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Alabama | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Creek | Seminole | Apalachee | Koasati
Alternate forms: Alibamu, Coushatta
Date: 1934-1982
Type:Text
Extent: 0.5 linear feet
Description: Mary Haas worked for a short period to document Alabama with several speakers on in the 1930s. The field notebook is in Series 2 Subseries ‘Multiple Languages' and includes comparisons with Koasati and Choctaw. Around 585 lexical items were obtained from this fieldwork, from which lexical slip files (Series 9) are derived. Haas also utilized John R. Swanton's dictionary of Alabama, and Alabama forms part of extensive Muskogean language comparisons, mostly in Series 2. There is also brief correspondence.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Apalachee
Language(s): Apalachee | English
Date: undated
Type:Text
Extent: 0.1 linear feet
Description: The Apalachee language is only attested in a letter in Spanish to King Charles II of Spain in 1688. Haas translated the document and added comparisons to other Muskogean languages, the results of which are in Series 2 (some unfortunately heavily damaged by mold) alongside ethnographic notes copied from other sources and comparisons to prove Apalachee's place within the Muskogean language family. In addition to the dedicated subseries in Series 2, see Subseries ‘Multiple Languages', Series 9, and correspondence.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Catawba | Houma | Pamunkey | Cheraw | Yuchi | Cherokee | Innu | Naskapi | Dakota | Wateree | Creek | Shawnee | Haudenosaunee | Tutelo | Powhatan
Alternate forms: Montagnais-Naskapi, Sioux, Iroquois
Language(s): English | Catawba
Date: 1914-1947
Type:Text
Extent: 21 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Catawba history, language, and culture. This includes Speck's correspondence with indigenous consultants such as Red Thunder Cloud, Chief Sam Blue, and Leola Blue (Catawba) and Will West Long and Climbing Bear (Cherokee); correspondence with other anthropologists and linguists, such as John Reed Swanton, William N. Fenton, Erminie Wheeler-Voegelin, C.F. Voegelin, Morris Swadesh, A. I. Hallowell, Mary Haas, and others; genealogies of twentieth-century Catawba consultants; a Catawba bibliography; notes on topics including Catawba division of time, travel and expedition, food resources, racial status in the South, and notes, possibly for a lecture, titled "The Catawba-A Small Nation Deflated"; a University of Pennsylvania student's essay on Catawba tribal correspondence with J. Walter Fewkes about Speck's Catawba field trips; field notebooks devoted to ethnologic notes, vocabulary, texts, songs, and other linguistic and cultural data; and collections of notes devoted to Catawba language and texts, general ethnological notes, and miscellaneous notes. Some of the notes and notebooks and much of the correspondence mentions other indigenous groups as well.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Catawba
Language(s): Catawba | English
Date: 1930s-1960s (bulk: 1940-1941)
Type:Text
Extent: 1.0 linear feet
Description: Haas' Catawba file was sent to her by Raven I. McDavid from fieldwork in 1940-1941. Haas subsequently made copies and sent the originals to James M. Crawford, in whose collection at the APS they now reside. These are found in Series 2 Subseries ‘Catawba', and are varied and comprehensive in content, along with an animal lexicon and a series of reprints from Andrew Pickens. McDavid also sent two boxes of handwritten Catawba slips, “culled from Speck, from Morris's notes, from mine - and possibly from Gatschet”, some of which were heavily damaged by mold and can be found in Series 9. There is also a glossary and lexicon in correspondence from McDavid, Series 1.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Cherokee
Language(s): English | Cherokee
Date: 1828-1905; 1939-1975
Description: The Cherokee materials in the Lounsbury Papers is found primarily in several sections of the collection. Series I contains correspondence with a number of people on Cherokee language and culture. These correspondents include Harry Basehart, William Cook, William Fenton, John D. Gillespie, Mary Haas, Jack Kilpatrick, John Witthoft. In Series II, see the "Cherokee" section, which contains 3 boxes of research materials, including Lounsbury's field notes with numerous Cherokee speakers in Oklahoma, copies of original notes by other linguists, language instruction materials, and other related documents. The "General Iroquois" section contains some comparative materials as well, as may other sections to smaller degrees. Series VI contains multiple boxes of card files with Cherokee language data in the form of lexicons and texts in translation. In Series VII, there are several audio recordings, including a reading of Private John G. Burnett's eyewitness account of Cherokee removal, 1838-1839, and a significant number of recordings of songs and dances made by Will West Long and Della Owl, and Cherokee lessons by Robert Bushyhead and William Cook.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Cherokee
Language(s): Cherokee | Natchez | English
Date: 1940s, undated
Type:Text
Extent: 0.25 linear feet
Description: Haas' Cherokee file is centered on her fieldwork in Oklahoma with Watt Sam and Nancy Raven, both Natchez speakers who also spoke Cherokee and Creek. Although Creek was the dominant intermediary language between Natchez and English for both of Haas' Natchez consultants, some Cherokee lexica and verb paradigms were recorded in the Natchez notebooks of Series 2. There is also a small amount of Cherokee material in Victor Riste's notebooks in the same Natchez subseries. Series 9 contains lexica, paradigms, phonotactics, and dialectal variation, likely mostly derived from these sources. Besides these, there are some discussions of Cherokee town names and consultants in Series 1, and a few comparisons to Iroquoian and Muskogean languages.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Ditidaht | Nuu-chah-nulth
Alternate forms: Nitinat
Language(s): Ditidaht | English
Date: 1931-1932, 1935
Type:Text
Extent: 14 notebooks and approximately 6700 slips
Description: The Ditidaht materials in the ACLS collection are found in the "Nitinat" section of the finding aid. The bulk of the material consists of field notebooks recorded by Mary Haas and Morris Swadesh primarily from Chief Peter (Batlisqawa) and his son Jasper of Port Renfrew in 1931. The notebooks include numerous texts of traditional stories, histories, autobiographical stories, and other content including place names, Vocabularies, and grammatical notes. A full table of contents of these notebooks is available. An extensive lexical file of over 6700 terms, derived from these field notebooks, is also found in this collection. See the Ditidaht materials in the Mary Haas papers for addtional notebooks and photographs recorded during this fieldwork.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Atakapa | Biloxi | Catawba | Cherokee | Chitimacha | Choctaw | Chickasaw | Cocopah | Creek | Houma | Koasati | Lumbee | Natchez | Quapaw | Seminole | Shawnee | Timucua | Tunica | Tuscarora | Yuchi
Alternate forms: Cocopa, Coushatta
Language(s): English | Mobilian | Yuchi
Date: circa 1962-1983
Extent: 29 folders
Description: This entry is intended to encompass materials relating to James M. Crawford's interest in and study of Native North American languages. These items tend to be too general, too diffuse, or too vague in nature to easily fit under clear cultural or linguistic umbrellas. In Series III-D. Works by Crawford--Other, these items include "A Brief Account of the Indian Tribes of Northeast Georgia" (1962), a paper Crawford submitted in his Linguistics 170 class at Berkeley; Crawford's largely negative review of "Native Americans and Their Languages" by Roger Owen (1978); a typed copy of Crawford's "A Phonological Comparison of the Speech of Two Communities in California: East Bay and El Centro" (1964); typed drafts (with handwritten sections and penciled edits) of Crawford's "The Phonological Sequence ya in Words Pertaining to the Mouth in Southeastern and Other Indian Languages," which appeared in the volume “Studies in Southeastern Indian Languages,” which he edited (1975); and three folders pertaining to Crawford's other work on the edited volume “Studies in Southeastern Indian Languages,” including drafts, edits, notes, etc., of the preface and introduction Crawford wrote for the volume as well as exhaustive notes on bibliographic sources for several indigenous languages, including Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Natchez, Apalachee, Houma, Creek (Mukogean), Hitchiti, Seminole, Mobilian Jargon, Mikasuki, Alabama, Quapaw, Atakapa, Chitimacha, Timucua, Yuchi, Tuscarora, etc. (1970s). In Series IV-D. Research Notes & Notebooks—Other, items include a folder titled “Columbus Museum,” dated to July 1969, with research notes pertaining to Yuchi, Choctaw, Alabama-Koasati, Cherokee, etc., including the names and addresses of many potential language consultants for Yuchi, Shawnee, Catawba, Cherokee, etc., including some of the same people he visits in 1976 as described in “Mobilian Search—Notebook”; a folder labeled “Dialect Study (El Centro, East Bay),” with mostly handwritten notes and drafts pertaining to his "A Phonological Comparison of the Speech of Two Communities in California: East Bay and El Centro" (1964); “Haas Miscellany,” containing an Algonquian language chart attributed to Haas and two scraps of paper pertaining to her; “Miscellany,” containing notes on Maricopa, Digueno, Cocopa, Koasati, etc., as well as a plant specimen identified as Euphorbia chamaesyce; “Numerals from Indian Languages,” containing undated notes on numerals in Natchez, Muskogean, Hokan, Pomoan, Yukian, Wintun, Salinan, Esselen, Chumash, etc.; “Reconnaissance of Southeastern Indian Languages—Notebook,” a 1969 field notebook of a research trip mentioning numerous language consultants (Mrs. Rufus George, Yuchi and Cherokee, and Claude Medford, Creek?, prominent among them) and possible consultants, Choctaw, Seminole, Mikasuki, Cherokee, Lumbee, Creek, Chitimacha, Chickasaw, Shawnee, Yuchi, Tunica, Biloxi, Natchez, etc. people and languages, and commentary about relations between various groups, especially with Oklahoma groups [This item appears to be related to Crawford's research into the see also Mobilian materials]; “Mrs. Terrell—Notebook,” which contains a notebook of unidentified indigenous words elicited from consultants Mrs. Terrell and Mrs. Fletcher in April-May 1969; and “Unidentified,” containing sheets with a text in an unidentified indigenous language and its English translation. In Series VI. Course Material, there is a folder of materials relating to Crawford's coursework at Berkley, including “American Indian Languages--Linguistics 170 [1962]” as well as some Native North American material in an undated folder labeled “Seminars: 290a Theory; 290g American Indian Languages; Dialectology 216; 225; 130 Phonology—Notebook.” In Series II. Subject Files, there are materials relating to Crawford's research into to Mobilian, Cocopah, and Yuchi in “American Council of Learned Societies”; materials relating to his work in bilingual education under Title VII, particularly with the Yuchi in Oklahoma, in “Bilingual Education”; news clippings related to the work of Crawford and others in “Clippings”; records of payments to indigenous language consultants in “Informants' Receipts”; materials relating to Crawford's work with the Southeastern Indian Language Project via application materials in “National Science Foundation #1” and “National Science Foundation #2”; one folder of readers' reviews (pre-publication) and another folder of post-publication reviews of “Studies in Southeastern Indian Languages”; and a grant proposal to do field work to study Yuchi in Sapulpa, Oklahoma in “University of Georgia—Grant Proposal,” in which Crawford outlines not only his proposed study but some historical information about Yuchi people and language. Finally, Series I. Correspondence contains many exchanges about Crawford's work on Native North American languages. Most of this correspondence revolves around Crawford's submission of papers and articles to academic conferences and publishers. The most interesting items include a letter from Ilona May (Thomas) Keyaite, the daughter of a Cocopah consultant; letters and notes about 1735 drawings of Yuchi and Creek Indians in Georgia in a folder labelled “Sturtevant, William C.” [1977-1978]. This series also includes various letters and notes from the University of Georgia recognizing Crawford's professional accomplishments and awards, and a few letters documenting the difficult publication history of the volume on Southeastern Indian Languages.
Collection: James M. Crawford Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.66)

Kiowa | Ponca | Shawnee | Cheyenne | Menominee | Ho-Chunk
Language(s): English
Date: 1885; 1936-1981
Description: The General Linguistics material in the Lounsbury collection can be found in Series II. It includes a broad array works ranging from archeoastronomy to maps to lectures presented by Lounsbury on the history of linguistics. Many of the items are secondary sources.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Haudenosaunee | Catawba | Bororo | Hopi | Mohawk | Shawnee | Cayuga | Cherokee
Date: 1862; 1913-1996
Description: The Haudenosaunee materials in the Lounsbury Papers are vast in scope ranging from ceremonial recordings in Series VII to secondary sources in Series II to Lounsbury's own linguistic work among the Six Nations (see notes on Mohawk, Cayuga, Seneca, Oneida, and Onondaga materials.). The correspondence, in Series I, includes notes by Marius Barbeau on six Iroquoian dialects, a recording of the Condolence Ceremony recited by George Thomas, Gordon Day's work on Iroquois place names in Vermont, William Fenton's work on Iroquois-Cherokee linguistic relations, a manuscript of Mary Haas' comments on FGL's "Iroquois-Cherokee Linguistic Relations," George Harnell's work on Iroquois culture, Gunther Michelson's work on Iroquois place names, James Pendergast's study of longhouse construction and LaSalle's 1669-1670, Morris Swadesh's notes on the Caughnawaga Iroquois in Brooklyn, NY, Elisabeth Tooker on Iroquois cosmology, a manuscript of Iroquois grammar by Carl Voeglin, William Wykoff's study of Iroquois prehistory.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)