 sound tape reels (4 hr., 46 min.)
Description: Field recordings made by Dennis Tedlock with Zuni storytellers. Consists of 9 traditional stories told in Zuni only, which were later published in Tedlock's "Finding the Center." These recordings may be restricted due to cultural sensitivity.
Collection: Finding the Center (Mss.Rec.93)

Hopi | Tohono O'odham | Nahua | Zuni
Alternate forms: Papago, Aztec
Date: 1975-1977 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 25 folders
Description: There are several items relating to the Hopi language in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. Items are located in both Subcollection I and Subcollection II. In Subcollection I, there is relevant correspondence with Kenneth L. Hale (regarding passivity, clowning, and comparisons to Papago [Tohono O'odham] and Walbiri) and Dennis Tedlock (regarding Tedlock's Zuni consultants' dealings with Hopi) in Series I. Correspondence; a "Papago and Hopi" file in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries III-B: Works Authored by Voegelin; and 6 folders of Hopi material (mostly consisting of handwritten linguistic notes in pencil) in Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-A: Language Notes. In Subcollection II, there is Hopi-related correspondence with Francis X. Grolling, S.J. (brief note mentioning two-hearted people and kachinas), Kenneth Hale (regarding Voegelin's Hopi research), Jerome Kirk (Voegelin mentions that his Hopi consultants prefer to use English directional terms), Ekkehart Malotki (regarding Hopi fieldwork and language), Joel M. Maring (regarding Eastern and Western Keresan and Hopi parallels), Raven I. McDavid, Jr. (brief note mentioning his enjoyment of Hopi fieldwork), Alice Schlegel (regarding teasing/humor), Morris Swadesh (mentions Charles Loloma), Unidentified (miscellaneous Hopi linguistic notes), and Gary Witherspoon (the world view problem, work of LaVerne Masayesva at MIT) in Series I. Correspondence. Also in Subcollection II, there is Hopi-Tewa material in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries VII. Kiowa-Tanoan; and two Hopi-related files in Subseries IX. Uto-Aztecan, except Hopi. These include a general "Hopi" folder and another folder of Edward A. Kennard's Hopi Texts, consisting of 5 typewritten texts in Hopi and English accompanied by two letters, Kennard to Voegelin, 1976-1977. There is also a copy of C. F. and F. M. Voegelin's "Hopi Number in Respect to Idiosyncracy" in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries I: General works; Helmut Gipper's "The conception of time and space in Hopi: Some necessary corrections to the views of B.L. Whorf" in Series IV. Works by Others; and a file for Tetelcingo Nahuatl (with Hopi comparison) in Series V. Card Files.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Maya | Mixe | Zuni | Tzeltal | Bororo
Date: 1963-1995
Description: The Maya materials in the Lounsbury Papers are extensive. The correspondence in Series I includes a Motul (Mayan) dictionary, discussion about translating Maya glyphs and calendrical calculations, the Popol Vuh. Series II consists of articles and manuscripts from a project identified as "Maya kinship unfin. project." Much of this work is focused on interpreting Maya hieroglyphs. In Series VII there are a number of recordings of Yucatec Maya made in the 1960s focused on vocabulary. The correspondence, in Series I, includes a dictionary by Rene Acuna, Lloyd Anderson's Etymologies of Mayan calendrical and astronomical terms, Anthony Aveni's interpretation of Maya hieroglyphs, Brent Berlin's decipherment of Maya hieroglyphs, Gordon Brotherston's comments on FGL's manuscript on Maya dates, Lyle Campbell's bibliography of Mayan linguistics, Wallace Chafe on how FGL got into the study of Maya hieroglyphics, Michael Coe's report that Soviets were successful in using a computer to translate Maya hieroglyphs, R. David Drucker's comparison of Aztec and Maya calendars, Dieter Dutting on Maya hieroglyphs; transformational analysis of Yucatec.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Penobscot | Passamaquoddy | Maliseet | Mi'kmaq | Haudenosaunee | Abenaki | Lenape | Mohegan | Mohican | Zuni | Navajo | Tutelo | Wabanaki
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Micmac, Lenape, Mahican, Malecite
Language(s): English | Abenaki, Eastern
Date: 1908-1947
Extent: 27 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Penobscot language, history, and culture, and his preparation of his book Penobscot Man. This includes several folders of Speck's field notes, notes organized around specific topics (including data not used in Speck's published works), copies and drafts of lectures and essays, correspondence, etc. Topics include Penobscot social organization, calendar system, house furnishings, hunting morality, animal lore, religion, art, sayings, alphabet, counting and measuring, canoe-making, face-painting, texts with interlineal translations, and "Bird Lore of the Northern Indians" (a faculty public lecture at the University of Pennsylvania). Additionally, significant correspondence concerns the preparation, expenses, dissemination, and reception of his Penobscot publications. Other topics of correspondence include Ethel Gandy's monograph on Penobscot art; names of chiefs and their clans; "clown" performances outside of the southwest among the Penobscot, Iroquois [Haudenosaunee], Abenaki, and Delaware; place names; the relationship of Penobscot-Mohegan and Mahican; a comparison of Zuni-Navajo and Red Paint; Tutelo. There is a particularly large folder of Speck's miscellaneous Penobscot notes containing both a variety of notes and correspondence from Penobscot consultants as well as non-Native colleagues. These include letters from Roland E. Nelson (Needahbeh, Penobscot) concerning drum for exhibit; letters from Nelson, Franz Boas, John M. Cooper, William B. Goodwin, E. V. McCollum, and J. Dyneley Prince, all concerning Penobscot Man; Clifford P. Wilson concerning moosehair embroidery; Edward Reman concerning Norse influence on Penobscot; Carrie A. Lyford concerning moose-wool controversy and Ann Stimson's report; Ann Stimson, letter of thanks; Henry Noyes Otis concerning genealogy of Indians named Sias on Cape Cod (Speck marked this Penobscot); Princess Pretty Woman (Passamaquoddy) concerning her dress (apparently at the Penn Museum); Dorothy Ranco (Penobscot) concerning Princess Pretty Woman's dress; Roland W. Mann, concerning site of Indian occupancy according to Penobscot tradition; Ryuzo Torii, letter of introduction. Other miscellaneous items include a 5-page transcript of agreements between Indians of Nova Scotia and the English, August 15, 1749; 2 pages, transcript of agreement of July 13, 1727 (letter of transmittal, Lloyd Price to Miss MacDonald, September 24, 1936); Ann K. Stimson, Moose Wool and Climbing Powers of the American Mink; miscellaneous field notes on topics like songs, kinship, totem, medicine, and social units; and 4 pages of Penobscot words and their cultural use.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Chinook | Wasco-Wishram | Kathlamet | Klamath | Modoc | Maidu | Tzeltal | Miwok | Takelma | Tsimshian | Yokuts | Zuni
Date: 1952 and undated
Type:Text
Genre: Notes | Essays
Extent: 14 folders
Description: Several items relating to the Penutian language family have been identified in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. Of particular interest is Subseries VI. Penutian, including Mayan and Zoque, of Subcollection II, Series II. Research Notes. The contents of this subseries includes folders of materials under the following headings: Chinookan-Chinook, Wishram, Kathlamet; Klamath-Modoc; Maidu; Maya (Tzeltal); Miwok; Penutian; Sahaptin; Takelma; Tsimshian; Yokuts; and Zuni. There are also Penutian materials in Subcollection II, Series IV. Works by Others. These include Leonard Bloomfield's "Penutian" sketch; Giuseppe Francescato's masters thesis, "A Structural Comparison of the Californian Penutian" (1952); and Morris Swadesh's "Problems of Long-Range Comparison in Penutian." Researchers should also view the individual entries for distinct Penutian languages.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Lakota | Cheyenne | Apache, Lipan | Laguna | Creek | San Felipe | Ute | Zuni
Alternate forms: Sioux, Pueblo
Language(s): English
Date: 1879-1881
Extent: 0.25 linear feet, 27 photographs
Description: J. N. Choate was a local commercial photographer in Carlisle, Pennsylvania who advertised "Photographs of all the Indian Chiefs that have visited the Indian Training School at Carlisle Barracks, also of children in native and school costumes." Choate intended his images to document the benefits of civilization wrought by the Carlisle Indian School (founded 1879, closed 1918) on Native American students. His images include "before and after" shots of students in native dress (before) and school uniforms (after), the school band, students at work in the saddle shop and making shoes, etc. Choate also took a number of photographs of visiting Native leaders in traditional dress, including the Lakota chief Spotted Tail, and the Cheyennes Man on Cloud and Mad Wolf. One photograph depicts Carlisle School founder Richard Henry Pratt seated with Quaker supporters. Among the peoples represented are the Lakota, Laguna, Cheyenne, Creek, Lipan Apache, San Felipe Pueblo, Ute, and Zuni. The photographs in this collection are mounted on standard stock, and include 19 cabinet cards and 8 boudoir cards. Although some of the photographs are titled by hand and signed by Choate, most have printed backmarks with a few including lists of other available images and advertising pitches. These particular specimens were collected by anthropologist Frank Speck. See the finding aid for an itemized list. These images have also been digitized and are available online through the APS Digital Library.
Collection: Speck-Choate Photograph Collection (Mss.B.Sp3c)

Zuni
Language(s): English | Zuni
Date: 1992-1993
Extent: 3 sound tape reels (16 min.) : DIGITIZED
Description: Field recordings of the Zuni language made in New Mexico. Contains two autobiographical texts, word list, lexical items, and aphorisms. (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: Zuni language data (Mss.Rec.177)