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Chinook
Language(s): Chinook | Kathlamet | English
Date: ca.1976-1994
Type:Text
Extent: 0.1 linear feet
Description: Daythal Kendall's Chinookan languages file is entirely works collected from others, most notably Dell Hymes, Samuel Johnson and Marie-Lucie Tarpent, the latter of which includes a paper with over 200 comparisons between Chinook and Tsimshian languages. There are also some Chinook Jargon Essays scattered throughout the collection, mostly by Samuel Johnson. These can mostly be found in Series 5.
Collection: Daythal L. Kendall Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.148)

Delaware | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Lenape, Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1991
Contributor: Lowe, Joan L.
Type:Text
Genre: Theses
Extent: 86 pages
Description: This senior thesis for honors in American History was submitted to the University of Pennsylvania in 1991. Lowe's advisors were Anthony F. C. Wallace and Edward C. Carter III. The author was inspired by Peggy Reeves Sanday and Carroll Smith-Rosenberg to develop a feminist perspective in her study of history, and approaches the "Delaware as women" trope accordingly to argue that Delawares adopted a "European gender discourse" that "contributed to the erosion of Delaware Indian culture." Lowe focuses on laying out the background of the "Delaware as women"problem; analyzing morality (particular sexual mores), gender roles, and the use of the word "petticoats" in the context of Delaware culture; the position of the Delawares in relation to the Six Nation; land disputes and agreements; the fur trade; religion, particularly Moravian missionaries and native prophets; and politics. Gift of Joan L. Lowe.
Collection: Colonial gender discourse and the Delaware Indians; 1991 (Mss.970.3.L948c)

Delaware | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Lenape, Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1936-1959
Type:Text
Extent: 9 items
Description: Materials relating to Paul A. W. Wallace's research and writing on topics in Delaware history and culture. Items include drafts, with corrections, of a 1952 paper on the "Delawares-as-Women Problem" read at the Iroquois Conference, Red House; Wallace's undated report on a visit with Chief Joseph Montour (Delaware) at the Six Nations Reserve, Ontario; three copies of a document titled "We are the Six Nations" regarding relations between the Delawares and Haudenosaunee; a draft of Wallace's article "Last King of the Delawares " on Chief Joseph Montour, which discusses relations between the Delawares and Haudenosaunee as well as events in Montour's life; Wallace's correspondence with Montour; Wallace's correspondence with Nicholas B. Wainwright regarding the Delawares-as-women problem; Wallace's correspondence with E. Gordon Alderfer regarding a proposed literary history of Pennsylvania and the desirability of including Indian oral literature, and the validity of Walam Olum; Wallace's correspondence with John C. Ewers regarding the true national identity of the Indian in "Portrait of a Delaware Indian" by Charles B. J. Fevret de St. Memin; and three pages by John Witthoft on the age and origin of Polly Heckewelder's "Indian doll."
Collection: Paul A. W. Wallace Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.64b)

Haudenosaunee | Onondaga | Mohawk | Tuscarora | Oneida | Cayuga | Seneca
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English | Cayuga
Date: 1962
Contributor: Myers, Merlin G.
Type:Text
Extent: 315 pages
Description: This dissertation by anthropologist Merlin G. Myers was submitted to Cambridge University in 1962. The author focuses on the economic features and composition of household groups, political and ritual aspects of matrilineal descent, kinship and marriage, and the effects of these on the household group. He pays particular attention to variables relating to age, gender, and relations between generations. The study is based on Myers' field research in 1956-1958, during which he (accompanied by his wife, whose associations with Longhouse women led to some valuable insights) worked in both English and halting Cayuga. Among other sources, Myers had access to unpublished field notes of William N. Fenton, who also introduced Myers to members of the Six Nations Reserve. This item was a gift of William N. Fenton. Published by the University of Nebraska Press in 2006.
Collection: Household structure among the Longhouse Iroquois of the Six Nations Reserve (Mss.970.3.M99)