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Atakapa | Biloxi | Catawba | Cherokee | Chitimacha | Choctaw | Chickasaw | Cocopah | Creek | Houma | Koasati | Natchez | Quapaw | Seminole | Shawnee | Timucua | Tunica | Tuscarora | Yuchi
Alternate forms: Cocopa, Coushatta
Language(s): English | Mobilian | Yuchi
Date: circa 1962-1983
Extent: 29 folders
Description: This entry is intended to encompass materials relating to James M. Crawford's interest in and study of Native North American languages. These items tend to be too general, too diffuse, or too vague in nature to easily fit under clear cultural or linguistic umbrellas. In Series III-D. Works by Crawford--Other, these items include "A Brief Account of the Indian Tribes of Northeast Georgia" (1962), a paper Crawford submitted in his Linguistics 170 class at Berkeley; Crawford's largely negative review of "Native Americans and Their Languages" by Roger Owen (1978); a typed copy of Crawford's "A Phonological Comparison of the Speech of Two Communities in California: East Bay and El Centro" (1964); typed drafts (with handwritten sections and penciled edits) of Crawford's "The Phonological Sequence ya in Words Pertaining to the Mouth in Southeastern and Other Indian Languages," which appeared in the volume “Studies in Southeastern Indian Languages,” which he edited (1975); and three folders pertaining to Crawford's other work on the edited volume “Studies in Southeastern Indian Languages,” including drafts, edits, notes, etc., of the preface and introduction Crawford wrote for the volume as well as exhaustive notes on bibliographic sources for several indigenous languages, including Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Natchez, Apalachee, Houma, Creek (Mukogean), Hitchiti, Seminole, Mobilian Jargon, Mikasuki, Alabama, Quapaw, Atakapa, Chitimacha, Timucua, Yuchi, Tuscarora, etc. (1970s). In Series IV-D. Research Notes & Notebooks—Other, items include a folder titled “Columbus Museum,” dated to July 1969, with research notes pertaining to Yuchi, Choctaw, Alabama-Koasati, Cherokee, etc., including the names and addresses of many potential language consultants for Yuchi, Shawnee, Catawba, Cherokee, etc., including some of the same people he visits in 1976 as described in “Mobilian Search—Notebook”; a folder labeled “Dialect Study (El Centro, East Bay),” with mostly handwritten notes and drafts pertaining to his "A Phonological Comparison of the Speech of Two Communities in California: East Bay and El Centro" (1964); “Haas Miscellany,” containing an Algonquian language chart attributed to Haas and two scraps of paper pertaining to her; “Miscellany,” containing notes on Maricopa, Digueno, Cocopa, Koasati, etc., as well as a plant specimen identified as Euphorbia chamaesyce; “Numerals from Indian Languages,” containing undated notes on numerals in Natchez, Muskogean, Hokan, Pomoan, Yukian, Wintun, Salinan, Esselen, Chumash, etc.; “Reconnaissance of Southeastern Indian Languages—Notebook,” a 1969 field notebook of a research trip mentioning numerous language consultants (Mrs. Rufus George, Yuchi and Cherokee, and Claude Medford, Creek?, prominent among them) and possible consultants, Choctaw, Seminole, Mikasuki, Cherokee, Lumbee, Creek, Chitimacha, Chickasaw, Shawnee, Yuchi, Tunica, Biloxi, Natchez, etc. people and languages, and commentary about relations between various groups, especially with Oklahoma groups [This item appears to be related to Crawford's research into the see also Mobilian materials]; “Mrs. Terrell—Notebook,” which contains a notebook of unidentified indigenous words elicited from consultants Mrs. Terrell and Mrs. Fletcher in April-May 1969; and “Unidentified,” containing sheets with a text in an unidentified indigenous language and its English translation. In Series VI. Course Material, there is a folder of materials relating to Crawford's coursework at Berkley, including “American Indian Languages--Linguistics 170 [1962]” as well as some Native North American material in an undated folder labeled “Seminars: 290a Theory; 290g American Indian Languages; Dialectology 216; 225; 130 Phonology—Notebook.” In Series II. Subject Files, there are materials relating to Crawford's research into to Mobilian, Cocopah, and Yuchi in “American Council of Learned Societies”; materials relating to his work in bilingual education under Title VII, particularly with the Yuchi in Oklahoma, in “Bilingual Education”; news clippings related to the work of Crawford and others in “Clippings”; records of payments to indigenous language consultants in “Informants' Receipts”; materials relating to Crawford's work with the Southeastern Indian Language Project via application materials in “National Science Foundation #1” and “National Science Foundation #2”; one folder of readers' reviews (pre-publication) and another folder of post-publication reviews of “Studies in Southeastern Indian Languages”; and a grant proposal to do field work to study Yuchi in Sapulpa, Oklahoma in “University of Georgia—Grant Proposal,” in which Crawford outlines not only his proposed study but some historical information about Yuchi people and language. Finally, Series I. Correspondence contains many exchanges about Crawford's work on Native North American languages. Most of this correspondence revolves around Crawford's submission of papers and articles to academic conferences and publishers. The most interesting items include a letter from Ilona May (Thomas) Keyaite, the daughter of a Cocopah consultant; letters and notes about 1735 drawings of Yuchi and Creek Indians in Georgia in a folder labelled “Sturtevant, William C.” [1977-1978]. This series also includes various letters and notes from the University of Georgia recognizing Crawford's professional accomplishments and awards, and a few letters documenting the difficult publication history of the volume on Southeastern Indian Languages.
Collection: James M. Crawford Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.66)

Cherokee | Apache | Caddo | Calusa | Ojibwe | Choctaw | Lenape | Gwich'in | Haudenosaunee | Inuit | Karankawa | Mattaponi | Meskwaki | Muscogee | Navajo | Onondaga | Pueblo | Seminole | Seneca | Shawnee | Oceti Sakowin | Slave | Timucua | Tuscarora | Tutelo | Wyandot
Alternate forms: Chippewa, Creek, Eskimo, Fox, Kuchin, Kutchin, Loucheux, Ojibwa, Ojibway, Mvskoke, Sauk, Huron, Wendat
Language(s): English
Date: 1939-1945; 1947-Circa 1961; 1951-1962;
Type:Text
Extent: Circa 350 volumes; 75 photographs; 75 newspaper clippings; 70 manuscripts
Description: Research on culture primarily related to Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, Cherokee Nation, and United Keetowah Band.
Collection: Miscellaneous items pertaining to the American Indian (Mss.497.3.G41)

Timucua | Yuchi
Language(s): English | Timucua
Date: circa 1975-1986
Type:Text
Genre: Notes | Drafts | Essays
Extent: 4 folders
Description: Materials relating to James Crawford's interest in and study of the Timucua language. Materials consist of three items. One folder contains drafts (with penciled edits), notes, etc. of Crawford's "On the Relationship Between Timucua and Muskogean" in Series III-D. Works by Crawford--Other. There is a folder labelled "Timucua" containing a 35-page Xeroxed word list dated to 1975 and "from a French source" according to R. Rankin in Series IV-D. Research Notes & Notebooks--Other. Finally, there are two folders containing typed and edited drafts of an essay published in “The Languages of North America: Historical and Comparative Assessment,” edited by Lyle Campbell and Marianne Mithun in "Timucua and Yuchi. Two Language Isolates of the Southeast" in Series III-B. Works by Crawford--Yuchi.
Collection: James M. Crawford Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.66)

Timucua | Tawasa
Language(s): Timucua | English | Tawasa
Date: 1982, undated
Type:Text
Extent: 0.1 linear feet
Description: Mary Haas' short Timucua file consists of two quite brief lexica (one comparing with Tawasa, Series 2 Subseries ‘Multiple Languages', and another of stems from previously published sources, Series 9), mentions within a folder containing histories and ethnographies of the Tunica (Series 2), and correspondence with Julian Granberry (Series 1).
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Timucua
Language(s): Timucua | English
Date: 2006
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 0.1 linear feet
Description: William Bright's own work on Timucua consisted of a page of verbal affixes interpreted from Granberry's "A Grammar and Dictionary of the Timucua Language" (pre-publication version). He also corresponded with Jack B. Martin on Francisco Pareja's grammar, with a translation and transliteration.
Collection: William O. Bright Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.142)

Atakapa | Biloxi | Catawba | Creek | Dakota | Maidu | Ofo | Shawnee | Timucua | Tunica | Tutelo | Yavapai | Yuchi
Alternate forms: Sioux
Language(s): English | Mobilian | Yuchi
Date: circa 1969-1987
Extent: 34 folders, 45 boxes, 4 magnetic tapes
Description: Materials relating to James Crawford's interest in and research on the Yuchi language. Items in Series III-B. Works by Crawford—Yuchi include "Biloxi, Ofo, and Yuchi" [1970], a paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Anthropological Society; "Reconnaissance Among Several Indian Groups in Mississippi, Oklahoma, Texas, and Louisiana" [1969], 2 folders containing typed and edited drafts of the narrative of a research trip including itinerary, names of people contacted, names of possible informants, and vocabulary items [See related materials regarding Crawford's research trips searching for data on the Mobilian trade language]; "Timucua and Yuchi: Two Language Isolates of the Southeast" [1977], 2 folders containing typed and edited drafts of an essay published in “The Languages of North America: Historical and Comparative Assessment,” edited by Lyle Campbell and Marianne Mithun; "Yuchi" [n.d.], a 7-page Xeroxed copy of the “Yuchi” entry, focusing on history and sources, in a volume on Southeastern Indian Languages; "Yuchi" in Handbook of North American Indians [1979], 2 folders of handwritten notes, typed drafts, and other research for the Yuchi entry in the Handbook; "Yuchi Phonology" [1970s], 3 folders of handwritten and typed notes and drafts of an essay on Yuchi and "Yuchi Text with Translation" [1972], containing handwritten and typed versions of a text and translation Crawford was preparing for publication. Items in Series IV-B. Research Notes & Notebooks—Yuchi include a word list and phrases in Yuchi and English in a folder labeled “Handouts” [n.d.]; 2 pages of unidentified linguistic notes and one page listing language consultants for Yuchi, Creek, and Shawnee in a folder labeled “Informants” [n.d.]; a typed copy and Xeroxed copy of a list of phrases demonstrating Yuchi negation in a folder labeled “Negation” [n.d.]; a folder of typed and handwritten “Notes on Yuchi Syntax” [1978]; "Possible Cognates to Yuchi in Siouan, Atakapa, Yava, Maider, etc." [1971-1977], which contains 9 full sheets and 2 slips of handwritten notes comparing Yuchi, Biloxi, Ofo, Catawba, Atakapa, Maidu, Yava, Wocco, Tutelo, etc.; "Some Possible Cognates Between Yuchi and Siouan and Between Yuchi and Tunica" [1976], containing a typed three-page chart comparing Yuchi, Dakota, and Biloxi (also with some Catawba examples); a folder of “Rough Sheets” containing handwritten Yuchi linguistic notes and charts; two five-inch floppy discs and a dot matrix print-out in a folder labeled “Yuchi Data” [1985]; and a folder of handwritten and typed Vocabularies and linguistic data in “Yuchi Vocabulary by Seymour Frank” [1970]. Nine field notebooks dating to 1970, 1971, and 1973 might be of particular interest. As well as linguistic information, Crawford also kept track of his itinerary, possible language consultants, etc. Crawford's interest in the Mobilian trade language is clear from the start, as he mentions Arzelia Langley and other consultants early on in #1 before focusing on Yuchi. Interviews with Maggie Poncho and Leonard Lavan are at the end of #4 after Crawford spent most of the summer working with Yuchi consultants, and his pursuit of Mobilian resumed in the summer of 1971 with #5, when Lavan was dying and no longer recognized Crawford, but Crawford worked with members of the Langley and Medford families and continued searching for more Mobilian speakers before again spending most of the summer working with Yuchi consultants in Sapulpa, Oklahoma. In the summer of 1973, Crawford worked on Yuchi in Sapulpa again before heading to Arizona and spending the rest of the summer working on Cocopa, particularly Cocopa baby talk. Language consultants mentioned include Frank Seymour, Nancy Wildcat, Addie George, Maggie Poncho, Leonard Lavan, Claude Medford, and many more potential consultants mentioned. A tenth notebook, dated to 1987 and largely empty, records another brief trip to Sapulpa to work again with Addie George and other Yuchi consultants. These notebooks, as well as a folder labeled “Notes” that is filled with miscellaneous handwritten and typed notes relating to Crawford's research trips, work on the Yuchi language, work with Yuchi people on bilingual education, and the like, all mention numerous Yuchi and other indigenous individuals and sometimes include genealogical and family history information as well. Finally, there are 45 boxes of word slips, Yuchi—English and English—Yuchi, in Series V. Card Files, and four magnetic tapes of Yuchi linguistic materials dating from 1979 to 1986 in Series IV-B, Research Notes & Notebooks—Yuchi (an Oversized series). See also: the Mobilian entry and the Linguistics entry for the Crawford Papers for related materials, including more field notes from Crawford's visits to Sapulpa and with other Yuchi consultants and materials relating to Crawford's work with bilingual education with Yuchis in Oklahoma, including a booklet titled “Euchee Mission Reunion” in “Sapulpa, Oklahoma Public Schools” in Series II. Subject Files. Finally, Series I. Correspondence contains correspondence from Raymond Fogelson with reader reports from William Sturtevant and Lew Ballard on Crawford's Yuchi entry for the Handbook of North American Indians, and Crawford's reply asking that the entry be reassigned due the years that have passed since he submitted the essay and the considerable edits required to revise the entry for and correspondence from William Sturtevant regarding attempts by Kristian Hvidt (librarian of the Danish parliament) to learn more about 1735 Georgia drawings by Baron Philipp Georg von Reck, a commissaire to the Salzburgers who settled at Ebenezer, along with Crawford's subsequent notes and drafts of a brief essay on the history and nature of the images, stressing the Yuchi and Creek elements.
Collection: James M. Crawford Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.66)