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Alabama | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Creek | Seminole | Apalachee | Koasati
Alternate forms: Alibamu, Coushatta
Date: 1934-1982
Type:Text
Extent: 0.5 linear feet
Description: Mary Haas worked for a short period to document Alabama with several speakers on in the 1930s. The field notebook is in Series 2 Subseries ‘Multiple Languages' and includes comparisons with Koasati and Choctaw. Around 585 lexical items were obtained from this fieldwork, from which lexical slip files (Series 9) are derived. Haas also utilized John R. Swanton's dictionary of Alabama, and Alabama forms part of extensive Muskogean language comparisons, mostly in Series 2. There is also brief correspondence.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Apalachee
Language(s): Apalachee | English
Date: undated
Type:Text
Extent: 0.1 linear feet
Description: The Apalachee language is only attested in a letter in Spanish to King Charles II of Spain in 1688. Haas translated the document and added comparisons to other Muskogean languages, the results of which are in Series 2 (some unfortunately heavily damaged by mold) alongside ethnographic notes copied from other sources and comparisons to prove Apalachee's place within the Muskogean language family. In addition to the dedicated subseries in Series 2, see Subseries ‘Multiple Languages', Series 9, and correspondence.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Chickasaw | Choctaw | Creek | Seminole | Apalachee | Alabama | Koasati | Natchez | Tunica | Atakapa | Chitimacha
Alternate forms: Coushatta
Date: 1936, undated
Type:Text
Extent: 0.5 linear feet
Description: Mary Haas did not conduct her own fieldwork on Chitimacha, but amassed sizeable lexica from Morris Swadesh, mostly used for comparisons with Muskogean languages and linguistic isolates under the “Gulf” hypothesis. One especially large instance of comparison involving Chitimacha is an 1821-word long English-Natchez-Chitimacha word list, partially filled, in Series 2 Subseries Natchez. The majority of the comparative lexica are slip files, in Series 9. Besides this, of particular interest is sheet music of several Chitimacha songs, untitled, from an unknown source, in Series 2 Subseries Chitimacha. Haas also published an article on clans and kinship terminology with Natchez comparisons, notes and discussions of which are in Series 4 Subseries 3.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Chickasaw | Choctaw | Creek | Seminole | Apalachee | Alabama | Koasati
Alternate forms: Alibamu, Coushatta
Date: 1937-1981
Type:Text
Extent: 0.5 linear feet
Description: Haas' Choctaw file is mostly the product of fieldwork among the Tunica of Louisiana during the 1930s, where Haas interviewed mother tongue speakers of Choctaw and her Tunica consultant Sesostrie Youchigant, and in Oklahoma during her Creek fieldtrips. Products of these first appear in the field notebooks and genealogy charts of Series 2 Subseries Choctaw and Tunica and are summarized in card files in Series 9. Strikingly, over 40 years elapsed between Haas' first Choctaw field notebook (Series 2) and her second. Choctaw featured heavily in Haas' comparison and reconstruction of Proto-Muskogean, regularly distributed throughout, particularly in Koasati materials. Comparative work also involved significant phonological and morphological analysis.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Natchez | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Creek | Seminole | Apalachee | Alabama | Koasati | Tunica | Atakapa | Chitimacha
Alternate forms: Coushatta
Date: ca.1934-1960s
Type:Text
Extent: 5 linear feet
Description: Mary Haas' Natchez file is one of her largest, and relatively little was published from it during her lifetime. She conducted fieldwork with Watt Sam, Nancy Raven and Peggy Leaf, captured in twelve field notebooks in Series 2. A large volume of texts were elicited here and later typeset, with different versions also present in Series 2. Particularly extensive is Haas' set of Natchez lexical slips, amounting to 7 boxes (likely over 10,000 slips), including (in addition to full alphabetizations) grammatical analyses and comparisons with other languages. Haas' fieldwork on Natchez and other neighboring languages was used as partial evidence for the Gulf hypothesis, for which comparisons are abundant also in Series 9. Additionally, Haas corresponded with a large number of linguists (Series 1).
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Chickasaw | Choctaw | Creek | Seminole | Apalachee | Alabama | Coushatta | Natchez | Tunica | Atakapa | Chitimacha
Date: 1930s-1996
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 2 linear feet
Description: A considerable amount of Haas' research from the 1950s onwards involved identifying language family relationships and constructing proto-languages. Comparisons, both lexical and phonological, between Muskogean and hypothesized Gulf languages and their proto-forms are abundant especially throughout Series 2 and Series 9. Haas made annotations to others' publications, created bibliographies, and developed family trees and lexica of both Proto-Muskogean and Proto-Golf and a wide variety of Muskogean languages, including several lexica from multiple historical sources in Series 9. Examples of the above are to be found across much of the collection, often in folders of specific Muskogean and Gulf languages. See individual cultures and languages for specifics.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Tunica | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Creek | Seminole | Apalachee | Alabama | Koasati | Natchez | Atakapa | Chitimacha
Alternate forms: Coushatta
Date: ca.1933-1960s
Extent: 3 linear feet
Description: Mary Haas conducted extensive fieldwork on Tunica with last speaker Sesostrie Youchigant, subsequently publishing a grammar as her PhD dissertation, and later texts and a dictionary. Fourteen field notebooks can be found in the dedicated subseries in Series 2, along with abundant grammatical and lexical notes and sheet music. Tunica was an integral part of Haas' comparative work on the Gulf hypothesis, so extensive comparisons can be found, especially in the lexical slip files of Series 9. Haas' Tunica work also contains more ethnographic notes than most of her files. Photographs of Sesostrie Youchigant are present in Series 11 and can be viewed at the Digital Library.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)