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Acoma
Language(s): English | Keres, Western
Date: 1957-1963, 1969
Type:Text
Extent: 261 pages
Description: The Acoma materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 2 items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Irvine Davis and Joel Maring.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Catawba | Cherokee | Tutelo
Language(s): English | Catawba | Tutelo
Date: 1716; 1803; 1951-1997
Extent: 7 boxes
Description: The Catawba materials in the Frank Siebert Papers are primarily concentrated in Series II. These consist of copies of secondary sources such as an "Indian Vocabulary from Fort Christanna, 1716, Catawba census notes, 1830-1929, land claim agreements, and a dictionary of Place names in South Carolina. Original materials include hundreds of pages of Siebert's FIeld notes and a Catawba vocabulary / dictionary done with Wes Taukchiray.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Dakota | Lakota
Alternate forms: Dakhota, Lakhota, Santee, Sioux, Teton, Yankton
Language(s): Dakota | English | Lakota
Date: 1838-1938 (bulk 1930s)
Type:Text
Extent: 7500+ pages, 3300+ slips; 2 notebooks
Description: The Dakota and Lakota materials in the ACLS collection consist of a very large and diverse set of materials, and are located in the "Dakota" section of the finding aid, which provides a detailed listing of all contents. The vast majority of these materials were composed and assembled by Ella Deloria during the 1930s, both recorded from contemporary speakers and from various historical manuscript sources, which were sent to Franz Boas. The bulk of Deloria's materials are stories and speeches in typewritten manuscript form, with a transcription in the original language, followed by a literal word-for-word translation, then a free translation in English, and a section of footnotes commenting upon the original text and translation decisions. Some of her manuscripts occasionally lack one or more of these sections. These texts cover a wide range of topics, from traditional narratives, historical accounts, autobiographical stories, descriptions of games, customs, ceremonies, etc., and speeches, often concerning political affairs and economic conditions from the late-19th century to the 1930s. Names of numerous speakers are also given in the manuscripts themselves. Some of these materials were published, but most were not. Note that Deloria identifies the language recorded by using the terms "Teton" for Lakota language, and "Santee" and "Yankton" to indicate Eastern and Western dialects of Dakota language. The collection also includes a much smaller amount of material by Boas and others, primarily consisting of linguistics notes and musical analysis. A full list of places where the material was recorded has not yet been assembled.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Abenaki | Cherokee | Lenape | Mohawk | Munsee | Onondaga | Penobscot
Alternate forms: Lenape, Lenni-Lenape
Language(s): English | Delaware | Cree | Munsee | Cherokee | Onondaga
Date: 1930-1941; 1981-1983
Description: The Delaware materials in the Siebert collection can be found in Series IV, V, VII. Most of the materials are from secondary sources. Of interest is geographic diversity of Delaware materials ranging from Oklahoma to the Six Nations' reserve in Ontario to Moraviantown. There are also a number of Munsee recordings in Series XII.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Hopi
Language(s): English | Hopi
Date: 1960, 1963, 1965-1970, 1973, 1976-1978, 1988-1989, 1994, 2006
Extent: 1286 pages, 11 photographs
Description: The Hopi materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 18 items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Black, Cameron, Hodge, Jeanne, Kealiinohomoku, Masayesva, McChesney, Schepers, Seaman, Swanson, and Voegelin. Some of these materials may be restricted due to cultural sensitvity or privacy considerations.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

A'wa'etłala | K'ómoks | Da'naxda'xw | Dzawada'enuxw | Gopinuxw | Gusgimukw | Gwa'sala | Gwatsinuxw | Gwawa'enuxw | Kwakwaka'wakw | Kwagu'ł | Kwikwasutinuxw | Ławitsis | Ma'a̱mtagila | Mamalilikala | Nak'waxda'xw | Namgis | Tłatłasikwala | Wiwekam | Wiweqayi | Ndau | Zulu | Heiltsuk
Alternate forms: Gwasilla, Gwawaenuk, K'omoks, Koskimo, Kwakiutl, Kwicksutaineuk, Laich-kwil-tach, Lekwiltok, Nakoaktok, Nakwoktak, Nimpkish, Quatsino, Tanakteuk, Tlowitsis, Tsawataineuk, Weiwaikai, Weiwaikum
Date: 1893-1951
Extent: Approx. 10,000 loose pages, 10 notebooks, 7000+ cards, 10+ maps
Description: The Kwakwaka'wakw materials in the ACLS collection are located predominantly in the "Kwakiutl" section of the finding aid, which contains a full listing of all materials (other relevant sections are "Northwest Coast", "Bella Bella (Heitsuk)", and item AfBnd.4 in "Non-American and non-linguistic material"). Some of the larger individual sets of materials listed within this section also have their own specific tables of contents (available upon request) detailing their often highly diverse contents. Overall, the vast majority of the material is made of of 1) manuscripts sent to Boas by George Hunt from the 1890s to the 1930s, frequently in both Kwak'wala and English, covering a very broad range of Kwakwaka'wakw history, culture, languages, customs, and traditions; and 2) field work materials recorded by Boas and Boas' own analyses of material sent by Hunt, covering a similar range of topics. Additional materials by other individuals focus especially on linguistic and ethnographic matters. Also see the "Kwakiutl materials, Franz Boas Papers," for information on the correspondence between Boas and Hunt, which gives additional context to the materials in the ACLS collection.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Oneida | Haudenosaunee | Potawatomi | Mahican | Menominee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Date: 1938-1996
Description: The Oneida materials in the Lounsbury Papers include photographs in Series I. Series II contains plays and songs from the WPA Oneida Language Project and the Workers Alliance of the Oneida Indian Council. Also of interest are an Oneida dictionary by Mercy Doxtator, et al., a field notebook by Martin Joos, and Lounsbury's work on an Oneida dictionary. There are an abundance of recordings in Series VII including "Dekanawidah" as told by Demus Elm; the "opening" of the Thanksgiving address; sixteen conversations in Oneida; music. The correspondence, in Series I, includes Clifford Abbott's work, Oscar Archiquette's letter in Oneida, Harry Basehart work on Oneida language, medicine-compounding, false faces, [Oneida] hymnbooks, Leonard Bloomfield's study of alternative forms for Oneida numerals, William Fenton's studies of Oneida linguistics, Bryan Gick's the Harvey / Demus Creation / Tekanawita story in Oneida with a complete English translation, Tayokawe (Curtis John) language materials and recordings, Robert Ritzenthaler's Oneida recordings and translation of Oscar Archiquette's Oneida diary, Morris Swadesh on the Wisconsin Oneida language project, Tony Wonderly's list of Oneida personal names
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Onondaga
Date: 1834-1888; 1938-1978
Description: The Onondaga materials in the Lounsbury collection include a French-Onondaga from 1860 in Series II. There are numerous audio recordings including that of a Condolence Ceremony and the Feast of the White Dog (Guy-wee-oo) in Series VII. (These recordings are restricted due to cultural sensitivity.) The correspondence, in Series I, includes a recording in Onondaga of Handsome Lake's code by Harold Blau, William Fenton's work with Howard Sky on the Goldenweiser version of the Great Law of Peace in Onondaga, Michael Foster's description of collecting versions of the Thanksgiving Address in Onondaga, Cara Richards Onondaga recordings.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Abenaki | Mi'kmaq | Penobscot
Language(s): English | Abenaki, Eastern
Date: 1669; 1678; 1725-1796; 1809-1884; 1900-1995
Extent: 12 linear feet; 3 hrs. (audio)
Description: The Penobscot materials in the Frank Siebert Papers are concentrated in Series III. Siebert collected census material, treaties and treaty minutes, placenames, with a strong representation of songs, stories, and linguistic materials. There are detailed notes about Indian claims in Maine and genealogical information. There are also educational materials for the teaching of the Penobscot language as well as a wealth of information on Penobscot linguistics. Series V, Siebert's notebooks, have extensive grammatical, phonetic, and vocabulary of the Penobscot language. Both Series III and V reflect Siebert's deep interest in the history of Maine and the Eastern Abenaki including archaeological, pre-history, and colonial era documents such as the Eliot Bible, which Siebert owned a rare copy in his library, which was sold at auction. Series VI and VII contain various drafts of essays on Penobscot culture, language, and history. Series XII contains approximately 3 hours of Penobscot language recordings, primarily from the 1930s and 1950s.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Seneca | Cayuga
Date: 1950-1995
Description: The Seneca materials in the Lounsbury Papers include his extensive work on kinship. Linguistic materials in Series II include work done by Karin Michelson, Morris Swadesh, and Wallace Chafe. Recordings in Series VII include songs from the Cold Spring Longhouse on the Allegany Indian reservation (NY). There are a large number of unidentified songs.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)