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Bororo
Language(s): English | Guarani | Bororo | Paresi | Portuguese
Date: 1950
Description: The Bororo materials in the Lounsbury Papers include linguistic materials in Series II. There are a significant number of audio recordings of narratives and chanting in Series VII. The correspondence, in Series I, includes Zarko Levak's work on the Bororo, Carl Schuster's photographs of Bororo jaguar skin robes. See also correspondence with the Eastman Kodak Company about photos of Bororo people that they refused to develop.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Ho-Chunk
Alternate forms: Winnebago
Language(s): English | Ho-Chunk
Date: 1908-1930 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 49 items
Description: Materials relating to Radin's study of Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) history, culture, and language. Some items are written in Ho-Chunk, with and without English translations. This large collection includes 34 original field notebooks; numerous short and long stories (Hare cycle, Aleck Linetree [probably Alec Lone Tree], the origin of the Buffalo clan, the story of the holy one, the boy who wished to be immortal, etc.); several longer pieces, such as a typed manuscript titled "The legend of Mother-of-all-the-Earth," speeches of Charlie Houghton, multiple versions of "How Blowsnake joined the medicine dance," "Origin myth of the medicine dance," etc.; several published secondary sources; over 3,000 slips for an English-Winnebago [i.e. Ho-Chunk] dictionary and other items relating to Ho-Chunk phonetics, lexicon, linguistics, etc.; several phonetic texts, some with English translation; and a variety of other items with ethnographic, historical, and linguistic data pertaining to ceremonies, tales, clans, medicine, origins, dance, burial, peyote, names, and sweat-baths. Individuals mentioned (some as ) include: Jacob Russell, Charlie Houghton, Oliver LaMere, Sam Blowsnake, John Rave, Thomas Clay, Robert Lincoln, James Smith, Tom Big Bear, and George Ricehill.
Collection: Paul Radin papers (Mss.497.3.R114)

Hopi
Language(s): English | Hopi
Date: 1960, 1963, 1965-1970, 1973, 1976-1978, 1988-1989, 1994, 2006
Extent: 1286 pages, 11 photographs
Description: The Hopi materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 18 items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Black, Cameron, Hodge, Jeanne, Kealiinohomoku, Masayesva, McChesney, Schepers, Seaman, Swanson, and Voegelin. Some of these materials may be restricted due to cultural sensitvity or privacy considerations.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Colville | Ktunaxa
Alternate forms: Kootenai, Kootenay, Kutenai
Date: 1891, 1894, 1913-1927, 1947
Type:Text
Extent: 19 notebooks, 66 bluebooks, 1052 loose pages, approx. 5600 word slips
Description: The Ktunaxa materials in the ACLS collection are concentrated primarily in the "Kutenai" section of the finding aid, which contains a full listing of all contents. The earliest materials in this section linguistic manuscripts by Jesuit missionaries such as Phillippo Canestrelli and John Post, as well as extensive linguistic and anthropological field notes by Alexander Chamberlain, all from the 1890s. Subsequently, James Teit's "Traditions and information regarding the Tonaxa" from 1913 includes ethnographic and historical information, recorded in part at Tobacco Plains. The most voluminous amount of material overall is that of Franz Boas, recorded in the 1910s, which includes numerous field notebooks, lexical files, and related notes. Finally, see also Paul Garvin's field notes from 1947, recorded at Phrases taken from Lower Kutenai at Bonner's Ferry, Idaho; Cranbrook, B.C.; Creston, B.C.; and Elmo, Montana.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Hidatsa | Mandan
Language(s): English | Hidatsa | Mandan
Date: 1967-1972
Extent: 11 sound tape reels (87 hr., 26 min.) : DIGITIZED
Description: This program consists of primarily of recordings converting Robert C. Hollow's Mandan dictionary into Hidatsa with the assistance of speaker James Driver. Most of the recordings consist of a Hidatsa word list elicited by the reading of English terms and phrases from the Mandan-English section of Robert C. Hollow's Mandan dictionary. The Mandan equivalents from the dictionary are infrequently given. Includes occasional discussion of context and usage of given words, as well as occasional comments on Hidatsa social life and customs. Also includes recordings analyzing the "Sacred Arrow Myth" that Bowers recorded with Sam Newman in Hidatsa in July 1932. James Driver also gives several narratives in Hidatsa on "Trip with Paul Ewald to family graves," "Data on tribal lands," "History of the Catholic Mission," and "Traveling to Minot," which in part concerns the Influenza Epidemic of 1918-1919. (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: Mandan-Hidatsa cultural change and language studies, Fort Berthold Reservation (Mss.Rec.84)

Mohawk | Shawnee | Tuscarora
Language(s): English | Mohawk
Date: 1863; 1903; 1949-1972
Description: The Mohawk materials in the Lounsbury Papers include a good deal of linguistic materials collected by Gordon Day, Marius Barbeau, Edward Sapir, J.N.B. Hewitt, and Lounsbury in Series II. There are also notes for a Mohawk dictionary collected by Gunther Michelson between 1961-1994. The recordings in Series VII include a series entitled "The Mohawks Learn Mohawk," of Lounsbury talking with students in a classroom setting. There are also recordings of Lounsbury teaching at Yale with the Mohawk speaker Minnie Diabo
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Nahua
Date: ca.1940s-2003
Type:Text
Extent: 2 linear feet
Description: William Bright's Nahuatl materials are sizeable and cover his entire research life, mostly consisting of his own work from the 1960s and 1990s (Series 4), and many copies of small publications throughout his life (Series 2). Of note in the small publications is almost every issue of “Nahua Newsletter” (Indiana University) between 1986 and 2004, issues 1-18 of “Mexihkatl Itonalama”, and several 1940s-1960s SIL-archived publications. From his own work (Series 4) are interlinear glosses of Nahuatl texts, materials in preparation for taught courses at UCLA, products of brief fieldwork in Ixmiquilpan, Mexico, 1966, working versions of two of his own publications, and further linguistic analysis. He also corresponded with several linguists on Nahuatl varieties (Series 1), including Una Canger, who gave him a copy of the Copenhagen Nahuatl Dictionary Project.
Collection: William O. Bright Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.142)

Natchez | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Creek | Seminole | Apalachee | Alabama | Koasati | Tunica | Atakapa | Chitimacha
Alternate forms: Coushatta
Date: ca.1934-1960s
Type:Text
Extent: 5 linear feet
Description: Mary Haas' Natchez file is one of her largest, and relatively little was published from it during her lifetime. She conducted fieldwork with Watt Sam, Nancy Raven and Peggy Leaf, captured in twelve field notebooks in Series 2. A large volume of texts were elicited here and later typeset, with different versions also present in Series 2. Particularly extensive is Haas' set of Natchez lexical slips, amounting to 7 boxes (likely over 10,000 slips), including (in addition to full alphabetizations) grammatical analyses and comparisons with other languages. Haas' fieldwork on Natchez and other neighboring languages was used as partial evidence for the Gulf hypothesis, for which comparisons are abundant also in Series 9. Additionally, Haas corresponded with a large number of linguists (Series 1).
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Onondaga
Date: 1834-1888; 1938-1978
Description: The Onondaga materials in the Lounsbury collection include a French-Onondaga from 1860 in Series II. There are numerous audio recordings including that of a Condolence Ceremony and the Feast of the White Dog (Guy-wee-oo) in Series VII. (These recordings are restricted due to cultural sensitivity.) The correspondence, in Series I, includes a recording in Onondaga of Handsome Lake's code by Harold Blau, William Fenton's work with Howard Sky on the Goldenweiser version of the Great Law of Peace in Onondaga, Michael Foster's description of collecting versions of the Thanksgiving Address in Onondaga, Cara Richards Onondaga recordings.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Abenaki | Mi'kmaq | Penobscot
Language(s): English | Abenaki, Eastern
Date: 1669; 1678; 1725-1796; 1809-1884; 1900-1995
Extent: 12 linear feet; 3 hrs. (audio)
Description: The Penobscot materials in the Frank Siebert Papers are concentrated in Series III. Siebert collected census material, treaties and treaty minutes, placenames, with a strong representation of songs, stories, and linguistic materials. There are detailed notes about Indian claims in Maine and genealogical information. There are also educational materials for the teaching of the Penobscot language as well as a wealth of information on Penobscot linguistics. Series V, Siebert's notebooks, have extensive grammatical, phonetic, and vocabulary of the Penobscot language. Both Series III and V reflect Siebert's deep interest in the history of Maine and the Eastern Abenaki including archaeological, pre-history, and colonial era documents such as the Eliot Bible, which Siebert owned a rare copy in his library, which was sold at auction. Series VI and VII contain various drafts of essays on Penobscot culture, language, and history. Series XII contains approximately 3 hours of Penobscot language recordings, primarily from the 1930s and 1950s.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)