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Abenaki | Innu | Penobscot | Maliseet | Haudenosaunee | Wabanaki | Atikamekw
Alternate forms: Abnaki, Tete de Boule
Date: 1914-1930
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: The Abenaki materials in the Hallowell Papers are mostly located in Series V, Research Files, in folders labled "Abenaki" and Series VI, Photographs, Subseries E "St. Francis Abenaki Album." These include linguistic, ethnographic, ethnobotanical, ceremonial knowledge, information on political organization, and historical materials. Of particular interest are a sketch of Abenaki history from 1600-1930 accompanied by detailed notes from secondary sources on 17th century Abenaki history. The linguistic materials include an analysis of how the language changed after contact with Catholic missionaries, Abenaki vocabulary related to body parts, Abenaki phonetics, and religious, medical, and kinship terminology. The ethnobotanical materials include a manuscript labled "Identity of animals and plants," and information concerning herbal medicine and its practitioners. There is a wealth of ethnographic materials that include drawings of pipes, descriptions of games, baketry and birch bark maks. There is descriptions of Abenaki music and diagrams of dances, as well as detailed descriptions of hunting techniques. Some of the genealogical materials contains lists of community members names and descriptions of marriage. Interspered throughout the folders labled "Abenaki" in the Research Files are interlinear translations of stories such as "Man who could Find Lost Objects," "Woman and Bear Lover" and numerous other stories. The materials on hunting include topics such as the use of snow shoes, preparation of moose hide,and techniques and drawings of trapping. The collections contain important information designation hunting territories and family names. Four folders contain detailed informaiton on kinship terms. Two folders on Measurements and Genealogical data contain lists of names. The folders labled "Linguistics" in Series V contain scattered information about Abenaki grammar. In Series VI, of 160 photographs taken at St. Francis, Odanak in the Centre-du-Québec region. The Abenaki people in the photographs are identified, in most cases, and also include depictions of traditional dress, buildings, clothing, baskets, and a wide variety of material culture. The correspondence, in Series I, includes letters from Theophile Panadis; Gordon Day describing his collection of stories, recordings, vocabularies, and hunting territories. Henry Lorne Masta, one of Hallowell's Abenaki consultants, writes about culture and language. Additional correspondents may contain other Abenaki-related information.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Innu | Naskapi | Atikamekw | Wabanaki | Lenape | Algonquin | Mashpee | Passamaquoddy | Wampanoag | Mi'kmaq | Penobscot | Maliseet | Muscogee | Menominee
Alternate forms: Menomini, Têtes-de-Boules, Têtes de Boules, Tete de Boule
Language(s): English | Abenaki, Eastern
Date: 1920-1940
Description: The materials from Algonquian speaking cultures is quite extensive, though scattered, in the A. Irving Hallowell Papers. One of the strengths is Hallowell's very fine black and white portraits of indigenous peoples located in Series VI, Subseries F, which includes images of Mashpee, Mohegan, Montagnais, Naskapi, Womponowag, Nipissing, Atikamekw, Series V contains some generalized materials such "Algoquian Cross Cousin Marriage," Speck's studies of northern Algoquian hunting territories, and Algonquin mythology and history. The folders entitled "Eastern Woodlands" in box 26 contain more culturally specific materials such as a Penobscot vocabulary list, Innu and Naswkapi material culture, and Delaware religions and ceremonies, although many of these are quite brief. The correspondence, in Series I, includes a letter from John Swanton discussing bear ceremonialism in Muscogee culture. George Herzog's correspondence includes Penobscot and Maliseet scores of war dance songs. There is also a letter from Jeffrey Zelitch, dated 1969, describing traditional ceremonies on the Lakota Rosebud reservation just before the American Indian Movement begins. George Spindler's lettter to describes a Medicine Lodge ceremony among the Menomini.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Naskapi | Yurok
Language(s): English
Date: 1918-1945 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 10 items
Description: A variety of materials relating to Speck's study of diverse Algonquian peoples, cultures, and languages. Includes his "Remnants of the Eastern Indian Tribes," a brief discussion of location of New England Algonquians; his favorable review of John M. Cooper, "Snares, Deadfalls, and other Traps of Northern Algonquians and Northern Athapascans" [Printed, Speck (1939).]; a "Table of Double Curve Motif," charting techniques and variations of motifs of various Northwestern, Iroquoian, and central Algonquian peoples; a manuscript draft and additions of "Terms of relationship and the family territorial band among the Northeastern Algonquins," [Printed, Speck (1918).]; letters from Alanson Skinner challenging Speck's ethnic position of the Southeastern Algonquian on meaning of Eskimo-type artifacts found in Algonquian site in New York (State); materials from Eva L. Butler, including two pamphlets containing transcriptions of historical letters, principally from the Connecticut State Library--"Colonial Letters of our Ancestors" and "Letters of the Indians"--and "Botany and ethnozoology of the New England Indians," a bibliography of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century sources for ethnobotantical and ethnozoological references; letters from Edward Sapir concerning Speck (1918a), particularly Yurok comparisons, his excitement about reduction of language stocks, and possible typographical errors; and letters from Carl F. Voegelen concerning the usefulness of Speck's Naskapi material for comparative study of Algonquian languages and seeking an article on process by which Algonquian languages become extinct.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Catawba | Houma | Pamunkey | Cheraw | Yuchi | Cherokee | Innu | Naskapi | Dakota | Wateree | Creek | Shawnee | Haudenosaunee | Tutelo | Powhatan
Alternate forms: Montagnais-Naskapi, Sioux, Iroquois
Language(s): English | Catawba
Date: 1914-1947
Type:Text
Extent: 21 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Catawba history, language, and culture. This includes Speck's correspondence with indigenous consultants such as Red Thunder Cloud, Chief Sam Blue, and Leola Blue (Catawba) and Will West Long and Climbing Bear (Cherokee); correspondence with other anthropologists and linguists, such as John Reed Swanton, William N. Fenton, Erminie Wheeler-Voegelin, C.F. Voegelin, Morris Swadesh, A. I. Hallowell, Mary Haas, and others; genealogies of twentieth-century Catawba consultants; a Catawba bibliography; notes on topics including Catawba division of time, travel and expedition, food resources, racial status in the South, and notes, possibly for a lecture, titled "The Catawba-A Small Nation Deflated"; a University of Pennsylvania student's essay on Catawba tribal correspondence with J. Walter Fewkes about Speck's Catawba field trips; field notebooks devoted to ethnologic notes, vocabulary, texts, songs, and other linguistic and cultural data; and collections of notes devoted to Catawba language and texts, general ethnological notes, and miscellaneous notes. Some of the notes and notebooks and much of the correspondence mentions other indigenous groups as well.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Catawba | Cherokee | Tutelo
Language(s): English | Catawba | Tutelo
Date: 1716; 1803; 1951-1997
Extent: 7 boxes
Description: The Catawba materials in the Frank Siebert Papers are primarily concentrated in Series II. These consist of copies of secondary sources such as an "Indian Vocabulary from Fort Christanna, 1716, Catawba census notes, 1830-1929, land claim agreements, and a dictionary of Place names in South Carolina. Original materials include hundreds of pages of Siebert's FIeld notes and a Catawba vocabulary / dictionary done with Wes Taukchiray.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Maya
Language(s): English | Spanish
Date: 1926-1959
Extent: Circa 455 leaves; circa 635 pages; photographs
Description: The Central America materials, John Alden Mason Papers include correspondence regarding linguistic, archaeological, and ethnological work in Mexico and Guatemala; meetings; etc. Regarding archaeological work in Guatemala, Mexico, and Panama. Regarding Piedras Negras, Guatemala; Chichen Itza; archaeological work in Guatemala and Mexico. Regarding archaeological work in Guatemala, Mexico, and Texas. Regarding Pima; Yaqui; Piedras Negras, Guatemala; Maya glyphs and architecture; archaeological work in Guatemala, Mexico, and British Honduras. The bulk of the material is from 1933-1939 and concerns archaeological work at Piedras Negras, Guatemala. Some discussion of the Mayan calendar, the ruins at Yaxchilan, Mexico, and a 1953 expedition to the Caracol Ruins, Honduras. Scholarly materials: Article for [Lilly de Jongh] Osborne's handbook of Guatemala regarding the ruins of Piedras Negras, Guatemala. A paper entitled, "Los cuatro grandes filones linguisticos de Mexico y Centroamerica" for the International Congress of Americanists, Mexico, August 1939. A paper read at meeting of the American Anthropological Association, December 1938, on the genetic classification of Middle American languages. Bibliographies of books and a few manuscripts on Indians of Central America, Mexico, and South America; letter from Zelig Harris to Mason; Mason's reply. Paper sent to Mason to be read at the meeting of the American Anthropological Association. Discusses Hokan-Siouan Phylum, Tarascan, Macro-Otomanguean Phylum, Macro-Penutian Phylum, and Macro-Chibchan Phylum. Notes on genetic relationships and geographic distribution. Mostly from published sources. A compilation and juxtaposition of various opinions. A talk given before Sociedad de geografia e historia de Guatemala regarding the architecture of Piedras Negras. English original which was translated into Spanish for publication in Anales 15 (December 1938): pages 202-216. A paper "Middle American Linguistics, 1955" by Norman A. McQuown; draft of a paper by Mason discussing that of McQuown; a copy of Mason's paper as delivered at the meeting of the American Anthropological Association, November 17, 1955, Boston; a copy of Mason's paper as corrected for correspondence with Robert J. Weitlaner and Gordon R. Willey.
Collection: John Alden Mason Papers (Mss.B.M384)

Choctaw
Language(s): English
Date: 1904 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 14 pages
Description: Item titled "Miscellaneous notes (Choctaw)." Includes one-page note with embossed Great Seal of the Choctaw Nation; 9 pages of bibliographical notes; 2 pages on Choctaw burial-1904; and 2 pages on Choctaw medicines. Some of these items are restricted due to cultural sensitivity.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Haudenosaunee | Oneida | Seneca
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1920-1939
Extent: 1 folder
Description: The Haudenosaunee materials in the Hallowell papers are located in Series V. There are postcards of museum exhibits featuring Iroquois culture in the "American Indian" series of folders. The rest of the materials are concentrated in the folder labled "Eastern Woodlands." These items include information on material culture, the social organization of the confederacy, a chart of relational systems of clans, kinship, and genealogy. Specific topics includ Huron Mythology, Oneida magic, Seneca secret societies and genealogy. Some of this material is culturally sensitive and may be restricted.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Inuit
Alternate forms: Eskimo
Language(s): English
Date: c. 1930-1937
Extent: 3 folders
Description: The Inuit materials in the Hallowell Papers include notes on ethnographic materials, analyses of myths, shamanism, property, racial identification, anthropometry, and somaltology. There are newspaper clippings, one entitled "Artic Adventure" by Peter Freuchen and reading notes from secondary sources.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Meskwaki
Alternate forms: Fox
Language(s): English
Date: Undated
Type:Text
Extent: 1 folder
Description: Items titled "Fox ceremonies." Includes a two-page questionnaire (not filled out) and a one-page bibliographical note to Jones (1907--most likely Fox Texts, Volume I).
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)