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Naskapi | Yurok
Language(s): English
Date: 1918-1945 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 10 items
Description: A variety of materials relating to Speck's study of diverse Algonquian peoples, cultures, and languages. Includes his "Remnants of the Eastern Indian Tribes," a brief discussion of location of New England Algonquians; his favorable review of John M. Cooper, "Snares, Deadfalls, and other Traps of Northern Algonquians and Northern Athapascans" [Printed, Speck (1939).]; a "Table of Double Curve Motif," charting techniques and variations of motifs of various Northwestern, Iroquoian, and central Algonquian peoples; a manuscript draft and additions of "Terms of relationship and the family territorial band among the Northeastern Algonquins," [Printed, Speck (1918).]; letters from Alanson Skinner challenging Speck's ethnic position of the Southeastern Algonquian on meaning of Eskimo-type artifacts found in Algonquian site in New York (State); materials from Eva L. Butler, including two pamphlets containing transcriptions of historical letters, principally from the Connecticut State Library--"Colonial Letters of our Ancestors" and "Letters of the Indians"--and "Botany and ethnozoology of the New England Indians," a bibliography of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century sources for ethnobotantical and ethnozoological references; letters from Edward Sapir concerning Speck (1918a), particularly Yurok comparisons, his excitement about reduction of language stocks, and possible typographical errors; and letters from Carl F. Voegelen concerning the usefulness of Speck's Naskapi material for comparative study of Algonquian languages and seeking an article on process by which Algonquian languages become extinct.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Biloxi | Ofo | Tunica
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1970-1979 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 3 folders
Description: Materials relating to James Crawford's interest in the Biloxi and Ofo languages. Materials consist of three folders. There is an undated Biloxi-Ofo bibliography in Series IV-D. Research Notes & Notebooks--Other; "Biloxi, Ofo, and Yuchi" [1970], a paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Anthropological Society in Series III-B. Works by Crawford--Yuchi; and a folder of drafts, page proofs, and a tear sheet of James M. Crawford's joint review in "American Anthropologist" of "The Caddoan, Iroquoian, and Siouan Languages" by Wallace L. Chafe, "A Grammar of Biloxi" by Paula Ferris Einaudi, "A Grammar of Pawnee" by Douglas R. Parks, and "Wichita Grammar" by David S. Rood, located in Series III-D. Works by Crawford--Other.
Collection: James M. Crawford Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.66)

Blackfoot
Alternate forms: Siksika
Language(s): English
Date: 1943
Type:Text
Genre: Reviews
Extent: 3 pages
Description: Review of Oscar Lewis, "The Effects of White Contact upon Blackfoot Culture" submitted to American Sociological Review. Unpublished.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Atakapa | Biloxi | Catawba | Cherokee | Chitimacha | Choctaw | Chickasaw | Cocopah | Creek | Houma | Koasati | Natchez | Quapaw | Seminole | Shawnee | Timucua | Tunica | Tuscarora | Yuchi
Alternate forms: Cocopa, Coushatta
Language(s): English | Mobilian | Yuchi
Date: circa 1962-1983
Extent: 29 folders
Description: This entry is intended to encompass materials relating to James M. Crawford's interest in and study of Native North American languages. These items tend to be too general, too diffuse, or too vague in nature to easily fit under clear cultural or linguistic umbrellas. In Series III-D. Works by Crawford--Other, these items include "A Brief Account of the Indian Tribes of Northeast Georgia" (1962), a paper Crawford submitted in his Linguistics 170 class at Berkeley; Crawford's largely negative review of "Native Americans and Their Languages" by Roger Owen (1978); a typed copy of Crawford's "A Phonological Comparison of the Speech of Two Communities in California: East Bay and El Centro" (1964); typed drafts (with handwritten sections and penciled edits) of Crawford's "The Phonological Sequence ya in Words Pertaining to the Mouth in Southeastern and Other Indian Languages," which appeared in the volume “Studies in Southeastern Indian Languages,” which he edited (1975); and three folders pertaining to Crawford's other work on the edited volume “Studies in Southeastern Indian Languages,” including drafts, edits, notes, etc., of the preface and introduction Crawford wrote for the volume as well as exhaustive notes on bibliographic sources for several indigenous languages, including Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Natchez, Apalachee, Houma, Creek (Mukogean), Hitchiti, Seminole, Mobilian Jargon, Mikasuki, Alabama, Quapaw, Atakapa, Chitimacha, Timucua, Yuchi, Tuscarora, etc. (1970s). In Series IV-D. Research Notes & Notebooks—Other, items include a folder titled “Columbus Museum,” dated to July 1969, with research notes pertaining to Yuchi, Choctaw, Alabama-Koasati, Cherokee, etc., including the names and addresses of many potential language consultants for Yuchi, Shawnee, Catawba, Cherokee, etc., including some of the same people he visits in 1976 as described in “Mobilian Search—Notebook”; a folder labeled “Dialect Study (El Centro, East Bay),” with mostly handwritten notes and drafts pertaining to his "A Phonological Comparison of the Speech of Two Communities in California: East Bay and El Centro" (1964); “Haas Miscellany,” containing an Algonquian language chart attributed to Haas and two scraps of paper pertaining to her; “Miscellany,” containing notes on Maricopa, Digueno, Cocopa, Koasati, etc., as well as a plant specimen identified as Euphorbia chamaesyce; “Numerals from Indian Languages,” containing undated notes on numerals in Natchez, Muskogean, Hokan, Pomoan, Yukian, Wintun, Salinan, Esselen, Chumash, etc.; “Reconnaissance of Southeastern Indian Languages—Notebook,” a 1969 field notebook of a research trip mentioning numerous language consultants (Mrs. Rufus George, Yuchi and Cherokee, and Claude Medford, Creek?, prominent among them) and possible consultants, Choctaw, Seminole, Mikasuki, Cherokee, Lumbee, Creek, Chitimacha, Chickasaw, Shawnee, Yuchi, Tunica, Biloxi, Natchez, etc. people and languages, and commentary about relations between various groups, especially with Oklahoma groups [This item appears to be related to Crawford's research into the see also Mobilian materials]; “Mrs. Terrell—Notebook,” which contains a notebook of unidentified indigenous words elicited from consultants Mrs. Terrell and Mrs. Fletcher in April-May 1969; and “Unidentified,” containing sheets with a text in an unidentified indigenous language and its English translation. In Series VI. Course Material, there is a folder of materials relating to Crawford's coursework at Berkley, including “American Indian Languages--Linguistics 170 [1962]” as well as some Native North American material in an undated folder labeled “Seminars: 290a Theory; 290g American Indian Languages; Dialectology 216; 225; 130 Phonology—Notebook.” In Series II. Subject Files, there are materials relating to Crawford's research into to Mobilian, Cocopah, and Yuchi in “American Council of Learned Societies”; materials relating to his work in bilingual education under Title VII, particularly with the Yuchi in Oklahoma, in “Bilingual Education”; news clippings related to the work of Crawford and others in “Clippings”; records of payments to indigenous language consultants in “Informants' Receipts”; materials relating to Crawford's work with the Southeastern Indian Language Project via application materials in “National Science Foundation #1” and “National Science Foundation #2”; one folder of readers' reviews (pre-publication) and another folder of post-publication reviews of “Studies in Southeastern Indian Languages”; and a grant proposal to do field work to study Yuchi in Sapulpa, Oklahoma in “University of Georgia—Grant Proposal,” in which Crawford outlines not only his proposed study but some historical information about Yuchi people and language. Finally, Series I. Correspondence contains many exchanges about Crawford's work on Native North American languages. Most of this correspondence revolves around Crawford's submission of papers and articles to academic conferences and publishers. The most interesting items include a letter from Ilona May (Thomas) Keyaite, the daughter of a Cocopah consultant; letters and notes about 1735 drawings of Yuchi and Creek Indians in Georgia in a folder labelled “Sturtevant, William C.” [1977-1978]. This series also includes various letters and notes from the University of Georgia recognizing Crawford's professional accomplishments and awards, and a few letters documenting the difficult publication history of the volume on Southeastern Indian Languages.
Collection: James M. Crawford Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.66)

Houma
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1979
Type:Text
Genre: Reviews | Essays | Drafts
Extent: 1 folder
Description: This item consists of two copies--one with pencilled edits and one clean--of James M. Crawford's article on the Houma in the "Dictionary of Indian Tribes of the Americas" [1979]. Located in Series III-D. Works by Crawford--Other.
Collection: James M. Crawford Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.66)

Kiliwa
Language(s): English | Kiliwa
Date: circa 1958
Type:Text
Extent: 4 folders, 1 box
Description: Materials relating to James M. Crawford's interest in and study of the Kiliwa language. Items include card-sized paper slips, Kiliwa-English and English-Kiliwa, with pencilled notes, in Series V. drafts (with edits), handwritten notes, and page proofs of Crawford's review of "Kiliwa Dictionary" by Mauricio J. Mixco [1986] in Series III-D. Works by Crawford--Other; and a 1958 Kiliwa Word List in Series IV-D. Research Notes & Notebooks--Other, which consists of five pages of typed words in English (sometimes also Spanish) with handwritten Kiliwa equivalents. The language consultant was Rufino Uchurte, aged 63, resident of Arroyo Leon, half Paipai and half Kiliwa, and speaker of both languages. Recorder was anthropologist and linguist Judith Joël Hicks. Series I. Correspondence also contains a postcard from Dwight Good with a brief query about an unknown people compared to Kiliwa.
Collection: James M. Crawford Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.66)

Ktunaxa
Alternate forms: Kootenai, Kootenay, Kutenai
Language(s): English | Kutenai
Date: Undated
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Genre: Essays | Reviews
Extent: 1 folder
Description: The Ktunaxa materials in the Franz Boas Professional Papers consist of 1 folder: "Review of Chamberlain's Kootenai language manuscript."
Collection: Franz Boas Personal and Professional Papers (Mss.B.B61p)

Cocopah | Kumeyaay | Maricopa | Yavapai
Alternate forms: Cocopa, Diegueño, Kumiai
Date: circa 1964-1978
Type:Text
Extent: 4 folders
Description: Materials relating to James M. Crawford's interest in and study of the Kumiai (formerly Diegueño) language. Items include 2 typed drafts (with pencilled edits) and page proofs of Crawford's review of "A Grammar of Diegueño Nominals" by Larry Paul Gorbet [1978]; and handwritten and typed drafts (with penned edits) and page proofs of Crawford's lengthy and positive review in Lingua of "A Grammar of Diegueño, the Mesa Grande Dialect" by Margaret Langdon [1972]. Both folders containing these review materials are located in Series III-D. Works by Crawford--Other. There is also an undated notebook titled "Diegueño" in Series IV-D. Research Notes & Notebooks--Other, which contains a single half-sheet with a few handwritten lingustic notes. Finally, there are typed drafts, handwritten notes, and some photocopied "homework exercises" in Kumiai in a folder labeled "Proto-Yuman: Reconstructed from Cocopa, Diegueño, Maricopa, and Yavapai" [Jan. 1964] in Series III-C. Works by Crawford--Yuman.
Collection: James M. Crawford Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.66)

Cree | Menominee | Meskwaki | Miami | Ojibwe | Penobscot | Shawnee
Alternate forms: Menomini
Date: 1964-1975
Type:Text
Description: The Menomini materials in the Siebert Papers consist primarily of secondary sources in Series IV and VII. Siebert's work on the Menomini can be found in a notebook in Series V that contains material related to Cree, Ojibwa, and Penobscot. Vocabulary lists of insects, birds, animals, fish, trees, berries, plants, and relationships.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Atakapa | Biloxi | Catawba | Cherokee | Chickasaw | Chitimacha | Creek | Choctaw | Houma | Koasati | Natchez | Ojibwe | Quapaw | Shawnee | Tunica | Tuscarora | Yuchi
Alternate forms: Ojibwa
Language(s): Choctaw | English | Mobilian
Date: circa 1969-1981
Type:Text
Extent: 23 folders
Description: These materials relate to James M. Crawford's interest in and research on the Mobilian trade language, particularly research and writing relating to his prize-winning book, The Mobilian Trade Language. The bulk of Mobilian materials in the Crawford papers are located in Series III-D. Works by Crawford—Other. These include 11 folders containing numerous typed drafts of the manuscript, with copious handwritten edits, some edits typed on cards and attached the relevant page, and page proofs. There are also 6 folders of research notes containing Crawford's notes on secondary sources from the fields of history, anthropology and linguistics; notes on primary documentary sources; typed early drafts of sections of the manuscript; linguistic notes and charts; typed and handwritten transcriptions from both primary and secondary sources; timelines; outlines; bibliographic lists; a bibliography of Mary Haas; a copy of Mary Haas' “What is Mobilian?”; and several loose-page pages of handwritten text apparently from the Bible translated into an indigenous language. A significant quantity of the research material is in French, transcribed or copied from French sources. In the same series are also two copies--one with penciled edits and one clean--of Crawford's “Mobile” essay in the "Dictionary of Indian Tribes of the Americas" [1979]. In Series IV-D. Research Notes & Notebooks—Other, there is a folder titled "Mobilian Forms Collected August 27, 1970 from Leonard Lavan by J.M. Crawford Near Elton, Louisiana" containing 8 pages of notes and Vocabularies, mostly typed. Other consultants mentioned (page 7) are Daisy Sickey at Elton, Louisiana, and Maggie Poncho (Alabama) and Phoebie Celestine (Koasati) interviewed at the Alabama-Coushatta Reservation in Texas, also in August 1970; and a folder titled “Mobilian Search—Notebook,” containing one of Crawford's field notebooks in which he kept a record of a research trip in August-September, 1976 to Louisiana, Mississippi, and Oklahoma in search of Mobilian words. Crawford took 36 pages of detailed notes regarding distances traveled; costs of hotels, camp grounds, meals, and other expenses; conversations with Native people about their own knowledge of languages and possible leads on Mobilian; addresses and phone numbers of other potential consultants; his conversations with people in Oklahoma and elsewhere about Title IV, bilingual language programs, the preparation of education materials for that purpose, grants, etc.; and other events of the trip such as his malfunctioning tape recorder (a serious problem because he needed to play the tape of Arzelie Langley speaking Mobilian) and his Volkswagen camper breaking down. He also included notes on words and linguistics he gathered, reminders to send Xeroxed copies of linguistic and ethnographic information (Swanton's Houma word list, Chitimacha materials in Freeman's APS list, Yuchi materials, etc.) back to people he'd met, sketch maps to help find the homes of potential consultants, what he spent on baskets and from whom he purchased, other ethnographic data he picked up, etc. Native individuals mentioned include Claude Medford, Ernest Sickey, Burley Celestine, Della Celestine, Jim Courteneaux, Edward Sylestine, Rosaline Langley Medford, Levi Fields, Sanville Johnson, Anderson Lewis, Clyde Jackson, Tom Dion, Annie Dion, Marie Dion/Dean, Rose Dean, Lillie Lewis, Jessie Lewis, Alvin and Freda Revere, Bill Crew, Lawrence Billiot, Alvin Cearley, Ken York, Barry Jim, and more. Native groups and languages mentioned include Houma, Natchez, Cherokee, Creek, Koasati, Choctaw, Chitimacha, Tunica, Biloxi, Yuchi, Chickasaw, Shawnee, etc. In other series, there is a file of largely positive reviews of The Mobilian Trade Language in Series II. Subject Files, and one box of card-sized paper slips, Mobilian-English and English-Mobilian, with penciled notes, in Series V. Card Files. Related materials include the folders titled “Columbus Museum” and “Reconnaissance of Southeastern Indian Languages—Notebook,” both of which also document Crawford's search for Mobilian, in Series IV-D. Research Notes & Notebooks—Other; and grant application materials that describe and give background for the project and give a narrative of his 1976 research trip (which greatly clarifies the notebook of the same trip) in “American Council of Learned Societies” in Series II. Subject Files. Finally, in Series I. Correspondence, there is a letter from Crawford to Miles Richardson submitting the manuscript for consideration for the James Mooney Award, which it went on to win (1976) and a marketing letter to the General L. Kemper Williams Prize committee from the University of Tennessee Press.
Collection: James M. Crawford Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.66)