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Arawak
Language(s): English | Arawak
Date: 1963
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Description: The Arawak materials in the Lounsbury Papers consist of word slips in Series II. Series I includes correspondence about the Arawak language family, prefixes, the translation of a Arawak lullaby, and William Sturtevant 's Arawak notebooks
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Atakapa | Biloxi | Catawba | Cherokee | Chitimacha | Choctaw | Chickasaw | Cocopah | Creek | Houma | Koasati | Lumbee | Natchez | Quapaw | Seminole | Shawnee | Timucua | Tunica | Tuscarora | Yuchi
Alternate forms: Cocopa, Coushatta
Language(s): English | Mobilian | Yuchi
Date: circa 1962-1983
Extent: 29 folders
Description: This entry is intended to encompass materials relating to James M. Crawford's interest in and study of Native North American languages. These items tend to be too general, too diffuse, or too vague in nature to easily fit under clear cultural or linguistic umbrellas. In Series III-D. Works by Crawford--Other, these items include "A Brief Account of the Indian Tribes of Northeast Georgia" (1962), a paper Crawford submitted in his Linguistics 170 class at Berkeley; Crawford's largely negative review of "Native Americans and Their Languages" by Roger Owen (1978); a typed copy of Crawford's "A Phonological Comparison of the Speech of Two Communities in California: East Bay and El Centro" (1964); typed drafts (with handwritten sections and penciled edits) of Crawford's "The Phonological Sequence ya in Words Pertaining to the Mouth in Southeastern and Other Indian Languages," which appeared in the volume “Studies in Southeastern Indian Languages,” which he edited (1975); and three folders pertaining to Crawford's other work on the edited volume “Studies in Southeastern Indian Languages,” including drafts, edits, notes, etc., of the preface and introduction Crawford wrote for the volume as well as exhaustive notes on bibliographic sources for several indigenous languages, including Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Natchez, Apalachee, Houma, Creek (Mukogean), Hitchiti, Seminole, Mobilian Jargon, Mikasuki, Alabama, Quapaw, Atakapa, Chitimacha, Timucua, Yuchi, Tuscarora, etc. (1970s). In Series IV-D. Research Notes & Notebooks—Other, items include a folder titled “Columbus Museum,” dated to July 1969, with research notes pertaining to Yuchi, Choctaw, Alabama-Koasati, Cherokee, etc., including the names and addresses of many potential language consultants for Yuchi, Shawnee, Catawba, Cherokee, etc., including some of the same people he visits in 1976 as described in “Mobilian Search—Notebook”; a folder labeled “Dialect Study (El Centro, East Bay),” with mostly handwritten notes and drafts pertaining to his "A Phonological Comparison of the Speech of Two Communities in California: East Bay and El Centro" (1964); “Haas Miscellany,” containing an Algonquian language chart attributed to Haas and two scraps of paper pertaining to her; “Miscellany,” containing notes on Maricopa, Digueno, Cocopa, Koasati, etc., as well as a plant specimen identified as Euphorbia chamaesyce; “Numerals from Indian Languages,” containing undated notes on numerals in Natchez, Muskogean, Hokan, Pomoan, Yukian, Wintun, Salinan, Esselen, Chumash, etc.; “Reconnaissance of Southeastern Indian Languages—Notebook,” a 1969 field notebook of a research trip mentioning numerous language consultants (Mrs. Rufus George, Yuchi and Cherokee, and Claude Medford, Creek?, prominent among them) and possible consultants, Choctaw, Seminole, Mikasuki, Cherokee, Lumbee, Creek, Chitimacha, Chickasaw, Shawnee, Yuchi, Tunica, Biloxi, Natchez, etc. people and languages, and commentary about relations between various groups, especially with Oklahoma groups [This item appears to be related to Crawford's research into the see also Mobilian materials]; “Mrs. Terrell—Notebook,” which contains a notebook of unidentified indigenous words elicited from consultants Mrs. Terrell and Mrs. Fletcher in April-May 1969; and “Unidentified,” containing sheets with a text in an unidentified indigenous language and its English translation. In Series VI. Course Material, there is a folder of materials relating to Crawford's coursework at Berkley, including “American Indian Languages--Linguistics 170 [1962]” as well as some Native North American material in an undated folder labeled “Seminars: 290a Theory; 290g American Indian Languages; Dialectology 216; 225; 130 Phonology—Notebook.” In Series II. Subject Files, there are materials relating to Crawford's research into to Mobilian, Cocopah, and Yuchi in “American Council of Learned Societies”; materials relating to his work in bilingual education under Title VII, particularly with the Yuchi in Oklahoma, in “Bilingual Education”; news clippings related to the work of Crawford and others in “Clippings”; records of payments to indigenous language consultants in “Informants' Receipts”; materials relating to Crawford's work with the Southeastern Indian Language Project via application materials in “National Science Foundation #1” and “National Science Foundation #2”; one folder of readers' reviews (pre-publication) and another folder of post-publication reviews of “Studies in Southeastern Indian Languages”; and a grant proposal to do field work to study Yuchi in Sapulpa, Oklahoma in “University of Georgia—Grant Proposal,” in which Crawford outlines not only his proposed study but some historical information about Yuchi people and language. Finally, Series I. Correspondence contains many exchanges about Crawford's work on Native North American languages. Most of this correspondence revolves around Crawford's submission of papers and articles to academic conferences and publishers. The most interesting items include a letter from Ilona May (Thomas) Keyaite, the daughter of a Cocopah consultant; letters and notes about 1735 drawings of Yuchi and Creek Indians in Georgia in a folder labelled “Sturtevant, William C.” [1977-1978]. This series also includes various letters and notes from the University of Georgia recognizing Crawford's professional accomplishments and awards, and a few letters documenting the difficult publication history of the volume on Southeastern Indian Languages.
Collection: James M. Crawford Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.66)

Maya | Mixe | Zuni | Tzeltal
Date: 1963-1995
Description: The Maya materials in the Lounsbury Papers are extensive. The correspondence in Series I includes a Motul (Mayan) dictionary, discussion about translating Maya glyphs and calendrical calculations, the Popol Vuh. Series II consists of articles and manuscripts from a project identified as "Maya kinship unfin. project." Much of this work is focused on interpreting Maya hieroglyphs. In Series VII there are a number of recordings of Yucatec Maya made in the 1960s focused on vocabulary. The correspondence, in Series I, includes a dictionary by Rene Acuna, Lloyd Anderson's Etymologies of Mayan calendrical and astronomical terms, Anthony Aveni's interpretation of Maya hieroglyphs, Brent Berlin's decipherment of Maya hieroglyphs, Gordon Brotherston's comments on FGL's manuscript on Maya dates, Lyle Campbell's bibliography of Mayan linguistics, Wallace Chafe on how FGL got into the study of Maya hieroglyphics, Michael Coe's report that Soviets were successful in using a computer to translate Maya hieroglyphs, R. David Drucker's comparison of Aztec and Maya calendars, Dieter Dutting on Maya hieroglyphs; transformational analysis of Yucatec.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Seminole
Language(s): Mikasuki | English | Muscogee
Date: 1930s-1982
Subject: Linguistics
Extent: 1.0 linear feet
Description: Mary Haas' Mikasuki language materials consist mostly of works by others, drafts and annotated versions of which can be found in Series 2 Subseries 'Mikasuki', along with fairly extensive notes by Haas on Mikasuki tone. In the 1930s Haas documented brief lexica with George Tiger and Ida Mary Bearhead, found in a field notebook containing many other languages in Series 2 Subseries 'Multiple languages'. In 1951, Mary Haas worked with William Sturtevant and speakers including Joseph Jumper to document Mikasuki, the originals of which are held at the Berkeley Language Center (Series 10). Further audio recordings of either Mikasuki or Muscogee were made at the Seminole Bilingual Project in 1973-1974 (a separate entry exists for this fieldwork, as well as for the much more extensive Muscogee materials, with which Mikasuki is often identified). There are also sizable lexical slip files from work by John David West and William Sturtevant in Series 9.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Muscogee
Alternate forms: Creek, Mvskoke, Muskogee
Language(s): English | Muscogee
Date: 1930s-1970s
Extent: 7 linear feet
Description: The Muscogee (Creek) materials in the Mary R. Haas Papers are extensive, with materials found in most sections of the collection. In Series I, see especially the correspondence with professional colleagues such as Franz Boas, Jack Martin, William Sturtevant, and others regarding the Muscogee language, as well as correspondence with her Muscogee-speaking consultants, such as James Hill and Watt Sam. Other relevant letters in Series 1 include a "Creek language" subject heading listed with the item. The most extensive amount of material can be found in the "Creek" section of Series 2. This section contains 10 boxes of material. Prominent materials in this section include Haas's original 22 field notebooks, containing vocabulary elicitation, stories, and accompanying notes, recorded in 1941 in Eufaula, Oklahoma, Nonnie Scott, Arthur E. Raiford, James Hill, Jim Marshall, Jim Bullet, Don Starr, Peter Ewing, John Toney, Tom Tiger, Wesley Tauyan, Ollie Tauyan, John Thompson, Tom Red, Johnson Late, and Dan Cooke, plus others only identified with initials; 6 notebooks by James Hill, writing in the Mvskoke writing system, containing stories; Victor Riste's 4 field notebooks from 1931, containing stories and elicited vocabulary with multiple consultants listed; various linguistic notes and other materials derived from the above-listed notebooks; pedagogical materials for Muscogee language learning; a range materials on Muscogee (Creek) history; and more. Series 3 contains a small number of items labelled "Creek." In Series 9, there is additional extensive files linguistic material in the form of lexicons and grammatical notes, as well as ethnographic notes. Some Creek terms are also included in files comparing it with other languages. Lastly, in Series 10, there is a brief "Creek Texts" audio recording from the 1970s, as well as "Creek Text and Conversation" with Watt Sam and Nancy Raven in 1931.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Muscogee | Seneca | Cayuga | Natchez | Pamunkey | Arawak | Yuchi | Shawnee
Alternate forms: Creek, Mvskoke, Muskogee
Language(s): Oneida | Cherokee | Muscogee | Arawak
Date: 1937-1962
Description: The Muscogee materials in the Lounsbury Papers consist primarily of linguistic materials, with some songs in Series VII. Of special interest are the field notebooks of Mary Haas in Series II. The correspondence, in Series I, Includes William Sturtevant's recording of Creek songs.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Creek
Language(s): English | Muscogee
Date: 1978-1986
Type:Text
Genre: Grammars | Essays
Description: The Muscogean materials in the Siebert Papers consist primarily of secondarty soureces located in Series IV and VII.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Natchez
Language(s): English
Date: 1941
Genre: Songs
Description: The Natchez materials in the Lounsbury Papers include four audio recordings of songs, includeing a Stomp Dance Song in Series VII. The correspondence, in Series I, includes a recording made by Mary Haas, William Sturtevan's work on Natchez social structure.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Seneca-Cayuga
Language(s): English
Date: 1962-1963
Type:Text
Genre: Reports
Extent: 7 pages
Description: The Seneca-Cayuga materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 1 items, listed under "Sturtevant, William": a report (7 p.) on: fieldwork in Oklahoma, including observations of ceremonies, for comparison with Iroquois (New York and Canada) rituals; museum and archival research; fieldwork in Ontario (Six Nations Reserve) and New York (Onandago, Tonawanda, Cattaraugus, and Allegany Reservation). Includes discussion of contacts between Oklahoma Seneca-Cayuga and eastern Iroquois.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Seneca
Language(s): English | Seneca
Date: 1958
Genre: Songs | Speeches
Extent: 2 sound tape reels (3 hr., 22 min.)
Description: A recording of ?ohkiiweeh, Chanters of the Dead, recorded at Newtown Longhouse, Cattaraugus Reservation, New York, by Cornelius Seneca, with notes by W.C. Sturtevant. Lead singer with drum: Rupert Scrogg (Tonawanda); Assistant singers: Everett Parker (Tonawanda), Harold Kittle (Cattaraugus); Head women; Louise Green, Louis (Eliz.) Young; Head men: Spencer Bennett, John Cook; Speaker: Gus Williams (Six Nations, resident at Newtown). This material is restricted due to its cultural sensitivity.
Collection: Seneca Chanters of the Dead (Mss.Rec.127)